Mijn hersenspinsels en gedachtekronkels

Exhibition I.M. Ziad Haider- زياد حيدر

Ziad met laatste werk

IM Ziad Haider

Gallery Out in the Field

Warmondstraat 197, Amsterdam

27/5- 27/6/2018
http://www.art-gallery-outinthefied.com

زياد حيدر

Here the Original Dutch version

The abstract works of Ziad Haider (1954, Al-Amara, Iraq-2006 Amsterdam, the Netherlands) can be interpreted as deep reflections on his own turbulent biography, but always indirect, on a highly sublimized level. Born in Iraq and lived through a period of war and imprisonment, and after he found his destiny in the Netherlands, he left an impressive oeuvre.

Ziad Haider studied in the first half of the seventies at the Baghdad Institute of Fine Arts. In the two decades before a flourishing local and original Iraqi art scene was created. From the fifties till the seventies Iraq was one of the leading countries in the Arab world in the field of modern art and culture. Artists like Jewad Selim, Shakir Hassan al-Said and Mahmud Sabri shaped their own version of international modernism. Although these artists were educated abroad (mainly in Europe), after returned to Iraq they founded an art movement which was both rooted in the local traditions of Iraq as fully connected with the international developments in modernist art. They created a strong and steady basis for an Iraqi modern art, unless how much the Iraqi modern art movement would suffer from during the following decades of oppression, war and occupation, so much that it mainly would find its destiny in exile.

The turning-point came during the time Ziad Haider was studying at the academy. Artists who were a member of the ruling Ba’th party- or willing to become one- were promised an even international career with many possibilities to exhibit, as long as they were willing to express their loyalty to the regime, or even sometimes participate in propaganda-projects, like monuments, or portraits and statues of Saddam Husayn. Ziad Haider, who never joined the Ba’th party, was sent into the army.

In 1980 the Iraqi regime launched the long and destructive war with Iran. Many young Iraqis were sent into the army to fight at the frontline. This also happened to Ziad Haider. The Iraq/Iran war was a destructive trench war in which finally one million Iraqis (and also one million Iranians) died. The years of war meant a long interruption in Ziad Haider’s career and live as an artist. It turned out much more dramatic for him, when he was back in Baghdad for a short period at home. He was arrested after he peed on a portrait of Saddam Husayn. Ziad Haider was sent to Abu Ghraib Prison, where he stayed for five years (1986-1990) probably the darkest period of his life. After his time in prison he was sent away to the front again, this time in a new war: the occupation of Kuwait and the following American attack on Iraq.

Ziad 2018 2.jpg

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

After the Intifada of 1991, the massive uprising against the Iraqi regime in the aftermath of the Gulf War, which was violently supressed, Ziad Haider fled Iraq, like many others. After a period of five years in Syria and Jordan he was recognized by the UN as a refugee and was invited to live in the Netherlands, which became his new homeland. With a few paintings and drawings, he arrived 1997 in Amersfoort. After Amersfoort he lived for short a while in Almere and finally in Amsterdam. In first instance it was not simple to start all over again as an artist in his new country. Beside he worked further in his personal style he started to draw portraits in the streets of Amsterdam (the Leidse Plein and the Rembrandtplein). Later he organised, together with the Dutch artist Paula Vermeulen he met during this time and became his partner, several courses in drawing and painting in their common studio. Ziad Haider was very productive in this period and created many different works in different styles. Giving courses in figurative drawing and painting and drawing portraits was for him very important. As he told in a Dutch television documentary on five Iraqi artists in the Netherlands (2004, see here) these activities and the positive interaction with people were for him the best tools to “drive away his nightmares”.

Ziad 2018 1.jpg

In his abstract works, always the main part of his artistic production, he sought the confrontation with the demons from the past. Although abstract there are often some recognisable elements, which are returning in several works during the years. A returning motive is the representation of his feet. This refers to several events from his own life. As a soldier Ziad had to march for days. When he was released from prison, together with some other prisoners, he was the only one who, although heavily tortured on his feet, who was able to stand up and walk. And his feet brought him further, on his long journey into exile, till he finally found a safe place to live and work.

Ziad 2018 3.jpg

The motive of his bare feet is not the only figurative element in his work. In many of his paintings and drawings there are some more or less anthropomorphic elements, often molten together with structures with the appearance of liquid metal. The theme of man and machine plays an important role in the expressive works of Ziad. Of course this is close connected to his own biography and history of war and imprisonment.

In some of his works one can vividly experience a sense of a claustrophobic space, referring to his time spending in the trenches during the war, the interior of the tank and- later- the prison-cell. But all these experiences went through a process of transformation, of abstraction and translated in the language of art. And this art is, unless the underlying struggle, very lyrical in its expression.

Ziad 2018 4.jpg

The also in the Netherlands living Iraqi journalist, poet and critic Karim al-Najar wrote about Ziad Haider: “For a very long time the artist, Ziad Haider, has been living in solitude, prison and rebellion. On this basis, the foregoing works constitute his open protest against the decline, triviality and prominence of half-witted personalities as well as their accession of the authority of art and culture in Iraq for more than two decades. Here we could touch the fruits of the artist’s liberty and its reflection on his works. For Ziad Haider has been able to achieve works showing his artistic talent and high professionalism within a relatively short time. We see him at the present time liberated from his dark, heavy nightmares rapidly into their embodiment through colour and musical symmetry with the different situations. It indeed counts as a visual and aesthetic view of the drama of life as well as man’s permanent question, away from directness, conventionality and false slogans”.

Although he opposed another American war against Iraq, with an uncertain outcome for its people, the end of the Ba’athist regime made it possible to visit his home country after many years of exile. In the autumn of 2003 he visited Iraq for the first time since his long absence in exile. His visit to iraq made a great impression and also influenced his work after. In the last series of paintings he made his use of colours changed dramatically. The explosive use of intense shades of red were replaced for a use of sober browns and greys. The dynamic compositions were changed in regular constructed forms. Also these works, from his last series, are represented on this exhibition.

Ziad meant a lot for many, as an artist, but also as a human being and a friend. Within the community of exiled Iraqi artists in the Netherlands he played a very important role. In 2004 he initiated the Iraqi cultural manifestation in Amsterdam, with the title “I cross the Arch of Darkness”, a quote from a poem by his friend, the also in the Netherlands living Iraqi poet Salah Hassan ( ﺃﻋﺒﺭﻗﻮﺲ ﻟﻟﻆﻻﻢ  ﺃﻮﻤﻰﻋ ﻟﻟﻧﻬﺎﺭ ﺑﻌﻛﺎﺰﻱ  ,  from his collected poems, published under the title “A rebel with a broken compass”, 1997). In this festival visual artists, poets, musicians and actors came together to show the variety and richness of the Iraqi cultual life in exile to a Dutch audience.

During the years Ziad and Paula lived at the Rozengracht in the old centre of Amsterdam, there home was a regular meetingpoint of many exiled Iraqi artists, poets, writers, musicians, actors, journalists and intellectuals. Many will cherish their sweet memories of the sometimes notorious gatherings till deep in the night. His sudden death in 2006 was a great loss for many of us.

The works of Ziad are still here and they deserve to be exhibited (now his second exhibition after he passed away). With this exhibition we celebrate Ziad Haider what he meant as an artist and as a human being.

Floris Schreve

Amsterdam, 2018

Gallery Out in the Field

On this blog (mainly in Dutch):

Tentoonstelling Ziad Haider (Diversity and Art)

Iraakse kunstenaars in ballingschap

Modern and contemporary art of the Middle East and North Africa (English)

See also this In Memoriam of Ziad’s friend, the artcritic  Amer Fatuhi

The opening:

 34645923_1129592660516418_9220194087473250304_n

Tentoonstelling IM Ziad Haider- زياد حيدر

Ziad met laatste werk

IM Ziad Haider

Gallery Out in the Field

Warmondstraat 197, Amsterdam

27/5- 27/6/2018

http://www.art-gallery-outinthefied.com

 

زياد حيدر

Here the English version

Het abstracte werk van Ziad Haider (al-Amara, Irak, 1954-Amsterdam 2006) kan worden gezien als een diep doorleefde reflectie op zijn roerige levensgeschiedenis, zij het altijd in gesublimeerde vorm. Afkomstig uit Irak en, na een periode van oorlog en gevangenschap, uitgeweken naar Nederland, heeft hij, in de jaren dat hij werkzaam in Nederlandse ballingschap was, een groot aantal indrukwekkende werken nagelaten.

Ziad Haider studeerde begin jaren zeventig aan de kunstacademie in Bagdad.
In de twee decennia daarvoor was er in Irak een bloeiende modernistische kunstscene ontstaan. Vanaf de jaren vijftig tot in de jaren zeventig was Irak een van de meest toonaangevende landen op het gebied van moderne kunst en cultuur in de Arabische wereld. Iraakse kunstenaars als Jewad Selim, Shakir Hassan al-Said en Mahmud Sabri creëerden hun eigen versie van het internationale modernisme. Hoewel deze kunstenaars elders (vooral in Europa) waren opgeleid, trachtten zij, teruggekeerd naar hun geboorteland, een moderne kunstscene op te zetten, die zowel geworteld was in de lokale traditie, als aansloot bij de internationale ontwikkelingen. Zij creëerden hiermee een stevige basis voor een heel eigen Iraakse moderne kunsttraditie, hoezeer deze ook onder druk kwam te staan in de daaropvolgende decennia, vol met onderdrukking, oorlog en bezetting, waardoor vele Iraakse kunstenaars noodgedwongen hun werk in ballingschap moesten voortzetten.

In de tijd dat Ziad Haider studeerde kwam net het kantelpunt. Kunstenaars die lid van de regerende Ba’thpartij waren, konden, wanneer zij ook bereid waren om bij gelegenheid mee te werken met de verheerlijking van het regime en de officiële propaganda, soms een glanzende carrière tegemoetzien, tot en met de mogelijkheid tot exposeren in het buitenland. Ziad Haider, die geen lid van de Ba’thpartij was, werd na zijn studietijd meteen het leger ingestuurd.

Kort daarna, begin 1980, stortte het Iraakse regime zich in de oorlog met Iran. Vele jonge Iraki’s werden de oorlog ingestuurd om aan het front als soldaat te dienen en ook Ziad Haider trof dit lot. De Irak/Iran oorlog was een vernietigende loopgravenoorlog, waarin uiteindelijk een miljoen Iraki’s (en een miljoen Iraniërs) de dood vonden. De jaren van oorlog betekenden een lange onderbreking van Ziads loopbaan als kunstenaar. Zijn leven zou nog een veel heviger wending nemen toen hij midden jaren tachtig, gedurende een kort verlof in Bagdad, werd gearresteerd, omdat iemand over hem had geklikt bij de geheime dienst. Hij had over een portret van Saddam geplast. Voor bijna vijf jaar verbleef Ziad Haider in de beruchte Abu Ghraib gevangenis, de donkerste periode van zijn leven (1986-1990). Nadat hij was vrijgelaten werd hij weer terug het leger ingestuurd dat net Koeweit was binnengevallen. Ook de Golfoorlog van 1991 maakte hij volledig mee.

Ziad 2018 2.jpg

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Na de volksopstand tegen het regime van 1991 ontvluchtte hij Irak. Voor vijf jaar verbleef hij achtereenvolgens in Syrië en Jordanië, totdat hij in 1997 als vluchteling aan Nederland werd toegewezen. Met een paar schilderijen en een serie tekeningen, kwam hij aan in ons land, waar hij terecht kwam in Amersfoort. Na Amersfoort woonde hij voor korte tijd in Almere en vervolgens in Amsterdam. Net als voor veel van zijn lotgenoten, was het in eerste instantie niet makkelijk om zich hier als kunstenaar te vestigen. Naast dat hij doorwerkte aan zijn persoonlijke stijl, werkte hij ook veel als portrettist en tekende hij portretten van passanten op het Leidse Plein en het Rembrandtplein. Later gaf hij, samen met Paula Vermeulen, die hij in die tijd ontmoette, ook verschillende teken- en schildercursussen in hun gemeenschappelijke atelier. Ziad Haider was in deze periode zeer productief, werkte met verschillende technieken in verschillende stijlen. Juist het werken met zijn cursisten of het tekenen van portretten op straat waren voor hem een belangrijke bron levenslust, zoals hij dat een keer verklaarde voor de IKON televisie, in een documentaire uit 2003: “Een manier om de terugkerende nachtmerries te verdrijven” (Factor, Ikon, 17-6-2003, zie hier).

Ziad 2018 1.jpg

In zijn abstracte werk ging Ziad Haider juist de confrontatie aan met de heftige gebeurtenissen uit zijn leven van de jaren daarvoor. In deze werken duiken ook een paar herkenbare elementen op, die regelmatig terugkeren in verschillende werken. Een motief dat op verschillende manieren terugkeert, is de weergave van zijn voeten. Dit gegeven refereert aan verschillende gebeurtenissen in zijn leven. Als soldaat moest Ziad Haider vaak lange marsen afleggen. Toen hij uit de gevangenis werd vrijgelaten was hij de enige van zijn medegevangenen die nog amper in staat was om op zijn voeten te staan. En natuurlijk hebben zijn voeten hem verder gedragen, op zijn lange reis in ballingschap, totdat hij uiteindelijk een veilige plaats vond.

Ziad 2018 3.jpg

Het motief van de voeten is niet het enige herkenbare gegeven in Ziads werken. Vaak zijn er min of meer antropomorfe elementen te ontdekken. Deze lijken vaak versmolten met vormen die doen denken aan gloeiend metaal. Het thema mens en machine speelt in het werk van Ziad een belangrijke rol. Ook dit thema hangt vanzelfsprekend nauw samen met zijn eigen geschiedenis van oorlog en gevangenschap.
Voelbaar is in sommige werken ook de claustrofobische ruimte, die refereert aan zijn verblijf in de loopgraven, de tank en daarna de cel, al zijn deze ervaringen altijd door een transformatieproces gegaan, waardoor ze zijn te vervatten in kunst. En deze kunst heeft, ondanks de strijd, vaak een buitengewoon lyrisch karakter.

Ziad 2018 4.jpg

De in Nederland wonende Iraakse journalist, dichter en criticus Karim al-Najar over Ziad Haider: ‘For a very long time the artist, Ziad Haider, has been living in solitude, prison and rebellion. On this basis, the foregoing works constitute his open protest against the decline, triviality and prominence of half-witted personalities as well as their accession of the authority of art and culture in Iraq for more than two decades. Here we could touch the fruits of the artist’s liberty and its reflection on his works. For Ziad Haider has been able to achieve works showing his artistic talent and high professionalism within a relatively short time. We see him at the present time liberated from his dark, heavy nightmares rapidly into their embodiment through colour and musical symmetry with the different situations. It indeed counts as a visual and aesthetic view of the drama of life as well as man’s permanent question, away from directness, conventionality and false slogans’.
Hoe zeer hij ook zijn bedenkingen had bij de Amerikaanse invasie van Irak in 2003, het betekende voor Ziad wel een mogelijkheid om weer zijn geboorteland te bezoeken. In de herfst van 2003 zette hij deze stap. Zijn bezoek aan Irak maakte grote indruk en had ook zijn weerslag op de laatste serie werken die hij maakte. Allereerst veranderde zijn palet. Het intense rood, dat zijn werken voor die tijd sterk had gedomineerd, werd vervangen door sobere bruinen en grijzen. De heftige bewegingen in zijn composities maakten plaats voor een regelmatiger opbouw. Ook dat werk, uit zijn laatste reeks, is op deze tentoonstelling te zien.
Ziad heeft veel betekend als kunstenaar, maar verder was hij ook een belangrijk figuur binnen de Iraakse kunstscene in ballingschap. Zo was hij de initiatiefnemer van het de manifestatie “Ik stap over de Boog van Duisternis; Iraakse kunstenaars in Amsterdam”. Onder deze titel , die verwijst naar een zin uit een gedicht van de dichter en Ziads vriend Salah Hassan, (  “ﺃﻋﺒﺭﻗﻮﺲ ﻟﻟﻆﻻﻢ ﺃﻮﻤﻰﻋ ﻟﻟﻧﻬﺎﺭ ﺑﻌﻛﺎﺰﻱ ” , uit de bundel Een rebel met een kapot kompas, 1997), werd er in 2004 een Iraaks cultureel festival in Amsterdam georganiseerd, waarin verschillende uit Irak afkomstige beeldende kunstenaars, dichters, musici en acteurs centraal stonden.
Gedurende de jaren dat Ziad en Paula samen aan de Rozengracht woonden, was hun huis een trefpunt van vele Iraakse beeldende kunstenaars, maar ook dichters, schrijvers, musici, acteurs en journalisten. Velen zullen dierbare herinneringen koesteren aan deze roemruchte avonden. Het plotselinge overlijden van Ziad Haider in 2006 kwam dan ook als een grote klap.
Zijn werk is er gelukkig nog en verdient het om getoond te worden. Met deze tentoonstelling vieren wij wat hij als kunstenaar en als mens heeft betekend.

Floris Schreve
Amsterdam, mei 2018

Gallery Out in the Field

Verder op dit blog:

Tentoonstelling Ziad Haider (Diversity and Art)

Iraakse kunstenaars in ballingschap

Zie ook deze In Memoriam van de Iraakse kunstcriticus Amer Fatuhi

De opening:

34645923_1129592660516418_9220194087473250304_n

Van Eurabië tot de Ondergang van het Avondland Deel 1

Over Oud en Nieuw extreemrechts, Europa, Amerika, Rusland, het Midden-Oosten, rechtspopulisme en islamisme, Avondland- en Eindtijdromantiek en of het al dan niet met fascisme te maken heeft

Onlangs (eind februari 2018) bracht Geert Wilders een bezoek aan Rusland, met het doel om de banden aan te halen en een tegenwicht te bieden aan ‘de anti-Rusland-stemming’, die er in Nederland zou heersen na de MH17 crash van 2014. De reacties op dit bezoek varieerden van instemmend op GeenStijl, tot afkeurend door de nabestaanden van de MH17 ramp. Beiden overigens weinig verrassend.

Geert Wilders is niet de enige rechtspopulistische leider die warme betrekkingen onderhoudt met Putins Rusland. Marine Le Pen ging Wilders voor en ook Filip Dewinter laat zich voorstaan op zijn goede relatie met Putin. Hij bezocht zelfs de Russische troepen in Syrië, in Aleppo (zie hier zijn verslag). Overigens niet de eerste keer. Dewinter bracht al aan het begin van de opstand een vriendschapsbezoek aan Assad. Hij mocht het zelfs komen vertellen in Pauw (uitzending 7 april 2015, zie hier). Net als de Amerikaan David Duke, de vroegere Grand Wizzard van de Ku Klux Klan, een groot bewonderaar van Assad, zie hier en ook op zijn eigen site, waar hij het over het ‘Joodse IS’ heeft dat door Assad wordt verslagen. Zoiets kun je natuurlijk van de KKK verwachten, alleen lijkt deze beweging zich weer flink te roeren, nu Trump president is geworden. Trump laat zich gelaten en onweersproken door hen bewonderen (zie hier). En hoe zit het met die andere rechtextremistische Trump-bewonderaar Richard Spencer (berucht van zijn toch wel erg infantiele Hail Trump speech, met verwijzing naar de “Lügenpresse”)? Ook een operettefiguur, net als de voorman van de KKK, maar wel met connecties in invloedrijke Russische kringen. Zo haalde hij de Rus Alexander Dugin naar de VS , ogenschijnlijk een obscure en megalomane rechtsextremist met visioenen over een Groot Euraziatisch wereldrijk (zie oa hier), maar toch een belangrijk ideoloog van Putins partij. Zie dit gesprek met Dugin in Eenvandaag, uitgezonden op 11-3-2017  en hier een zeer uitgebreid interview in de nieuwe serie Onbehagen, van Bas Heijne (2018, HUMAN, volledige interview op de site, 89 minuten).

Zeer onlangs (7 april 2018)  bezocht  Dugin Amsterdam, waar hij in de Westerkerk een onderonsje had met oa Thierry Baudet (zie  hier) en journalist (?, of is het meer activist?) Wierd Duk (zie hier). De Wierd Duk, bekend van AD en Telegraaf en van diverse talkshowoptredens, waarin hij eurosceptische en anti-migratie standpunten combineert met een grote bewondering voor Putins Rusland, een combinatie die de laatste tijd vaker voorkomt. Google maar de combinatie “Duk” en “‘politieke aardverschuiving”. Of “Duk” en “MH17”. Hij kwam ook met de opmerkelijke stelling: “Rusland is geen dictatuur, want als je je niet met de politiek bemoeit heb daar een prima leven”. Een uitspraak waar nogal wat rumoer over ontstond (beluister hier Duk in discussie met Hubert Smeets).

Wat beweegt deze voorlieden van de “Patriottische Revolutie” (in de woorden van de inmiddels nogal omstreden, zo niet afgegleden journalist Joost Niemöller– aan hem, een nog iets ruigere versie van Wierd Duk, zal later nog uitgebreid aandacht worden besteed- google hem zeker in combinatie met “MH17”) om toenadering tot Rusland te zoeken? En waarom zoekt Rusland het gezelschap van uitgerekend deze lieden, die in eigen land meestal nogal omstreden zijn? En, over met lijntjes met Rusland gesproken, wat is de betekenis van dat er in Amerika, waar deze stroming betrekkelijk marginaal leek te zijn, er nu een president is gekozen, die zeker als rechtspopulistisch kan worden omschreven, maar waar uit zijn entourage ook nog verschillende lijntjes lopen naar de duistere ‘Alt-Right beweging’?

Allereerst wil met dit drieluik vooral het veld verkennen van wat je zou kunnen omschrijven als hedendaags extreemrechts, rechtspopulisme, of, zo je wilt, ‘de Patriottische Revolutie’. Het wordt geen uitputtende inventaris, ik wil hier een paar zaken langslopen en uitlichten, die mijns inziens sterk met elkaar in verband staan, in elkaar overlopen, soms tegenover elkaar lijken te staan maar aan elkaar hun bestaansrecht ontlenen. Het wordt een geen lineair betoog, maar een grillige wandeling. Hopelijk zal er aan het eind toch het een en ander duidelijk worden en kunnen er mogelijk enkele conclusies getrokken worden.

Aan de orde zal komen: de Eurabië-theorie van Bat Ye’or (waarop Wilders zich vaak beroept); het verhaal van de Groot Mufti van Jeruzalem en zijn collaboratie met Nazi-Duitsland, waarop veel pro-Israëlactivisten en anti-islamideologen zich baseren als ‘de islam’ fascistisch wordt genoemd en zelfs om deze ‘Palestijn’ en ‘moslim’ de schuld voor de Holocaust in de schoenen te schuiven; op welke  manier is het Europese fascisme daadwerkelijk van invloed is geweest in het Midden Oosten; de bronnen van het moslimfundamentalisme en van IS (en of IS wel tot het moslimfundamentalisme gerekend kan worden), het moderne apocalyptische gedachtegoed van IS in vergelijking met andere apocalyptische ideeën, die niet islamitisch van oorsprong zijn en ook weer een bloei doormaken; een andere opleving van het ondergangsdenken, maar dan de herwaardering voor Oswald Spenglers Ondergang van het Avondland binnen de conservatieve en rechtspopulistische beweging in Europa en ook Nederland. Ook de ontwikkelingen in Amerika, en dan vooral de Altright beweging zullen aan de orde komen, net als het manifest van de Noorse terrorist Anders Breivik.  En tenslotte dat het denken in ‘rasverschillen’, maar ook sekseverschillen in bepaalde kringen weer helemaal terug is.

In het onderstaande zullen deze thema’s passeren en een aantal lijntjes worden langslopen. Er zal bekeken worden of er dwarsverbanden te leggen zijn. Of juist niet. Differentiëren waar dat nodig is.

Om met misschien het heetste hangijzer te beginnen: Geert Wilders zelf heeft zich er altijd tegen verzet om tot ‘traditioneel extreemrechts’, of beter fascistisch geïnspireerd extreemrechts gerekend te worden. In de ogen van Wilders (en Martin Bosma) is Links eerder fascistisch (‘Nationaal Socialistisch’ zie je wel!), of de Islam (‘Verbied de Koran, het islamitische Mein Kampf ‘). Al werken zij tegenwoordig wel samen met partners in Europa bij wie dat soms een tikkeltje genuanceerder ligt (van de Italiaanse neofascisten, tot Front National en Vlaams Belang/voorheen Vlaams Blok).

Wat mij betreft is het verzet van Wilders en geestverwanten tegen het predicaat ‘fascisme’ maar ten dele terecht. Overigens hoor je nooit een van de aanhangers of de ‘antidemoniseerders’ het belangrijkste (en meest principiële) verschil tussen rechtspopulisten als Wilders, maar ook Fortuyn, met het twintigste-eeuwse fascisme, zoals dat van Hitler, Mussert, Mussolini of Franco uitleggen, behalve dat het heel erg is en absoluut verwerpelijk om Fortuyn, of Wilders, met een fascist als bijvoorbeeld Mussert te vergelijken. Om hen ter wilde te zijn- ik help graag een beetje- hieronder het meest belangrijke kenmerk van het fascisme, zoals het zich in de afgelopen honderd jaar heeft gemanifesteerd (echt nog nooit gehoord van iemand die verontwaardigd was over hoe Fortuyn of Wilders al dan niet gedemoniseerd werd):

Het historische fascisme (van bijvoorbeeld Mussert, maar ook Mussolini, Hitler, Franco) streefde naar afschaffing van de parlementaire democratie. Dus geen verkiezingen meer, maar een Leider, die intuïtief de Volkswil zou belichamen. En verder geen rechtsstaat meer, geen persvrijheid en al helemaal geen vrijheid van meningsuiting. Naast het bijbehorende nationalisme en eventueel racisme, of antisemitisme (bij sommige vormen van het fascisme, dus lang niet bij alle), is het voornaamste kenmerk dat de fascistische staat altijd hiërarchisch, dictatoriaal en dus niet democratisch was/is.

Zie hier. Het lijkt me duidelijk dat de rechtspopulist Wilders geen regelrechte fascist is in de traditionele zin (idem Fortuyn), Ook het bijbehorende militarisme, de vestiging van een totalitaire politiestaat en de verheerlijking van geweld zijn niet echt uitgesproken kenmerken van beide rechtspopulistische politici. Orban in Hongarije is in de Europese context misschien het enige echte grensgeval. Misschien ook een paar van de post-communistische dictators van voormalige Sovjet Republieken, die het staatssocialisme hebben ingeruild voor nationalisme. En wellicht het regime van bijvoorbeeld Bashar al-Assad (daar loopt zelfs een direct lijntje naar het historische fascisme, kom ik later op terug) Maar verder is dit wel een heel wezenlijk verschil met het 20e eeuwse fascisme. Dat niet overigens niet persé antisemitisch of zelfs racistisch was, dat was vooral de Duitse variant, het Nazisme. Het historische fascisme is overigens wel altijd radicaalnationalistisch en uitsluitend voor de ‘eigen groep’. Zoals ‘onze eigen’ NSB, in de jaren dertig, voordat (aanvankelijk meer door Rost van Tonningen dan door Mussert) de invloed van het Duitse Nationaal Socialisme sterker werd ten koste van de oorspronkelijke koers, die zich meer op het fascisme van Mussolini richtte. De NSB is wel altijd (en vooral) een partij geweest die weliswaar de parlementaire democratie wilde gebruiken om aan de macht te komen, maar deze meteen wilde afschaffen en vervangen door een autoritaire staat, met een Leider (lees: ‘Führer’, ‘Duce’) aan het hoofd.

Het is wel aardig dat ik dit niet onbelangrijke detail (dus het afschaffen van de democratie en de vestiging van een totalitaire staat) nog nooit heb mogen vernemen van aanhangers die diep gekrenkt waren als Wilders of Fortuyn door tegenstanders in de fascistische hoek werden geplaatst. Want het bovenstaande, het ‘Leidend Beginsel’, in het jargon van de NSB, is wel een wezenlijk kenmerk van het fascisme en zeker niet van toepassing op Wilders of Fortuyn, hoezeer hun beider partijen georganiseerd waren of zijn, rond de voorman/leider. Inclusief het gegeven dat het woord van de voorman in feite het politieke programma is. Maar dat is eerder ingegeven door populisme dan fascisme (het fascisme is dan ook zeker populistisch, maar niet al het populisme is fascistisch of fascistoïde). De vervanging van de democratie door een autoritair stelsel met een absoluut leider is toch wel voorbehouden aan het fascisme en kan moeilijk de recente Nederlandse rechtspopulisten worden verweten.

Ondanks dit principiële verschil met het historische fascisme, wil dit nog niet zeggen dat Wilders en de PVV geen plaats innemen binnen de hedendaagse extreemrechtse constellatie. Dat is wel degelijk het geval. Alleen is radicaal rechtse discours rond de millenniumwissel sterk verschoven. Om een belangrijk voorbeeld te noemen. Voorheen werd extreemrechts geassocieerd met antisemitisme, uiteraard vanwege het dwepen met het Derde Rijk en het ontkennen van de Holocaust. Holocaust negationisme en neo-nazisme/neofascisme gingen en gaan in regel hand in hand. Als we ons op de Nederlandse context richten dan zien wij dat Fortuyn het breekpunt is geweest tussen oud en nieuw extreemrechts. De partij van Janmaat kwam nog voort uit de echt neonazistische Nederlandse Volks Unie van Joop Glimmerveen en Janmaat heeft (sporadisch) nog contacten onderhouden met de Weduwe Rost van Tonningen.

Dat was bij Fortuyn heel anders. Fortuyn moest niets hebben van antisemitisme, was uitgesproken voor homorechten (Filip Dewinter heeft nog een keer verklaard dat hij dat van Fortuyn ‘betreurde’, letterlijk: “Kijk, Fortuyn was natuurlijk een verschrikkelijke nicht-dat vinden wij hier wat minder- maar sommige van zijn ideeën…”, zoiets was het in mijn herinnering, niet meer terug te vinden in een uitzending van EenVandaag) en heeft zichzelf altijd verre gehouden van bestaande extreemrechtse clubs. Bij sommige van zijn navolgers in de LPF lag dat weleens anders, zoals de warme contacten tussen Hilbrand Nawijn en Filip Dewinter, maar dat staat uiteraard los van Fortuyn zelf, die daar heel duidelijk over was. Fortuyn moest niets hebben van bijvoorbeeld Le Pen, maar wel weer van Berlusconi- ik denk dat hij (in sommige opzichten) meer in die hoek te plaatsen was.

Verdonk is achteraf misschien een soort tussenstation geweest (tussen Fortuyn en Wilders dan), hoewel zij qua ideeën eigenlijk niets voorstelde, itt haar tegenspeelster Ayaan Hirsi Ali,  die zich later nestelde in de neoconservatieve circuits die een tijd lang Wilders zouden steunen, al is zij daar weer vanaf gestapt, maar de ideologische loopbaan van Hirsi Ali kent nu eenmaal een grillig verloop.

Wilders en recenter zeker ook Baudet met zijn Forum voor Democratie manifesteren zich veel nadrukkelijker in het extreemrechtse circuit dan hun rechtspopulistische voorgangers vanaf Fortuyn, zoals hierna uitgebreid aan de orde zal komen.

Eurabië

Gedurende ongeveer de afgelopen vijftien jaar zijn er twee samenzweringstheorieën die telkens opduiken in het narratief van het nieuwe (post 9/11) rechtse anti-islam activisme, of het nu hier bij Geert Wilders is, of in de VS bij Pamela Geller, bij de in 2013 overleden emeritus hoogleraar Arabisch en islamkunde Hans Jansen, andere soms meer academische dan wel activistische auteurs als Andrew Bostom, Lars Hedegaard, Robert Spencer, Ibn Warraq, Daniel Pipes, Douglas Murray, of (in Nederland) ghostwriters Barry Oostheim en E.J. Bron, tot en  met de Noorse blogger Fjordman en in het manifest van de Noorse massamoordenaar Anders Breivik.

Het gaat hier om: 1. het begrip Eurabië (het Europese continent zou steeds meer geïnfiltreerd zijn door Arabische en islamitische krachten en hun welwillende handlangers) en 2.  De historische figuur Hajj Amin al-Hussayni, de vroegere Groot Mufti van Jeruzalem die zo’n invloed op Hitler zou hebben gehad dat hij de ware initiator van de Europese Holocaust was.

Beide verhalen duiken nog altijd zeer regelmatig op, al is de Eurabië theorie in PVV kring wat naar de achtergrond geraakt, sinds Wilders minder gesteund lijkt te worden uit Amerika en zich meer is gaan richten op ‘traditioneel extreemrechts’ in Europa (sinds hij de samenwerking heeft gezocht met Le Pen, de Winter en andere vertegenwoordigers van ‘oud-extreemrechts’). Er lijkt zelfs sprake van een koersverlegging. Tot voor kort zetten Wilders en de PVV zich juist af tegen Neonazi’s, waren zij fel pro-Israël- eigenlijk de koers van anti-islamitisch activistisch rechts in de VS en de rechterkant van het Israëlische politieke spectrum- maar tegenwoordig worden er zelfs zaken gedaan met partijen die een lange geschiedenis hebben op het gebied van Holocaust-negationisme. Alhoewel, tegenwoordig heeft zelfs de premier van Israël Bibi Netanyahu daar minder problemen mee- met zijn omhelzing van de theorie van de Groot Mufti sluit hij zich in feite aan bij Holocaustontkenners als David Irving (op dit blog in een ander verband uitgebreid besproken, zie hier), die ook de theorie van de Goot Mufti erbij heeft gehaald om de Nazi’s een alibi te verschaffen.

Maar eerst Eurabië, de samenzweringstheorie van de anti-islam activsite en schrijfster Bat Ye’or. Hans Jansen was zo’n beetje haar belangrijkste ambassadeur in Nederland en heeft ook Geert Wilders bij haar geïntroduceerd (een eerdere poging van Jansen om haar aan Ayaan Hirsi Ali te koppelen mislukte jammerlijk- beide dames vlogen elkaar meteen in de haren, zoals we zouden kunnen opmaken uit Jansens verslag, zie hier ). Wilders verwijst veel naar de Eurabië-theorie, bijvoorbeeld ook in zijn verklaring die hij tijdens zijn proces hield (zie hier).

Wie is de bedenker van de Eurabië-theorie? Bat Ye’or (in het Hebreeuws ‘Dochter van de Nijl’) is het pseudoniem van Giselle Littman-Orebi, een in 1933, in Egypte geboren schrijfster en activiste van Joodse afkomst. In 1955 ontvluchtte zij, vanwege de oorlog met Israël, zoals zoveel Egyptische joden haar geboorteland en kwam terecht in Engeland. In 1960 verhuisde zij naar Zwitserland. Met haar man, voormalig VN medewerker en later vooral pro-Israël/anti-islam activist David Littman (overleden 2012), vestigde zij zich in Lausanne, waar zij nog altijd woont en werkt.

Bat Ye’or werd bekend van het begrip ‘Dhimmitude’, een thema waaraan zij twee boeken wijdde, The Dhimmi: Jews & Christians Under Islam (1985) en The Decline of Eastern Christianity: From Jihad to Dhimmitude (1996). Hoewel de term ‘Dhimmitude’ meestal met mevrouw Litmann in verband wordt gebracht, werd deze term ook in 1982 gebezigd door Bashir Gemayel, de Libanese Christelijke Falangistische leider en vroegere president (vermoord in 1982). Naar alle waarschijnlijkheid heeft zij dit begrip aan Gemayel ontleend.

‘Dhimmitude’ is afgeleid van ‘Dhimmi’, een begrip dat in de islam staat voor de ‘andere gelovigen van het Boek’, dus de Joden en de Christenen. Binnen de traditionele islam hebben de Joden en Christenen door de eeuwen heen een soort status aparte gehad. Omdat zij ook een Abrahamitische godsdienst aanhingen werden zij getolereerd/gedoogd, mits zij extra belastingen betaalden. Door de eeuwen heen zijn er grote verschillen geweest, ook per staat, regime. Maar van de Khaliefen tot de sultans, dit is min of meer de status van deze minderheden geweest.

Bat Ye’or betoogt, vaak niet ten onrechte, dat de status van joden en christenen vaak niet zo rooskleurig is geweest. Zij waren vaak chantabel en afhankelijk van de grillen van de islamitische meerderheid en er werd vaak misbruik van die macht gemaakt, tot verschillende gruwelijke georganiseerde pogroms aan toe.

Met ‘Dhimmitude’ bedoelt Bat Ye’or de nederige attitude van joden en christenen naar de eisen van de moslims, vroeger en nu. Zij stelt dat de westerse wereld veel te slap is naar de wereld van de islam, naar de islamitische landen en naar de migrantengemeenschappen in de westerse wereld. In het denken van Bat Ye’or hebben de ‘politiek correcte elites’ en opiniemakers zich al min of meer overgegeven aan de moslims en lijden zij daarmee aan Dhimmi-gedrag, of ‘Dhimmitude’, zoals zij dit ‘ziektebeeld’ (zij ziet ‘Dhimmitude’ als een vorm van decadentie of cultureel verval van het westen) diagnosticeert.

In het denken van Bat Ye’or is Europa verweekt geraakt en weerloos tegen het agressieve imperialisme van de islamitische wereld. Dit imperialisme is klassiek imperialisme, bijv. dmv militaire verovering en onderwerping, maar zou sluipenderwijs gaan, een soort verovering zijn onderop. Doordat er steeds meer migranten uit de islamitische wereld de verschillende Europese landen bevolken, zouden zij langzaam maar zeker de westerse cultuur ondermijnen en die zelfs vervangen door de cultuur van hun landen van herkomst. Zij zouden hierbij dankbaar worden geholpen door politiek correcte fellow-travellers. Eigenlijk zijn in haar optiek Israël (dat de permanente islamitische terreurdreiging het hoofd moet bieden) en een neoconservatief Amerika (dat nog niet is aangetast door het decadente cultuurrelativisme) de enige machten die de afgelopen decennia dit proces enigszins hebben kunnen tegenhouden.

Zie hier het denken van Bat Ye’or, zoals ze dat vooral uiteen heeft gezet in haar bekendste werk Eurabia; the Euro-Arab Axis, uit 2005, in het Nederlands verschenen als Eurabië, de geheime banden tussen Europa en de islamitische wereld (Meulenhoff, 2007), met een voorwoord van Hans Jansen (voorwoord hier te downloaden).

De centrale these van Eurabië komt, zo simpel mogelijk samengevat, op het volgende neer: de Europese Unie zou een serie van geheime vriendschapsverdragen met de Arabische Liga hebben gesloten, geïnitieerd door Charles de Gaulle, bedoeld als tegenwicht naar de Amerikaanse (en Israëlische) invloed. In ruil voor goedkope olie zou Europa zichzelf openstellen als missiegebied voor de islam en onbeperkt migranten toelaten. En Europa zou verder een ‘Israël-kritische’ koers varen.

Ik denk dat er veel bezwaren zijn in te brengen tegen Bat Ye’ors Eurabië. Dat is ten eerste dat het wel heel erg veel knip en plakwerk is. Dat er ergens een vriendschappelijke top wordt gehouden, waarna plechtig wordt verklaard dat er dialoog moet worden aangegaan tussen de landen van beide kanten van de Middellandse Zee wil nog niet zeggen dat zoiets daadwerkelijke politieke betekenis heeft. Er gebeuren wel meer symbolische flauwekul dingen. Onze monarch deelt geregeld een of andere ridderorde uit aan een buitenlands staatshoofd, of ontvangt er een soortgelijk huldeblijk uit de handen van een bevriende collega, of president, ed. Meestal zijn dat niets meer dan symbolische gestes. En zelfs als het meer inhoud heeft, dan nog kun je je afvragen hoe doorslaggevend dat is voor de totale buitenlandse politiek van de verschillende Europese landen.

Alleen, dat wil nog niet zeggen dat deze ‘topontmoetingen’, verdragen, etc. de politieke verhoudingen ingrijpend hebben beïnvloed, vooral ten nadele van Israël. Dat is, ook vanuit Europa, bijna net zo eenzijdig geweest als vanuit de VS. In die zin blaast Bat Ye’or kleine dingen op tot immense proporties, waar zij veel lawaai over maakt (oa, want volgens mij vertelt zij ook veel onzin). Zo’n verhaal kun je natuurlijk optuigen met heel veel voetnoten, maar heeft het ook werkelijke substantie? Zie hier een aspect van de methode Bat Ye’or.

En dan, ten tweede, de conclusies die zij aan dit alles verbindt. Alsof er een systematisch geheim plan bestaat in de Arabische wereld of bij de Organisatie voor Islamitische Landen om op slinkse wijze Europa over te nemen. Er is veel aan de hand in en met de Arabische wereld, maar ondanks alle retoriek uit de tijd van het Pan Arabisme is het nog nooit gelukt om een vuist te maken. Op alle niveaus bestaat er zo’n beetje onenigheid en diepe verdeeldheid. Europa, zowel toen als nu, is daar nog een schijntje bij. Dus een megalomaan project als ‘Eurabië’ lijkt me om die reden al een luchtkasteel. Er is wel veel mis, maar dat nou net weer niet. Niet omdat sommige mensen dat niet zouden willen, maar omdat het onmogelijk is om te realiseren. En het zijn in het algemeen nogal zwakke staten, die nog maar vrij recent tot stand zijn gekomen. Zelfs al is de intentie er (en ik denk niet een dat die breed gedragen zou worden), dan nog lopen de belangen van die landen zo uiteen, dat een Eurabië project niet realistisch is.

Nog een derde punt. Het is natuurlijk zeker zo dat Europa de banden met diverse foute regimes daar in de regio heeft aangehaald ivm olie. Maar, en dat negeert Bat Ye’or, dat geldt misschien in nog veel sterkere mate voor de VS. Plus dat de VS ook nog allerlei strategische belangen hebben en hadden (gedurende de koude Oorlog). Als er nou een mogendheid is geweest die heeft gedeald met radicale of foute moslimextremisten, is het de VS wel, zie het Afghanistan verhaal. Ayman al-Zawahiri werd in Egypte vrijgelaten om daar te gaan vechten. Bovendien, dat is bijna iedereen vergeten (heeft niets met de islamisten te maken, maar wel met Irak), in 1963 steunden de VS oa Saddam Hussein en de toen nog marginale Ba’thpartij in hun coup tegen de pro-Russische generaal Abd al-Karim Qassem. Nu heeft Frankrijk daar ook nog rare dingen gedaan, maar dat is toch iets anders dan de Eurabië-theorie. Maar het idee dat Europa een soort anti-Israëlische politiek zou hebben gevoerd, in het voordeel van de ‘Eurabische elementen’ die daar baat bij zouden hebben gehad, op z’n zachtst gezegd is dat nogal een vertekende (zoniet zwaar vervormde) versie van de geschiedenis.

Andere zaken hebben veel meer de boventoon gevoed, zoals de Koude Oorlog, of de Amerikaanse steun aan Israël. Daartegenover natuurlijk de Russische steun aan het Syrië van de Assads, die voortduurt tot op de dag van vandaag. Die dingen zijn veel belangrijker geweest dan die sinistere Eurabische netwerken, waar Bat Ye’or het over heeft. Dat was mijn derde belangrijkste bezwaar. In serieuze wetenschappelijke kringen wordt Bat Ye’ors Eurabië meestal gezien als brandhout en ik denk terecht.

In de islamkritische, neoconservatieve of rechtspopulistische subcultuur heeft het werk van Bat Ye’or een enorme cultstatus. Het begrip Eurabië heeft in die kringen een hoge vlucht genomen. Het speelt ook een cruciale rol in het manifest van Anders Breivik.

Het idee van een politiek-correcte elite, die andere belangen zou dienen dan die van ‘het volk’ en bereid is om de belangen van het volk op te offeren (de EU!) en om het uit te leveren aan barbaarse krachten uit den vreemde (de moslims!), het is de rode draad in het gedachtegoed van Geert Wilders. Maar ook bij Baudet vinden we precies dit concept terug. En, in ieder geval hetzelfde patroon, maar ingevuld met iets andere begrippen, bij Trump

Lees zeker Eildert Mulder, Eurabië ligt aan de Middellandse Zee (10-9-2011), uit zijn serie uit Trouw, later verschenen in Anders Breivik is niet alleen

Bat Ye’or talks with Pamela Geller

Geert Wilders tijdens zijn proces: Overal in Europa gaan de lichten uit

Ian Buruma, Eurabia, Truth or Paranoia?

Modern Holocaust Revisionisme

En dan het verhaal dat Haj Amin al-Husayni, de Groot Mufti van Jeruzalem (1897-1974), de belangrijkste inspirator/initiator zou zijn geweest voor de Holocaust. Jansen, Bosma en Wilders sluiten zich hiermee aan bij een trend die al wat langer gaande is. Wie verschillende zg Hasbara sites al een tijdje volgt (pro-Israëlische propaganda-sites, die vaak gesteund worden door het Israelische ministerie van ‘Voorlichting/Publieke Diplomatie’, oftewel ‘Hasbara’) moet bekend zijn met dit verhaal.

Het is waar dat Haj Amin al-Husayni, nadat hij was vertrokken uit Palestina, in contact kwam met de Nazi’s, waarmee hij op verschillende manieren samenwerkte. Eerst in Bagdad, gedurende de coup van de pro-Nazistische officieren van de Gouden Vierhoek, olv generaal Rashid Ali. De coup vam de Gouden Vierhoek was overigens een belangrijke inspiratiebron voor de oprichters van de Ba’thpartij Michel Aflaq en Salah al-Din Bittar. Een van de lagere officieren die bij deze coup was betrokken, was een zekere Khairallah Tulfah, die in die tijd sterke Nazi-sympathieën ontwikkelde en een obscuur manifest schreef ‘De drie dingen die God nooit geschapen mocht hebben; Joden, Perzen en vliegen’. Khairallah Tulfah zou zeker vergeten zijn (na zijn gevangenisstraf en oneervolle ontslag uit het leger, werd hij onderwijzer in Tikrit), als hij niet de oom en vooral de voogd zou zijn geweest van de toen jonge Saddam Hussein, op wie hij een beslissende invloed had. Overigens resoneert een echo hiervan nog door in het gedachtegoed van IS, dat misschien veel minder orthodox islamitisch is en veel meer geworteld is in deze vorm van Arabisch nationalisme. Dit zal later aan de orde komen.

De coup van de Gouden Vierhoek in Bagdad mislukte en al-Husayni vluchtte naar Berlijn. Daar maakte Hitler hem tot hoofd van een SS divisie, bestaande uit voornamelijk Bosnische moslims, die gruwelijke oorlogsmisdaden hebben begaan.

Na de oorlog wist de Mufti de Neurenberger processen, waar hij terecht had moeten staan, te ontkomen en vluchtte hij naar het Midden-Oosten. In 1974 overleed hij in Libanon.

Het staat niet ter discussie dat de Mufti een bijzonder kwalijke rol heeft gespeeld, dat hij een oorlogsmisdadiger was, etc. Alleen, itt wat veel pro-Israël en anti-islamactivisten en hun meelopers beweren, de Mufti is niet degene geweest die met het idee van de Holocaust is gekomen. Dat was namelijk Hitler zelf. Hij heeft het idee van gifgas voor Joden al geopperd in Mein Kampf. Bovendien was al ruim voor de Wanseee Konferenz (en de ontmoeting met de Groot Mufti) al een begin gemaakt met de fysieke vernietiging van de Europese Joden. Er bestonden zelfs al gaskamers, zoals in Belzec, en ook Babi Yar had al plaatsgevonden. Hitler had toen al zelf talloze toespraken gehouden waarin hij opriep tot de vernietiging en totale uitroeiing van de joden, ook met gifgas.

Maar net als de inmiddels allang afgeschreven Holocaustontkenners David Irving, Robert Faurisson en Ernst Zündel (in een ander verband eerder op dit blog behandeld), kunnen ook de nieuwe Holocaustrevisionisten met een eigenlijk anti-islamitische agenda moeilijk geloven dat de Nazi’s en niet iemand anders, zoals bijvoorbeeld de eeuwige moslims, verantwoordelijk zijn voor de massale vernietiging van de Europese Joden.  Hitler had dat natuurlijk nooit zelf niet kunnen bedenken; hij moet haast wel zijn ingefluisterd door een niet-Arische en eigenlijk Semitische Arabier… Ook Hitler, die trouwens links was volgens Martin Bosma, is kennelijk slachtoffer van demonisering.

Er is overigens geen serieuze historicus van het Derde Rijk die de Groot Mufti zo’n cruciale rol toedicht. Allan Bullock, Sebastian Haffner, Joachim Fest, Ian Kershaw geen van hen heeft het bij mijn weten zelfs over de Groot Mufti (althans, volgens mij wordt hij zelfs door geen van hen genoemd, maar dat zou ik misschien nog een keer moeten nazoeken). Maar het verhaal van de Groot Mufti (als bedenker van de Holocaust), duikt eigenlijk alleen op in ranzig propaganda-materiaal, of in Nederland bij auteurs/opiniemakers als Carel Brendel en Hans Jansen. Of Martin Bosma. De op dit blog uitgebreid behandelde pro-Israel activiste Ratna Pelle is ook niet zuinig in haar gebruik van het verschijnsel Groot Mufti.

Er zijn ook serieuze auteurs over het Midden-Oosten (zoals Charles Tripp, Robert Fisk of Hanna Batatu) die uitgebreid over de Mufti hebben geschreven. Ook zeer kritisch en zonder zijn collaboratie met Hitler te verdoezelen. Maar geen van hen maakt de Mufti tot de bedenker of inspirator van de Holocaust. De Mufti was zonder twijfel een Nazi-collaborateur, een Nazi-oorlogsmisdadiger, maar geen hoofdrolspeler, laat staan een sleutelfiguur. Zijn invloed is zeker betekenisvol geweest in het Midden Oosten (zoals op de Ba’thpartij en vooral Saddam Hussein), maar niet op het verloop van de Tweede Wereldoorlog in Europa of op de Holocaust.

http://www.volkskrant.nl/buitenland/merkel-tegen-netanyahu-holocaust-is-wel-onze-verantwoordelijkheid~a4168563/

De Partij van de Liefde

“Het nieuwe fascisme draagt een baard”, zei oorlogscorrespondent Arnold Karskens in de talkshow van Pauw, op 22 september 2014., nav de wandaden van Islamitische Staat (zie hier). Heeft hij gelijk en is IS een manifestatie van ‘fascisme’? Wat mij betreft heeft Karskens maar een beetje gelijk, zij het indirect en op een iets andere manier dan hij wellicht zelf bedoelde.

Hoewel het hiervoor besproken verhaal van de Groot Mufti misschien wel het bekendste is (vooral omdat het zo gespind is door de Israël Lobby en door westerse anti-islamactivisten, zo erg dat het gezonken cultuurgoed is geworden, dat het inmiddels zelfs op GeenStijl rondwaart), is dit zeker niet het enige en al helemaal niet de belangrijkste link tussen het Europese fascisme en politieke bewegingen/stromingen in het Midden Oosten. Want hoe zit het met de oorsprong van het regime van Assad? Want juist de Baathpartij (zowel de Syrische van Assad als de Iraakse van Saddam Hussein) kent een min of meer op het fascisme geïnspireerde oorsprong.

De Ba’thpartij werd opgericht door Michel Aflaq, een Christelijke Syriër. Aflaq werd in 1910 in Damascus geboren in een Syrische Grieks Orthodoxe familie. Hij groeide op in de jaren dat Syrië een Frans mandaatgebied was, een resultaat van de opdeling van het Osmaanse Rijk na de Eerste Wereldoorlog, een gegeven dat zijn politieke vorming sterk zou beïnvloeden. In de jaren dertig studeerde hij geschiedenis aan de Sorbonne Universiteit in Parijs.

Aanvankelijk was Aflaq Marxist, maar in de loop van de jaren dertig raakte hij sterk beïnvloed door de Duitse denkers van de romantiek (vooral Gottfried Herder) en in toenemende mate het fascisme van Mussolini in Italië. Terug in Damascus, waar hij docent werd op een Franse eliteschool, begon hij zijn carrière als politiek denker/activist/agitator. Hij werd actief in de revolutionaire ondergrondse van het Arabisch nationalisme. Begin jaren veertig richtte hij samen met de soenniet Salah Eddine al-Bitar en de Shiiet Zaki Arsuzi de Pan Arabische Ba’th Partij op, voluit al-Hizb al Ba’th al-Arabi al-Ishtiraki (حزب البعث العربي الاشتراكي), ‘de Socialistische Partij van de Arabische Herrijzenis’. Ba’th, “herrijzenis” of “wedergeboorte” stond tegenover het Europese Imperialisme. De Ba’thpartij was natuurlijk een reactie op de nasleep van de Eerste Wereldoorlog, die voor de Arabieren, ondanks dat zij aan de geallieerde zijde hadden meegevochten tegen het Osmaanse Rijk, bijzonder nadelig was uitgevallen. De Arabieren kregen geen onafhankelijk aaneengesloten gebied, onder het gezag van Koning Faisal, maar het gebied werd verdeeld in een Frans en een Brits mandaat (het geheime Sykes-Picot akkoord van 1916, in 1920 geïmplementeerd). Syrië en Libanon gingen naar Frankrijk, Palestina, Trans Jordanië en Irak naar Engeland. Aan de geforceerde en kunstmatige grenzen van deze staten hebben sindsdien een heleboel conflicten ten grondslag gelegen, eigenlijk tot op de dag van vandaag. De recente vorming van Islamitische Staat, dwars door de grenzen van Syrië en Irak werd mede gemotiveerd als een rechtzetting van dit onrechtmatige en opgelegde verdrag.

Het was onder meer deze verdeling van de Arabieren waar Aflaq en de Ba’thpartij tegen ageerde. Er moest een Pan-Arabische Eenheid komen, los van de door de imperialisten opgelegde landgrenzen. De drie zaken waar de Ba’thpartij tegen ageerde waren: Imperialisme, Zionisme (de vorming van een Joodse Staat in Palestina), en ‘de Arabische Reactie’, waarmee de conservatieve monarchieën werden bedoeld, die in de ogen van de Ba’th een belemmering vormden voor de vooruitgang en de Arabische wederopstanding. De slogan van de partij was “Eenheid, Vrijheid, Socialisme”. Eenheid bedoeld als eenheid van alle Arabieren, die een Natie vormden en zich moesten ontdoen van de koloniale grenzen. Vrijheid bedoeld als vrij van imperialistische overheersing en Socialisme als saamhorigheid, sociale rechtvaardigheid en emancipatie (overigens nadrukkelijk niet Marxistisch). Op het eerste gezicht begrijpelijke of gerechtvaardigde eisen, zeker in het licht van die tijd. De Ba’thpartij was trouwens seculier en profileerde zich vooral als een partij voor Arabieren, ongeacht de religieuze afkomst/overtuiging. Het Pan-Arabisme stond, in de oorspronkelijke ideologie althans, centraal (onder respectievelijk Saddam en Assad zouden regionalisme, nationalisme en vooral tribalisme steeds meer de boventoon voeren, maar dat was niet de oorspronkelijke koers van Aflaq)

Maar Aflaqs ideeën bevatten ook andere elementen, die niet direct zijn terug te voeren op een Arabische, Islamitische of regionale traditie, maar die duidelijk geworteld zijn in het Europese politieke denken van de jaren twintig en dertig, vooral het fascisme. In Fi Sabil al Ba’th (“The Path to Resurrection”), uit 1941, het belangrijkste geschrift van de Ba’thpartij, klinkt regelmatig de roep om een sterke leider, die de partij en de samenleving voortdurend bij de les houdt en in een permanente staat van strijd stort:  “The Leader, in times of weakness of the ‘Idea’ and its constriction, is not one to substitute numbers for the ‘Idea’, but to translate. numbers into the ‘Idea’; he is not the ingatherer but the unifier. In other words he is the master of the singular ‘Idea’, from which he separates and casts aside all those who contradict it.”

Aflaqs formulering van nationalisme doet net zo fascistoïde aan: “Nationalism is love before anything else. He who loves doesn’t ask for reasons. And if he were to ask, he would not find them. He who cannot love except for a clear reason, has already had this love wither away in himself and die (…) In this struggle we retain our love for all. When we are cruel to others, we know that our cruelty is in order to bring them back to their true selves, of which they are ignorant. Their potential will, which has not been clarified yet, is with us, even when their swords are drawn against us”.

Nationalisme als onvoorwaardelijke liefde. Een irrationele overgave aan de Natie en haar Leider, in een systeem waarin foltering en andere wreedheden gezien worden als loutering, therapie zelfs en het individu geofferd kan worden voor een hoger ideaal, dat slechts door de Leider kan worden vastgesteld. Fascistischer kan bijna niet. Zie voor meer over de ideologie van Aflaq en hoe deze zich verhield tot de werkelijke politiek van zowel Assad als Saddam Hussein (vooral de laatste), Bloed en Bodem van de Ba’ath, van arabist Leo Kwarten uit de NRC (3-5-2003). Er is trouwens recent een Nederlandse politicus opgestaan die zijn partij, net als Aflaq, ook ‘de Partij van de Liefde’ noemde en in het verlengde daarvan zeker nationalisme (of patriottisme) beschouwt als een vorm van liefde. Ik neem aan dat het op toeval berust, tenminste niet dat er in dit Nederlandse partijtje het Ba’thistische gedachtegoed leeft. Maar opmerkelijk is het wel, Dit partijtje (waarvan enkele lieden zich wel lovend over Assad hebben uitgelaten), komt later nog uitgebreid aan de orde. Terug naar Aflaq en de Ba’thpartij.

Uiteindelijk vonden in zowel Syrië en Irak in 1963 staatsgrepen plaats die in beide landen de partij aan de macht hielpen. In Irak trouwens voor korte duur, omdat het leger ingreep en de Ba’thi’s weer aan de kant zette. In 1968 wist de Iraakse tak van de Ba’thpartij weer aan de macht te komen en ditmaal deze te behouden, tot de val van Saddam Hussein na de Amerikaanse invasie van 2003. Maar hoe dan ook, Aflaqs notie van de “Republiek der Liefde” culmineerde uiteindelijk in het Irak van Saddam Husseun en het Syrië van Hafez al-Assad en zijn zoon Bashar, al is de uiteindelijke invloed van Aflaq groter geweest op het Iraakse dan op het Syrische regime. Met de machtsgreep van Hafez al-Assad in 1970 volgde namelijk een grote zuivering in de Syrische Ba’thpartij, in het jargon van het Assad-regime aangeduid als de ‘correctieve revolutie’. Assad verving de partijleiding door veelal Alevietische clan en streekgenoten. Aflaq werd uit zijn eigen Syrische Ba’thpartij gezet en vertrok, na een lange omzwerving, oa via Frankrijk en Brazilië, uiteindelijk naar Irak, waar hij later door Saddam Hussein op een voetstuk werd geplaatst, tot zijn dood in 1989. Hoewel hij op het eind van zijn leven niets meer dan een symbolisch figuur was geworden, in feite onder huisarrest leefde en voor officiële gelegenheden door Saddam Hoessein op een podium werd gezet, werd hij na zijn dood door het regime geëerd, middels een groot grafmonument en enkele bronzen standbeelden, van hetzelfde soort waarvan er vele honderden van Saddam zijn vervaardigd.

Beide Ba’thistische regimes verwijderden zich elk op hun eigen manier van de oorspronkelijke ideologie. Het belangrijkste was de ambivalente relatie met het Pan-Arabisme, de Arabische eenheid, een van de belangrijkste peilers van het oorspronkelijke Ba’thisme, al bleef het Iraakse Ba’thregime, in woord althans, het idee van de Arabische eenheid het sterkst uitdragen. Maar in de praktijk vielen beide regimes terug op hun tribalistische aanhang, die in Syrië en Irak sterk van elkaar verschilde, waardoor beide regimes zelfs gezworen vijanden van elkaar werden.

Saddams dictatuur kende een mafia-achtige structuur, waarbij zijn stamverwanten de sleutelposities bekleedden. Dat was in zijn geval de tribalistische bevolking van de zg Sunnitische driehoek, van iets ten noorden van Bagdad (bijv. Falujah) tot ongeveer Mosul (waar veel van de latere aanhang van IS afkomstig was). Het regime dat de oude Assad vormgaf had eenzelfde soort tribalistische, of mafia-achtige structuur, alleen werden de sleutelposities bemand door de Alawieten van het platteland van Latakia. Ter verduidelijking, de Alawieten maken deel uit van de Shiietische tak van de islam, het is alleen binnen het Shiïsme een andere richting dan bijvoorbeeld het Twaalver-Shiisme, dat wordt aangehangen door het Mullah bewind in Iran en waartoe de meerderheid van de Shiieten kan worden gerekend, dus de Shiietische populatie van Iran, de zuidelijke helft van Irak en de meeste Shiieten in Libanon. Zie hier ongeveer het schisma tussen de Iraakse en de Syrische Ba’thisten. Hoewel er ideologisch en politiek organisatorisch grote overeenkomsten waren (beiden totalitaire politiestaten, leunend op zowel een combinatie van tribale loyaliteiten, als georganiseerd wantrouwen, door een netwerk van geheime diensten), namen zij binnen het krachtenveld van de Arabische wereld vaak tegengestelde posities in. De Iraakse Ba’th neigde meer naar het Sunnitische kamp, terwijl het Syrische regime meer aansluiting zocht in de Shiietische wereld. Zo sterk zelfs dat in de Irak/Iran oorlog het Syrië van Assad de zijde van Iran koos, als enig Arabisch land. De motieven hiervoor zijn niet zozeer religieus (het seculiere Assad regime verschilde sterk van het revolutionaire islamistische regime van Ayatollah Khomeiny, net zoals Saddams seculiere regime in veel opzichten verschilde van het Wahabitische Saudische koninkrijk), maar wel tribalistisch.   Zie hier ook de verklaring waarom het seculiere regime van Hafez al-Assad (en tegenwoordig dat van zijn zoon Bashar) de belangrijkste steunpilaar was van de shiietische fundamentalistische Hezbollah (al is tegenwoordig Hezbollah misschien wel de belangrijkste steunpilaar van het regime van Assad, dat inmiddels sterk in de verdrukking is gekomen). Eenzelfde soort relatie is het voormalige Iraakse Ba’thbewind aangegaan met verschillende sunnitische terreurbewegingen. In zo’n sterke mate zelfs dat de leiding van IS bijna als een soort ondergrondse voorzetting kan worden gezien van het oude Iraakse regime. Daarover later meer.

De conclusie is dat Arnold Karskens enigszins gelijk had toen hij nav IS stelde “Het nieuwe fascisme draagt een baard”. Zeker geen gelijk in de zin van dat ‘islam’ en ‘fascisme’ aan elkaar verwant zouden zijn (zoals oa Geert Wilders en Martin Bosma ons graag willen doen geloven), maar wel dat de ‘baarden’ van IS (in ieder geval de leiding) een soort voortzetting zijn van een fascistische beweging in het Midden Oosten.

Maar dat geldt misschien nog wel meer voor het Assad-regime, dat door verschillende westerse ‘islam-kritische conservatieven’, ‘verlichtingsfundamentalisten’, of hoe nieuw rechts zich tegenwoordig omschrijft, vaak wordt afgeschilderd als een baken tegen het islamo-fascistische gevaar. Het verband met het oude Europese fascisme is soms zelfs heel direct. Gevluchte Nazi-oorlogsmisdadigers als Walther Rauff ( die later naar Zuid Amerika vertrok en tot zijn dood ook adviseur was van de DINA, de beruchte geheime dienst van de Chileense dicator Augusto Pinochet) en vooral Alois Brunner (de rechterhand van Eichmann), die na 1945 ontkwamen naar het Midden Oosten, vonden hun nieuwe Heimat in het Syrië van Havez al-Assad. Zij speelden zelfs een rol in het opzetten van Assads geheime diensten en het orgsaniseren van het Syrische gevangeniswezen. De werkelijke erfgenamen van het Europese fascisme in het Midden Oosten zijn wellicht eerder bij zowel de Syrische als de Iraakse Ba’thpartij te vinden, dan bij de politieke islam, of de islamisten.

Over de laatsten in het volgende deel meer.

wordt zeer binnenkort vervolgd

Exhibition of Mahmoud Sabri in London (25th June – 6th July, La Galleria Pall Mall)

محمود صبري

M.Sabri_1[1]

Mahmoud Sabri (1927-2012)

This summer (25th June – 6th July) a very unique and special exhibition will be held in London: ‘Mahmoud Sabri; a retrospective’. Mahmoud Sabri (1927-2012) was one of the leading artists of Iraq, for many one of ‘the big three’ who were crucial for the Iraqi modern art movement, as mentioned by the Iraqi artist Ali Assaf (Rome), in the introduction of ‘Acqua Ferita’ (‘Wounded Water’), the catalogue of the Iraqi Pavilion at the Venice Biennial of 2011 (see also here on this blog). Unless the other two, Jewad Selim and Shakir Hassan al-Said (also discussed a few times on this blog, like here) the role of Mahmoud Sabri seems almost being erased from history. In most literature he isn’t even mentioned, or at least as a footnote, without showing one of his works. Also for me it was not easy to find a proper reproduction of one of his works, till around 2010, when his daughter Yasmin Sabri (working as a computer scientist based in London) launched a website with many of his works and writings.

The main reason that Sabri seems to be forgotten is that he was a dissident of the regime of the Ba’thparty from the very first moment. When the Ba’thists for the first time came to power, in 1963 , Sabri wrote a manifesto in which he stipulated the fascist nature of the new regime. Immediately after he went into exile. For decades he lived in Prague, during the years of the Cold War, so out of sight of Western critics and exhibition-makers, who started gradually to pay some interest in the modern art of the Middle East. Also later he became for many too much an outsider or exile, to be discussed in the history of the modern art movement of Iraq or the Middle East in general. Although he lived the last decade of his live in London, where many initiatives took place in the field of contemporary art of the Middle East, both in literature as in several exhibitions, his importance for the Iraqi modern art and contemporary art wasn’t really recognised.

He was never forgotten by many Iraqi artists. Very often I heard, when I was interviewing the Iraqi artists in exile here in the Netherlands, that Sabri was one of the greatest pioneers and an important key-figure, in pushing the Iraqi modern art forward. Many of them consider Sabri as a symbolic teacher and a source of inspiration. For example, when in 2000 thirty Iraqi artists, based in the Netherlands, came together to held a group exhibition in The Hague, they dedicated this initiative to Mahmoud Sabri.

For me it is a great pleasure to announce this wonderful initiative by Yasmin Sabri and Lamice el-Amari, professor theatre studies based in Berlin. Later this month I will visit this exhibition myself and will write an extensive article on Mahmoud Sabri, in which I also will discuss this exhibition.

From http://www.lagalleria.org/section697199.html:

 97percent_human[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, 97 percent Human

Mahmoud Sabri

Mahmoud Sabri – A Retrospective

An exhibition of the pioneering Iraqi artist Mahmoud Sabri
25th June – 6th July

The exhibition features the work of the pioneering Iraqi artist Mahmoud Sabri (1927 – 2012) and takes us through his lifetime journey, from his early work that reflected the suffering of the Iraqi people to his pursuit of a new form of art that represented the atomic level of reality revealed by modern science which he termed “Quantum Realism”.
At the age of forty, Sabri started working on the relationship between art and science, and its link to social development. In 1971 he published his Manifesto of the New Art of Quantum Realism (QR). QR is the application of the scientific method in the field of art and graphically represents the complex processes in nature. In his words, “Art is now the last area of human activity to which the scientific method is still not applied”.
His Quantum Realism collection is displayed for the first time in the UK. The exhibition presents a unique opportunity to see a comprehensive collection of Sabri’s work spanning over 4 decades.
Mahmoud Sabri was born in Baghdad in 1927, he studied social sciences at Loughborough University in the late forties. While in England, his interest in painting developed and he attended evening art classes. Following university, he worked in banking and at the early age of 32 he became the deputy head of the largest national bank in Iraq, the Al-Rafidain Bank. He resigned from the bank to take the responsibility for establishing the first Exhibitions Department in Iraq and to set up the first international exhibition in Baghdad in 1960. Following that, he decided to focus on painting, resigned from his job and went to study art academically at the Surikov Institute for Art in Moscow 1961-1963. After the Baathist coup d’état in Iraq (1963), he moved to Prague to join the Committee for the Defence of the Iraqi People. His paintings during that period reflected the suffering of the Iraqi people under that regime. From the late 60s he started working on Quantum Realism and continued to develop it until his death in April 2012 in the UK.
Mahmoud Sabri was a member of the Iraqi Avant-garde artists group. He was a founder member of the Society of Iraqi Artists. He had several publications on art, philosophy and politics (in Arabic and English). He lived most of his life in exile. (More info on QR on www.quantumrealism.co.uk )

Events
29th June, 14:00 – 15:30: Artist Satta Hashem will give a lecture and a guided tour of Sabri’s work
3rd July, 18.00 – 20.00: Symposium – Mahmoud Sabri and art in Iraq. Includes a panel discussion and documentary films

The exhibition is open 25th June – 6th July, 2013
Mon -Saturday: 11:00 – 19:00
Sunday 30th Jun: 12:00 – 18:00
Saturday 6th Jul: 11:00 – 17:00

 

La Galleria Pall Mall
30, Royal Opera Arcade
London SW1Y4UY

Extract_from_Watani_My_Country-60s[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, extract from ‘Watani’ (My Country), 1960’s

Mother[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, ‘Mother’

Hydrogen_Atom_-_1990s[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, Hydrogyn Atom (1990’s)

Air_-2[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, Air- 2

Water_._Salt_and_Vinegar[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, Water, Salt and Vinegar

More is coming after I visited the exhibition myself. See for more information: http://www.lagalleria.org/section697199.html

More on Mahmoud Sabri: www.quantumrealism.co.uk

Update (2-7-2013): An impression of the exhibition (more details will follow later)

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Mahumoud Sabri, The Hero, oil on canvas, 1963

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

 

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

photos by Floris Schreve

My Beautiful Enemy; Farhad Foroutanian & Qassim Alsaedy (exhibition Diversity & Art, Amsterdam)

Flyer/handout exhibition (pdf)

قاسم الساعدي و فرهاد فروتنیان

Qassim en Farhad

Farhad Foroutanian and Qassim Alsaedy (photo: Nasrin Ghasemzade)

My Beautiful Enemy  –  دشمن زیبای من  –  عدوي الجميل

Farhad Foroutanian &  Qassim Alsaedy

Mesopotamia and Persia, Iraq and Iran. Two civilizations, two fertile counties in an arid environment. The historical Garden of Eden and the basis of civilization in the ancient world. But also the area were many wars were fought, from the antiquity to the present.The recent war between Iraq and Iran (1980-1988) left deep traces in the lives and the works of the artists

The artists Qassim Alsaedy (Iraq) and Farhad Foroutanian (Iran) both lived through the last gruesome conflict. Both artists, now living in exile in the Netherlands, took the initiative for this exhibition to reflect on this dark historical event, which marked the recent history of their homelands and their personal lives. Neither Farhad nor Qassim ever chose being eachother’s enemies. To the contrary, these two artists make a statement with ‘My Beautiful Enemy’ to confirm their friendship.

Farhad 1

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

Farhad Foroutanian

Farhad Foroutanian (Teheran 1957) studied one and a half year at the theatre academy, before he went to the art academy of Teheran in 1975. At that time the Iranian capital was famous for its hybrid and international oriented art scene. Artists worked in many styles, from pop-art till the traditional miniature painting, a tradition of more than thousand years,  in which  Foroutanian was trained.

After his education Foroutanian found a job as a political cartoonist at a newspaper. During that time, in 1978, the revolution came, which overthrew the regime of the Pahlavi Shah Dynasty. For many Iranian intellectuals and also for Foroutanian in the beginning the revolution came as a liberation. The censorship of the Shah was dismissed and the revolution created a lot of energy and creativity. A lot of new newspapers were founded. But this outburst of new found freedom didn’t last for long; in the middle of 1979 it became clear that the returned Ayatollah Khomeiny became the new ruler and founded the new Islamic Republic. Censorship returned on a large and villain scale and, in case of the cartoonists, it became clear that they could work as long as they declared their loyalty to the message and the new ideology of the Islamic Republic.

Farhad 2

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

The artistic climate became more and more restrictive. In the mid eighties Foroutanian fled his homeland. In 1986 he arrived with his family in the Netherlands.  Since that time Foroutanian manifested himself in several ways, as an independent artist, as a cartoonist and as actor/ theatre maker (most of the time together with his wife, the actress Nasrin Ghasemzade Khoramabadi).

Farhad 3

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

In his mostly small scaled paintings and drawings Foroutanian shows often a lonely figure of a man, often just a silhouette or a shadow, who tries to deal with an alienating or even surrealistic environment. This melancholical  figure, sometimes represented as a motionless observer, sometimes involved in actions which are obviously useless or failing, represents  the loneliness of the existence of an exile. Foroutanian:

“If you live in exile you can feel at home anywhere.  The situation and location in which an artist is operating, determines his way of looking at theworld. If he feels himself at home nowhere,  becomes what the artist produces is very bizarre.

The artist in exile is always looking for the lost identity. How can you find yourself in this strange situation? That is what the artist in exile constantly has to deal with. You can think very rationally and assume that the whole world is your home, but your roots- where you grew up and where you originally belong-are so important.It defines who you are and how you will develop. If the circumstances dictates that you can’t visit the place where your origins are, that has serious consequences. You miss it. You are uncertain if you have ever the chance to see this place again. The only option you have is to create your own world, to fantasize about it. But you can’t lose yourself in this process. You need to keep a connection with the reality, with the here and now.  Unfortunately this is very difficult and for some even something impossible. You live in another dimension. You see things different than others ”.

Farhad 4

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

In his works the lonely figures are often represented with a suitcase. Foroutanian:

“A case with everything you own in it. Miscellaneous pieces of yourself are packed. And the case is never opened. You carry it from one to another place. And sometimes you open the trunk a little and do something new. But you never open the suitcase completely and you never unpack everything. That’sexile”.

Foroutanian emphasizes that his political drawings were for him personally his anker that prevented him to drift off from reality. The concept of exile is the most important theme in Foroutanian’s work, in his paintings, drawings, but also in his theatre work, like Babel (2007) or  No-one’s Land (Niemandsland, 2010). In all his expressions  the lonely figure is not far away, just  accompanied with his closed suitcase and often long shadow.

Farhad 5

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

Foroutanian participated in several exhibitions, in the Netherlands and abroad. He also worked  as a cartoonist for some Dutch magazines and newspapers, like Vrij Nederland, Het Algemeen Dagblad and Het Rotterdams Dagblad. Like Qassim Alsaedy he exhibited at an earlier occasion in D&A.

The quotes of Foroutanian are English translations of an interview with the artist in Dutch, by Floor Hageman, on the occasion of a performance of Bertold Brecht’s ‘Der gute Mensch von Sezuan’ (‘ The Good Person of Szechwan’), Toneelgroep de Appel, The Hague, see http://www.toneelgroepdeappel.nl/voorstelling/153/page/1952/Interview_met_Iraanse_cartoonist_Farhad_Foroutanian

Qassim 1

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, oil on canvas,  2009

Qassim Alsaedy

Qassim Alsaedy (Baghdad 1949) studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Baghdad during the seventies. One of his teachers was Shakir Hassan al-Said, one of the leading artists of Iraq and perhaps one of the most influential artists of the Arab and even Muslim world of twentieth century. During his student years in the seventies Alsaedy came in conflict with the regime of the Ba’th party. He was arrested and spent nine months in the notorious al-Qasr an-Nihayyah, the Palace of the End, the precursor of the Abu Ghraib prison.

After that time it was extremely difficult for Alsaedy to settle himself as an artist in Iraq. Alsaedy: “Artists who didn’t join the party and worked for the regime had to find their own way”. For Alsaedy it meant he had to go in exile. He lived alternately in Lebanon and in the eighties in Iraqi Kurdistan, where he lived with the Peshmerga (Kurdish rebels). When the regime in Baghdad launched operation ‘Anfal’ , the infamous genocidal campaign against the Kurds, Alsaedy went to Libya, where he was a lecturer at the art academy of Tripoli for seven years. Finally he came to the Netherlands in the mid nineties.

Qassim 2

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, mixed media, 2012/2013

The work of Alsaedy is deeply rooted in the tradition of the Iraqi art of the twentieth century, although of course he is also influenced by his new homeland. The most significant aspect of Alsaedy’s work is his use of abstract signs, almost a kind of inscriptions he engraves in the layers of oil paint in his works. Alsaedy:

“In my home country it is sometimes very windy. When the wind blows the air is filled with dust. Sometimes it can be very dusty you can see nothing. Factually this is the dust of Babylon, Ninive, Assur, the first civilisations. This is the dust you breath, you have it on your body, your clothes, it is in your memory, blood, it is everywhere, because the Iraqi civilisations had been made of clay. We are a country of rivers, not of stones. The dust you breath it belongs to something. It belongs to houses, to people or to some texts. I feel it in this way; the ancient civilisations didn’t end. The clay is an important condition of making life. It is used by people and then it becomes dust, which falls in the water, to change again in thick clay. There is a permanent circle of water, clay, dust, etc. It is how life is going on and on. I have these elements in me. I use them not because I am homesick, or to cry for my beloved country. No it is more than this. I feel the place and I feel the meaning of the place. I feel the voices and the spirits in those dust, clay, walls and air. In this atmosphere I can find a lot of elements which I can reuse or recycle. You can find these things in my work; some letters, some shadows, some voices or some traces of people. On every wall you can find traces. The wall is always a sign of human life”.

Qassim 3

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, mixed media, 2012/2013

The notion of a sign of a wall which symbolizes human life is something Alseady experienced during his time in prison. In his cell he could see the marks carved by other prisoners in the walls as a sign of life and hope.

Later, in Kurdistan, Alsaedy saw the burned landscapes after the bombardments of the Iraqi army. Alsaedy:

“ Huge fields became totally black. The houses, trees, grass, everything was black. But look, when you see the burned grass, late in the season, you could see some little green points, because the life and the beauty is stronger than the evilness. The life was coming through. So you saw black, but there was some green coming up. For example I show you this painting which is extremely black, but it is to deep in my heart. Maybe you can see it hardly but when you look very sensitive you see some little traces of life. You see the life is still there. It shines through the blackness. The life is coming back”.

Qassim 4

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, mixed media, 2012/2013

Another important element in Alsaedy’s mixed media objects is his use of rusted nails or empty gun cartridges. For Alsaedy the nails and the cartridges symbolize the pain, the human suffering and the ugliness of war. But also these elements will rust away and leave just an empty trace of their presence. Life will going on and the sufferings of the war will be once a part of history.

His ceramic objects creates Alsaedy together with the artist Brigitte Reuter. Reuter creates the basic form, while Alsaedy brings on the marks and the first colors. Together they finish the process by baking and glazing the objects.

Qassim 5

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, mixed media, 2012/2013

Since Alsaedy came to the Netherlands he participated in many exhibitions, both solo and group. His most important were his exhibition at the Flehite Museum Amersfoort (2006) and Museum Gouda (2012). He regularly exhibits in the Gallery of Frank Welkenhuysen in Utrecht.

Floris Schreve, Amsterdam, 2013

My Beautiful enemy

28 April- 26 May 2013

O P E N I N G op zondag 28 april om 16.00uur – deur open om 15.00 uur
door Emiel Barendsen – Programma Director Tropentheater

logo Diversity & Art

http://www.diversityandart.com/

Diversity & Art | Sint Nicolaasstraat 21 | 1012 NJ Amsterdam | open: do 13.00 – 19.00 | vr t/m za 13.00 – 17.00

عدوي الجميل

قاسم الساعدي وفرهاد فوروتونيان

يسرنا دعوتكم لحضور افتتاح المعرض المشترك للفنانين قاسم الساعدي ( العراق) وفرهاد فوروتونيان ( ايران ) , الساعة الرابعة من بعد ظهر يوم الاحد الثامن والعشرين من نيسان- ابريل 2013

وذلك على فضاء كاليري دي اند أ

الذي يقع على مبعدة مسيرة عشرة دقائق من محطة قطار امستردام المركزية , خلف القصر الملكي

تفتتح الصالة بتمام الساعة الثالثة

Een kleine impressie van de tentoonstelling (foto’s Floris Schreve):

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

tentoonstelling 2

tentoonstelling 3

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

tentoonstelling 10

tentoonstelling 7

tentoonstelling 6

Opening

Opening 2

Emiel Barendsen (foto Floris Schreve)

Dames en heren, goedemiddag,

Toen Herman Divendal mij benaderde met het verzoek een openingswoord tot u te richten ter gelegenheid van de duo expositie van Qassim Alsaedy en Farhad Foroutanian moest ik een moment stilstaan. Immers, ik ben de man die ruim 35 jaar werkzaam is in de podiumkunsten. Weliswaar altijd de niet-westerse podiumkunsten maar toch…podiumkunsten. Herman vertelde mij toen dat hij graag dit soort gelegenheden te baat neemt om anderen dan de usual suspects hun licht te laten schijnen op de tentoongestelde werken. Mooie gedachte die ik met hem deel.
Als Hoofd Programmering en interim directeur van het helaas opgeheven Tropentheater was ik in de gelegenheid om veel te reizen op zoek naar nieuwe artiesten en producties die wij belangrijk en interessant vonden om aan het Nederlandse publiek voor te stellen. In die queste ben je op zoek naar elementen die aan dat specifieke raamwerk appelleren: nieuwsgierigheid, avontuurlijkheid, vakmanschap en ambachtelijkheid, authenticiteit en identiteit maar bovenal de eigen signatuur van de makers.
Beide kunstenaars hier vertegenwoordigd vertellen ons mede op zoek te zijn naar identiteit, beide zijn gevlucht uit hun moederland , beide delen een gezamenlijk bestaan; een gedwongen toekomst. En identiteit is verworden tot een lastig te hanteren begrip in de Nederlandse samenleving anno nu. Sinds de opkomst van populistische partijen hebben wij de mondvol over dé Nederlandse cultuur en identiteit ; maar waar bestaat die in vredesnaam uit. Ik heb er de canon van Nederland nog een op nageslagen en als je het hebt over kunst en cultuur frappeert de constatering dat het juist de externe influx is geweest – en nog immer is – die ons Nederlands DNA bepaalt. Aan de vooravond van een Koningswisseling constateren we dat na de Duits-Oostenrijkse, Engelse, Franse en Spaanse adel de elite van de nieuwe wereld hun opwachting maakt in de Nederlandse monarchie. De ultieme uiting van globalisering. Argentinië nota bene een land opgebouwd uit door conquistadores verkrachte indianen aangevuld met voor armoe gevluchte Sicilianen, Ashkenazische joden, Duitse boeren , Britse gelukzoekers en nazaten van de Westafrikaanse slaven die – behalve hun ritme – de Rio de la Plata niet mochten oversteken, levert de nieuwe Koningin. Wat is onze Nederlandse identiteit eigenlijk als onze kunsthistorische canon vooral gebouwd is op het –wellicht door pragmatisme ingegeven- asiel dat wij boden aan gevluchte kunstenaars: geen Gouden Eeuw zonder Vlamingen, Hugenoten, Sefardische Joden of Armeniers. ‘Onze’ succesvolste nog levende beeldend kunstenares, Marlene Duma, is van Zuid Afrikaanse oorsprong.
Vanuit mijn vakgebied huldig ik het principe dat men tradities moet begrijpen om het hedendaagse te kunnen duiden. Dit geldt niet alleen voor de podiumkunsten maar in mijn optiek ook voor de beeldende kunst. Traditie als conditio sine qua non voor modernisering.
Over de grenzen kijken betekent vooral eerst jezelf leren kennen; wat vind ik mooi, interessant en vooral waarom? Wat zijn die verhalen die je observeert en hoort en in welke culturele context moet ik die plaatsten?
Je laten leiden door je eigen nieuwsgierigheid levert een grote geestelijke verrijking op.
‘My beautiful enemy’ is de titel van deze expositie en verwijst naar het Irak – Iran conflict uit de jaren tachtig van vorige eeuw. Twee buurlanden gebouwd op de civilisaties en dynastieën die de bakermat van onze beschaving vormen. Een gebied dat een lange geschiedenis van conflicten kent maar waar de culturele overeenkomsten groter blijken te zijn dan de verschillen. In samenlevingen waarin de kunstenaar de mond gesnoerd wordt en waar kritische noten niet meer gehoord mogen worden rest vaak maar één pijnlijke optie: ballingschap. Huis en haard worden verlaten om elders in de wereld een nieuw bestaan op te bouwen. Dit proces is voor iedere balling moeilijk en eenzaam; de geschiedenis verankerd in je geheugen is de basis waar je op terugvalt. Mijmeringen over kleuren, geuren, geluiden en smaken van je geboortegrond bijeengehouden door verhalen.
En dat zie je terug in de hier tentoongestelde werken: als ik de werken van Qassim Alsaedy observeer dan herken ik de vakman die in een beeldende taal abstracte verhalen vertelt die een appèl doen op zijn geboortegrond. Als ik mijn ogen luik verbeeld ik mij het landschap te ruiken en hoor ik bij het ene werk de zanger Kazem al Saher op de achtergrond en bij het andere poëtische werk de oud-speler Munir Bachir zachtjes tokkelen.
Farhad Foroutanian gebruikt een ander idioom en zijn stijl verraadt zijn achtergrond als cartoonist. In ogenschijnlijk een paar klare lijnen zet hij zijn figuren neer in een welhaast surreëel decorum. De man met de koffers doet mij terugdenken aan mijn eigen jeugd die ik doorbracht in Zuid-Amerika. Toen aan de vooravond van de gruwelijke Pinochet-coup in Chili de dreiging alsmaar toenam zetten mijn ouder twee koffers klaar waarin de meest noodzakelijke spullen zaten om eventueel te moeten vluchten. Paspoorten en baar geld, kleding en toiletartikelen. Wij moesten niet vluchten, gelukkig, maar werden wel verzocht het land te verlaten. Onze nieuwe bestemming werd het door een burgeroorlog geteisterde Colombia en hoewel dat geweld voornamelijk in de jungle ver van de grote steden plaatsvond waren er momenten dat dat geweld angstig dichtbij kwam. En weer stonden die twee koffers onder handbereik.
Zo blijkt dat deze werken prikkelen en vragen stellen. Het is aan het individu echter om daar invulling aan te geven . Daarover te praten met anderen levert vanzelf weer nieuwe verhalen op.
In een tijd waarin de overheid net doet of diversiteit niet meer van deze tijd is en moedwillig aanstuurt op ondubbelzinnige eenvormigheid ben ik blij dat er nog een plek in Amsterdam is waar men deze prachtige kunst kan aanschouwen.
Ik besluit met het motto “tegenwind is wat de vlieger doet stijgen” en wens Qassim en Farhad alle goeds toe. En u als publiek veel kijkgenot.

Dank u.
Emiel Barendsen

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Farhad Foroutanian en Qassim Alsaedy (foto Floris Schreve)

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

In Front (left): Qassim Alsaedy, the Dutch/Iraqi Kurdish writer Ibrahim Selman and the actress Nasrin Ghasemzade (the wife of Farhad Foroutanian)

opening 4

Bart Top, Farhad Foroutanian and Ishan Mohiddin

opening 5

The Iraqi Kudish artists Hoshyar Rasheed and Aras Kareem (who exhibited in D&A before, see here and here), Ishan Mohiddin and Jwana Omer (the wife of Aras Kareem)

De Volkskrant (vrijdag 3 mei 2013):

Volkskrant

Lecture: A history of Iraqi modern art and Iraqi artists in the Diaspora, on the occasion of the exhibition ‘Distant Dreams; the other face of Iraq’, Kunstliefde (Utrecht)

http://onglobalandlocalart.wordpress.com/2012/02/28/

Handout of my lecture on Iraqi modern art and Iraqi artists in the Diaspora, Kunstliefde, Utrecht, The Netherlands, 24 February 2012, on the occasion of the exhibition Distant Dreams;  five Iraqi artists in the Netherlands (Baldin Ahmad, Qassim Alsaedy, Salam Djaaz, Awni Sami and Araz Talib), with the addition of some of the visual material (click on the pictures to enlarge)

Introduction on the history and geography of Iraq

Origins and development of the Iraqi modern art (from 1950)

 

             

Jewad Selim              Faeq Hassan               Shakir Hassan al-Said

        

             

Mahmud Sabri             Dhia Azzawi                Rafa al-Nasiri   

         

Mohammed Mohreddin          Hanaa Mal-Allah

Art and mass-propaganda under the rule of the Ba’th Party

 

Al-Nasb al-Shaheed (‘The Martyr’s Monument’, by Ismael Fattah al-Turk)

Bab al-Nasr ( ‘Victory Arch’,  designed by Saddam Husayn and executed by Khalid al-Rahal and Mohammed Ghani Hikmet)

     

Statues and portraits of Saddam Husayn and Michel Aflaq (founder of the Ba’thparty)

 

 

Iraqi artists in the Diaspora

The Netherlands:

                

 Baldin Ahmad            Aras Kareem           Hoshyar Rasheed

                  

Araz Talib             Awni Sami          Salam Djaaz

     

Qassim Alsaedy        Ziad Haider        Nedim Kufi

 

Some Iraqi artists in other countries:

           

Rebwar Saeed (England)         Anahit Sarkes (England)

          

Jananne al-Ani (England)      Ahmed al-Sudani (United States) 

       

Walid Siti (England)       Halim Al Kareem (Netherlands/United States) 

         

Adel Abidin (Finland)         Azad Nanakeli (Italy)

    

Ali Assaf (Italy)       Wafaa Bilal (United States)

 

On the screen a work of Mahmud Sabri, one of the most experimental Iraqi artists in history

A work of Jewad Selim, more or less the ‘founder of the Iraqi modern art’

On the screen a work of Shakir Hassan al-Said, whose style influenced artists all over the Arab and even the islamic world

Left (in front) Qassim Alsaedy. Me behind the laptop. Behind me (left side) my sister Leonie Schreve and her partner Anand Kanhai. Behind them the Iraqi artist Ali Talib. Second right of me Brigitte Reuter, who created many works together with Qassim Alsaedy. On the walls (right) the work of Awni Sami

Left behind me Martin van der Randen, curator of this exhibition. Left on the wall the work of Baldin Ahmad

Floris Schreve

 فلوريس سحرافا
 
Photos during the lecture by Liesbeth Schreve-Brinkman

Tentoonstelling ‘Distant Dreams; the other face of Iraq’ (Kunstliefde, Utrecht)

http://onglobalandlocalart.wordpress.com/2012/02/05/exhibition-distant-dreams-the-other-face-of-iraq-kunstliefde-utrecht-the-netherlands-and-a-lecture-on-modern-and-contemporary-iraqi-art/

 

أحلام بعيدة، هي الوجه الآخر للعراق

معرض لخمسة فنانين عراقيين في هولندا

On Sunday February 19th in Utrecht (in the artists Society Kunstliefde) the exhibition ‘Distant Dreams, the other face of Iraq’ will be opened, an exhibition of five Iraqi artists who are living and working in the Netherlands, curated by Martin van der Randen. The participating artists are Salam Djaaz, Qassim Alsaedy, Baldin Ahmad, Awni Sami and Araz Talib , all on this blog ever mentioned or extensively discussed. On Friday, February 24 at 20:00 I will give a lecture at the exhibition on the history of modern art of Iraq and the Iraqi art in the Diaspora, in the Netherlands and elsewhere.

Here is the brochure of Distant Dreams; The other face of Iraq (both in English and Dutch)

In this blog entry, the documentation of the exhibition and the lecture will appear very soon. Below the official announcement. See also http://www.iraqiart.com/inp/view.asp?ID=1305 (Arabic):

Op zondag 19 februari wordt in de Utrechtse kunstenaarsvereniging Kunstliefde de tentoonstelling Distant Dreams; the other face of Iraq geopend, van vijf uit Irak afkomstige kunstenaars in Nederland, samengesteld door Martin van der Randen. De deelnemende kunstenaars zijn Salam Djaaz, Qassim Alsaedy, Baldin Ahmad, Awni Sami en Araz Talib, allen weleens op dit blog genoemd of uitvoerig besproken. Op vrijdag 24 februari zal ik om 20.00 bij de tentoonstelling een lezing geven over de geschiedenis van de moderne kunst van Irak en de Iraakse kunst in de Diaspora, in Nederland en elders.

Zie hier de Brochure van Distant Dreams; The other face of Iraq

In dit blogitem zal de documentatie van de tentoonstelling en de lezing verschijnen. Hieronder de officiële aankondiging.

Salam Djaaz   سلام جعاز

Qassim Alsaedy   قاسم الساعدي

Baldin Ahmad   بالدين أحمد

Awni Sami   عوني سامي

Araz Talib   آراز طالب

Lezing op 24 februari, om 20.00 in Kunstliefde, Nobelstraat 12A, Utrecht (www.kunstliefde.nl)

Floris Schreve

فلوريس سحرافا

(أمستردام، هولندا)

Opening (Sunday February 19th, 2012)

 

Qassim Alsaedy (l), Salam Djaaz (r)

Awni Sami (l), Baldin Ahmad (r)

Araz Talib

The writers/journalists Ishin Mohiddin (l), Karim Al-Najar (r)

Mrs Mayada al-Gharqoly of the Iraqi Embassy in the Netherlands. Behind her Martin van der Randen, curator of this exhibition

Mayada al-Gharqoly

Mounir Goran (ud), with the Dutch Kurdish Iraqi poet Baban Kirkuki

The Dutch Iraqi Kurdish writer Ibrahim Selman (l) with Qassim Alsaedy

From the left to the right: Baban Kirkuki, Mounir Goran, Qassim Alsaedy, Baldin Ahmad, Araz Talib, Salam Djaaz, Awni Sami

Finissage (Sunday March 18th, 2012)

Qassim Alsaedy with HE Dr. Saad Ibrahim al-Ali, Embassador of Iraq in the Netherlands

The embassador, with some other staff of the Embassy and some of the artists

Martin van der Randen with Baldin Ahmad

Baldin Ahmad and Salam Djaaz

Baldin Ahmad and Qassim Alsaedy

Baban Kirkuki, Salam Djaaz and Munir Goran

photos by Floris Schreve

An impression of the Arab contributions at the Venice Biennial 2011

http://onglobalandlocalart.wordpress.com/2011/12/09/an-impression-of-the-arab-contributions-at-the-venice-biennal-2011/

مساهمة الدول العربية في بينالي البندقية

An Impression of the contributions of several artists from the Arab world at the Venice Biennial 2011. Photos by Floris Schreve. An extensive article will follow later

The Future of a Promise

Curatorial Statement by Lina Nazaar:

“What does it mean to make a promise? In an age where the ‘promise of the future’ has become something of a cliché, what is meant by The Future of a Promise?

In its most basic sense, a promise is the manifestation of an intention to act or, indeed, the intention to refrain from acting in a specified way. A commitment is made on behalf of the promisee which suggests hope, expectation, and the assurance of a future deed committed to the best interests of all.

A promise, in sum, opens up a horizon of future possibilities, be they aesthetic, political, historical, social or indeed, critical. ‘The future of a promise’ aims to explore the nature of the promise as a form of aesthetic and socio-political transaction and how it is made manifest in contemporary visual culture in the Arab world today.

In a basic sense, there is a degree of promise in the way in which an idea is made manifest in a formal, visual context – the ‘promise’, that is, of potential meaning emerging in an artwork and its opening up to interpretation. There is also the ‘transaction’ between what the artist had in mind and the future (if not legacy) of that creative promise and the viewer. Whilst the artists included here are not representative of a movement as such, they do seek to engage with a singular issue in the Middle East today: who gets to represent the present-day realities and promise of the region and the horizons to which they aspire?

It is with this in mind that the show will enquire into the ‘promise’ of visual culture in an age that has become increasingly disaffected with politics as a means of social engagement. Can visual culture, in sum, respond to both recent events and the future promise implied in those events? And if so, what forms do those responses take?”

http://www.thefutureofapromise.com/index.php/about/view/curators_statement

The participating artists are Ziad Abillama (Lebanon), Ahmed Alsoudani (Iraq, zie ook see also this ealier contribuition) Ziad Antar (Lebanon), Jananne Al-Ani (Iraq), Kader Attia (Algeria/France), Ayman Baalbaki (Lebanon), Fayçal Baghriche (Algeria), Lara Baladi (Lebanon), Yto Barrada (France, Morocco), Taysir Batniyi (Palestine), Abdelkader Benchamma (France/Algeria), Manal Aldowayan (Saudi Arabia), Mounir Fatmi (Morocco, see this earlier contribution), Abdulnasser Gharem (Saudi Arabia), Mona Hatoum (Palestine/Lebanon), Raafat Ishak (Egypt), Emily Jacir (Palestine), Nadia Kaabi-Linke (Tunesia), Yazan Khalili (Palestine), Ahmed Mater (Saudi Arabia, see this earlier contribution), Driss Ouadahi (Algeria/Morocco) en Ayman Yossri Daydban (Saudi Arabia).

Mona Hatoum, Drowning sorrows (Gran Centenario), installatie van ‘doorgesneden’ glazen flessen, 2002, op ‘The Future of a Promise’, Biënnale van Venetië, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve

Mona Hatoum, Drowning Sorrows (detail)- photo Floris Schreve

‘Hatoum’s work is the presentation of identity as unable to identify with itself, but nevertheless grappling the notion (perhaps only the ghost) of identity to itself. Thus is exiled figured and plotted in the objects she creates (Said, “Art of displacement” 17).

‘Hatoum’s Drowning Sorrows distinctly exemplifies the “exile” Said denotes above. Drowning Sorrows displays the pain and beauty of being an exile without overtly supplying the tools with which to unhinge the paradox attached to it. It creates suggestive effects which ultimately lead the viewer towards its paradoxical ambiance. The work contains a circle of glass pieces drawn on a floor. The circle is made up of different shapes of glass flasks and, as they appear on the floor, it seems that the circle holds them afloat. The disparately angled glasses imply cuts from their sharp edges and their appearance is associated with a feeling of pain from the cut. This circle of glasses, therefore, signifies an exilic ache and embodies an authority to “figure” and “plot” the pain’.

The work signifies the reality of being unmoored from a fixed identity as the flasks are ambiguously put on a ground where they are perceived to be ungrounded. The appearance of the glasses is also unusual—we do not get to see their full shapes. As the artist’s imagination endows them with a symbolic meaning, they have been cut in triangular and rectangular forms of different sizes. These varieties of cut glasses speak of an undying pain that the exile suffers. In an exile’s life, irresolvable pain comes from dispossessions, uncertainty, and non-belonging. Being uprooted from a deep-seated identity, an exile finds him/herself catapulted into a perpetual flux; neither going back “home” nor a complete harmony with the adopted environment through adopting internally the “new” ideals is easily achievable. There exists an insuperable rift between his/her identity and locales which both are nevertheless integral parts of their identity. Hence, Hatoum portrays the exilic “identity as unable to identify with itself,” as Said puts it.

However, the glass edges above also represent that an exile’s experiences are nonetheless beautiful and worthy of celebration. The glass pieces show the experiences that an exilic traveller gathers in the journey of life. The journey is all about brokenness and difference. But an exile’s life becomes enriched in many ways by being filled up with varieties of knowledge and strengths accrued through encountering differences. Hatoum’s creation, therefore, befittingly captures these benefits by transferring them into an art work that bewitches the viewer through an unknown beauty. Being an expression of beauty, the art work is transformed into a celebration of “exile.” Despite “Drowning” in “Sorrows,” Hatoum’s work demonstrates an authority to give vent to the exilic pain through a work of beauty.

Ultimately, we see that an exile is not entirely drowned by the sorrows of loss. Notwithstanding the anguish, the exile gains the privilege to explore the conditions that create the pain; because the painfulness zeroes in on the very nature of identity formation. The exile has the privilege of reflecting on the reality surrounding his/her identity. Therefore, Hatoum’s glasses are not pieced together purposelessly; they depict the ambiguity that the exile feels towards identity. Her creative ambiguity makes us both enjoy the art and question the reality which we ourselves, exiles or not, find ourselves in. “Drowning Sorrows” shows a way to question the reality by being ambiguous towards it. Hatoum thus transmutes her exilic pain into a work of imagination which becomes an emblem of her artistic power through such suggestiveness.

From this point of view, Hatoum is an exemplary Saidian “exile” as she turns the reality of being uprooted from “home” into an intellectual power against the systematisation of identities. In Orientalism, Said distinguishes the dividing line that severs the supposedly superior Western culture from the ostensibly inferior one of the “Others.” He examines the modus operandi of such a disjunction. He studies power-structures to reveal how they dissociate cultures. Thus the Saidian “exile” develops independent criticisms of cultures in order to defeat the debilitating effects of discursivity that disconnect cultures. The “exile” thus sees the whole world as a foreign land captured in the power-knowledge nexus’.

From: Rehnuma Sazzad, Hatoum, Said and Foucault: Resistance through Revealing the Power-Knowledge Nexus? van Postcolonial Text, Vol 4, No 3 2008), see here

Emily Jacir, Embrace, 2005 (‘The Future of a Promise’, Venetië, 2011- foto Floris Schreve)

Embrace is a circular, motorised sculpture fabricated to look like an empy luggage conveyor system found in airports. It remains perfectly still and quiet, but when a viewer comes near the sculpture their presence activates the work; it turns on and starts moving. The work’s diameter refers to the height of the artist. The work symbolizes, amongst many things, waiting and the etymology of the word ‘embrace’.

Emily Jacir (statement for The Future of a Promise)

Ahmed Alsoudani, Untitled, acryl en houtskool op doek, 2010 (‘The Future of a Promise’, Venetië, 2011- foto Floris Schreve)

‘At the time I was in the tenth grade and I was spending hours reading Russian novels and poetry. Reading things like The Brothers Karamazow, The Idiot, War and Peace, Mayakovsky and Anna Akhmatova, and an anthology of poetry from the frontline of World War II- I can’t remember the title- helped me clarify my own circumstances and put the idea of leaving Iraq in my head. At that time in Iraq all ideas, even private thoughts, could land you in jail. As millions of Iraqis dreamt of leaving, I knew I had to plan carefully. (…) I left Baghdad in the middle of the afternoon and traveled by taxi to Kurdistan, which was under U.S. protection. We had to pass many heavily guarded checkpoints, but my older brother used his connections to bribe our way through. It cost him a lot of money. I stayed for a few weeks in Kurdistan, and later I met with an Iraqi opposition member who helped me cross into Syria (…) After I  escaped from Baghdad I spent four years in Syria. In the beginning life was pretty rough and lonely, but eventually I made a few friends. One in particular helped me tremendously- an Iraqi poet named Mohammed Mazlom who was a friend of my brother. He let me stay at his place in Damascus for a year and helped me get a job writing for the Iraqi opposition newspaper there. The big problem with Syria is that though they don’t bother you as an Iraqi exile, you can’t get the paperwork you need to be a legal resident either. You’re in a kind of a limbo: it’s almost if you don’t exist. I knew I would eventually have to leave there as well. In Damascus there is an office called UNHCR, which is a part of the United Nations. Every day the office is full of refugees waiting to get an application to leave. It was a complicated process but I decided after two years in this state of limbo to do it. It took almost a year of waiting but finally I got a meeting with someone from the US embassy. As someone writing for the Iraqi opposition in Syria my case was strong, and after several meetings they granted me political asylum’

(in Robert Goff, Cassie Rosenthal, Ahmed Alsoudani, Hatje Cantz Verlag, Ostfildern, Germany, 2009).

Ahmed Alsoudani, Untitled, acryl en houtskool op doek, 2010 (‘The Future of a Promise’, Venetië, 2011- foto Floris Schreve)

‘These turbulent paintings depict a disfigured tableau of war and atrocity. Although the content of the paintings draw on my own experiences of recent wars in Iraq, the imagery of devestation and violence- occasionally laced with a morbid and barbed humour-evoke universal experience of conflict and human suffering. Deformed figures, some almost indistinguishable and verging on the bestial, intertwine and distort in vivid, surreal landscapes. Figures are often depicted at a moment of transition- through fear and agony- from human to grotesque’

Ahmed Alsoudani (statement for The Future of a Promise)

Jananne Al-Ani, Aerial II, production still from Shadow Sites II, 2011 (bron: http://www.art-agenda.com/reviews/sharjah-biennial-10-plot-for-a-biennial-16-march-16-may-2011-and-art-dubai-16-19-march-2011/

The Aesthetics of Disappearance: A Land Without People – Jananne Al-Ani from Sharjah Art Foundation on Vimeo.

Jananne Al-Ani, Shadow Sites II, 2011 (The Future of a Promise, Venetië, 2011-foto Floris Schreve)

Jananne Al-Ani, Shadow Sites II, 2011 (The Future of a Promise, Venetië, 2011-foto Floris Schreve)

Jananne Al-Ani, Shadow Sites II, 2011 (The Future of a Promise, Venetië, 2011-foto Floris Schreve)

Shadow Sites II is a film that takes the form of an aerial journey. It is made up of images of landscape bearing traces of natural and manmade activity as well as ancient and contemporary structures. Seen from above, the landscape appears abstracted, its buildings flattened and its inhabitants invisible to the human eye. Only when the sun is at its lowest, do the features on the ground, the archeological sites and settlements come to light. Such ‘shadow sites’ when seen from the air, map the latent images by the landscape’s surface.  Much like a photographic plate, the landscape itself holds the potential to be exposed, thereby revealing the memory of its past. Historically, representations of the Middle Eastern landscape, from William Holman Hunt’s 1854 painting The Scapegoat (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scapegoat_(painting), FS) to media images from the 1991 Desert Storm campaign have depicted the region as uninhabited and without sign of civilization. In response to the military’s use of digital technology and satellite navigation, Shadow Sites II recreates the aerial vantage point of such missions while taking an altogether different viewpoint of the land it surveys. The film burrows into the landscape as one image slowly dissolves in another, like a mineshaft tunneling deep into substrate of memories preserved over time’.

Jananne Al-Ani (statement The Future of a Promise)

.

Ahmed Mater, The Cowboy Code, op ‘The Future of a Promise’, Biënnale van Venetië, 2011 (foto Floris Schreve)

Mater in his statement about ‘Antenna’:

“Antenna is a symbol and a metaphor for growing

up in Saudi Arabia. As children, we used to climb

up to the roofs of our houses and hold these

television antennas up to the sky.

We were trying to catch a signal from beyond the

nearby border with Yemen or Sudan; searching –

like so many of my generation in Saudi –

for music, for poetry, for a glimpse of a different

kind of life. I think this work can symbolise the

whole Arab world right now… searching for a

different kind of life through other stories and

other voices. This story says a lot about my life

and my art; I catch art from the story of my life,

I don’t know any other way”.

Ahmed Mater

Ahmed Mater, Antenna, op ‘The Future of a Promise’, Biënnale van Venetië, 2011 (foto Floris Schreve)

Spring Cleaning! By Franck Hermann Ekra (winner of 2010 AICA Incentive Prize for Young Critics):

The lost Springs, Mounir Fatmi’s minimal installation, displays the 22 flags of the states of the Arab League at half mast. In the Tunisian and Egyptian pavilions, two brooms refer to the upheavals that led to the fall of President Ben Ali in Tunisia and President Mubarak in Egypt. This evocative, subtle and trenchant work of art has been inspired by the current protests against neo-patriarchal powers in the Maghreb, the Mashriq and the Arabian Peninsula.

In the anthropology  of the state, the flag is  a symbol rich in identity and attribution. It is a part of a secular liturgy which establishes  a holy space for the politically sacred.  Mounir Fatmi seems to have captured this with his intuition of an iconic device halfway between the altar and the universalizing official dramaturgy. He gets to the core of democratic representation, on the capacity to metaphorically catalyse the civil link. There is a touch of the domestic in his contemporary heraldry.

Mounir Fatmi, Aborted Revolutions (installation), 2011-Photo Floris Schreve

The necessary cleansing that Mounir Fatmi suggests does not concern the community but rather the dictators who dream themselves as demiurges. It calls for action-creation. The Brooms ironically point to some dynamic process and stimulating imitation effect.  Who’s next? What else should be dusted? Where has the rubbish been hidden?

Though the aesthetics of sweeping, the artist testifies to some timeless spring. A standard bearer of the pan-Arabic revolutionary revivalism and its enchanting Utopia, he breaks away from the prevailing monotony of always disenchanted tomorrows, irreverently using the devices of complicity through self-sufficient references, and blurring the familiar novel and popular romance. Giving his work an essential and symbolic function, he dematerializes it, as if to repeat over and over again that symbols are food for thought’.

From ’The Future of a Promise’.

Abdulnasser Gharem, The Stamp (Amen), rubber on wooden stamp, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

‘My relationship with the urban environment is reciprocal; streets and the cities inspire a particularly critical reaction. As a socially engaged artist, I need to take back to the people, to the city, to the built environment.

In previous works I have related the story of social environments marked for destruction, regardless of the fate of the people who live in it, or of disaster arising from a misplaced trust in the security of concrete. With the current work, I turn my attention to the false promise of the manufactured modern city.

Viewing 3D models for the future cities springing up across the Gulf, focuses attention on the disjunction between the apparent utopia of the future they appear to offer and the daily, complex and problematic reality of our actual urban lives.

These cities can be a distraction, a vehicle exploited by bureaucracies who wish to divert the attention of a sophisticated population away from a reality which is not model. Through the use of stamps, I underline the inevitable stultifying and complicating effect the bureaucracy will have, even as it works to build its vision for a better society. Why do we look to an utopian future when we have social issues we need to address now? I am not opposed to this brave new world but I want to see governments engage with the streets and cities, and the problems of their people, as they are now. Why built new cities when there are poor people we need to look after? This is a distraction: we should not be afraid to change.

Abdulnasser Gharem  (statement for The Future of a Promise)

http://www.dailymotion.com/embed/video/xnbbqj
Saudi artist captures Arab Spring door CNN_International

Manal Aldowayan, Suspended Together, installation, 2011 (detail)

On Manal Al-Dowayan:

Suspended Together is an installation that gives the impression of a movement and freedom.

However, a closer look at the 200 doves brings the realization that the doves are actually frozen and suspended, with no hope of flight. An even closer look shows that each dove carries on its body the permission document that allows a Saudi woman to travel. Notwithstanding the circumstances, all Saudi women are required to have this document, issued by their appointed male guardian.

The artist reached out to a large group of leading female figures from Saudi Arabia to donate their permission documents for inclusion in this artwork. Suspended Together carries the documents of award-winning scientists, educators, journalists, engineers, artists and leaders with groundbreaking achievements that contributed  to society.  The youngest contributor is six months old and the oldest is 60 years old. In the artist’s words: ‘regardless of age and achievement, when it comes to travel, all these women are treated like a flock of suspended doves’.

http://universes-in-universe.org/eng/bien/venice_biennale/2011/tour/the_future_of_a_promise/manal_al_dowayan

Manal Aldowayan, Suspended Together, installation, 2011

Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Flying Carpets, installation, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

The Flying Carpet is an Oriental fairytale, a dream of instantaneous and boundless travel, but when I visited Venice I saw that illegal immigrants use carpets to fly the coop. They sell counterfeit goods in order to make some money for living. If they are caught by the police they risk expulsion.

There was a butcher in Tunis who wanted to honour Ben Ali. His idea was to call his shop ‘Butcher shop of the 7th November’, the day when Ben Ali assumed the presidency in a ‘medical’ coup d’ état from then President Habib Bourguiba. After he did so, he disappeared without a trace.

In winter 2010, I visited Cairo, a city which has more citizens than the country I was born. This metropolis is characterized by strong contradictions: tradition and modernism, culture and illiteracy, poverty and wealth, bureaucracy and spirituality. All voices fade through the noisy hustle of this melting pot, but if you risk a closer look on the walls you will find the whisper of the people carved into stone.

The three works document  the crossing of borders: traversing the European border leads to problems of being a EU citizen or not; the wide line between insult and homage was transgressed through the unspoken proximity of slaughter and governance of the former Tunesian regime; and the longing for freedom in the police state of Cairo was already written into the walls of the city’

Nadia Kaabi-Linke

Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Butcher bliss, mixed media, 2010

Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Impression of Cairo, mixed media, 2010 (detail)

The Future of a Promise, with works of (ao) Nadia Kaabi-Linke and Emily Jacir

The Pavilion of Egypt

http://www.ahmedbasiony.com/images/pdf/e-flux.pdf

Right: Ahmed Basiony, “30 Days of Running in the Place” documentation footage, February–March2010, Palace of the Arts Gallery, Opera House Grounds, Cairo, Egypt.

Left: Ahmed Basiony, 28th of January (Friday of Rage) 6:50 pm, Tahrir Square. Photo taken by Magdi Mostafa.

Biennale di Arte / 54th International Venice Biennale

Egyptian Pavilion, 2011

30 Days of Running in the Place

Honoring Ahmed Basiony (1978–2011)

Opening reception:

3 June 2011 at 4:15 PM

Runs until 27 November 2011

www.ahmedbasiony.com

Ahmed Basiony (1978–2011) was a crucial component as an artist and professor to the use of new media technology in his artistic and socio-cultural research. He designed projects, each working in its own altering direction out of a diversity of domains in order to expose a personal account experienced through the function of audio and visual material. Motioning through his artistic projects, with an accurate eye of constant visibility, and invisibility, while listening to audio material that further relayed the mappings of social information: Whether in the study of the body, locomotion through a street, the visual impact of a scream versus data representation in the form of indecipherable codes. The artist functioned as a contemporary documentarian; only allowing the archival of data the moment it came in, and no longer there after.

30 Days of Running in the Place is the play of a video documentation to a project that had taken place one year ago. Marking a specific time when the artist had performed a particular demonstration of running, in order to anticipate a countering digital reaction; the aim was to observe how in the act of running in a single standing point, with sensors installed in the soles of his shoes, and on his body [to read levels of body heat], could it had been translated into a visual diagram only to be read in codes, and visually witness the movement of energy and physical consumption become born into an image.

One year later, the uprisings to the Egyptian revolution took on Basiony’s attention, as it had millions of other Egyptians motioning through the exact same states of social consumption. It was from then on, for a period of four days, did Basiony film with his digital and phone camera, the events of downtown Cairo and Tahrir Square, leading to his death on the night of the January 28th, 2011.

An evolution of universal networks created out of audio, visual and electronic communications, blurring the distinction between interpersonal communication, and that of the masses, Basiony’s works only existed in real-time, and then after that they became part of the archives of research he invested into making. It is with this note, we collectively desired, under the auspices of the Ministry of Culture, to recognize and honor the life and death of an artist who was fully dedicated to the notions of an Egypt, that to only recently, demanded the type of change he was seeking his entire life.

A gesture of 30 years young, up against 30 years of a multitude of disquieted unrest.

Curatorial Team

Aida Eltorie, Curator

Shady El Noshokaty, Executive Curator

Magdi Mostafa, Sound & Media Engineering

Hosam Hodhod, Production Assistant

Website: http://www.ahmedbasiony.com

Contact: info@ahmedbasiony.com

http://www.dailymotion.com/embed/video/xkjond Ahmed Basiony: Thirty Days of Running in the… door vernissagetv

My own impression:

Ahmed Basiony, 30 days of running in the space, video installation, Pavilion of Egypt, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ahmed Basiony, 30 days of running in the space, video installation, Pavilion of Egypt, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ahmed Basiony, 30 days of running in the space, video installation, Pavilion of Egypt, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ahmed Basiony, 30 days of running in the space, video installation, Pavilion of Egypt, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ahmed Basiony, 30 days of running in the space, video installation, Pavilion of Egypt, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ahmed Basiony, 30 days of running in the space, video installation, Pavilion of Egypt, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ahmed Basiony, 30 days of running in the space, video installation, Pavilion of Egypt, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Photos by Floris Schreve

The Pavilion of Saudi Arabia

http://www.thisistomorrow.info/viewArticle.aspx?artId=823

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Pavilion, Arsenale, Venice, Italy, 6 Jun 2011

The Black Arch

Title : The Black Arch, installation view Credit : Courtesy Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Pavilion

//


Press Release Abdulaziz Alsebail, Commissioner, is pleased to announce that Shadia and Raja Alem will represent the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for its inaugural pavilion at the 54th International Art Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia, Mona Khazindar1 and Robin Start2 will curate The Black Arch, an installation by the two artists. The work of Shadia and Raja Alem can be read as a double narrative. Raja the writer, and Shadia the visual artist, have a non-traditional artist’s background. While having had a classical and literary education the sisters acquired knowledge through their encounters with pilgrims visiting Makkah. Their family had welcomed pilgrims into their home during the Hajj for generations. Since the mid 1980s, the sisters have travelled the world for exhibitions, lectures, and for the general exploration and appreciation of art and literature, and in some way seeking the origins of cultures and civilizations that sparked their imagination through the stories of the visitors to Makkah throughout their childhood. The Black Arch was created through a profound collaboration between Shadia and Raja Alem. It is very much about a meeting point of the two artists; of two visions of the world; from darkness to light, and of two cities – Makkah and Venice. The work is a stage, set to project the artists’ collective memory of Black – the monumental absence of colour – and physical representation of Black, referring to their past. The narrative is fuelled by the inspirational tales told by their aunts and grandmothers, and is anchored in Makkah, where the sisters grew up in the 1970s. The experience with the physical presence of Black, the first part of the installation, is striking for the artists; Raja explains, “I grew up aware of the physical presence of Black all around, the black silhouettes of Saudi women, the black cloth of the Al ka’ba3 and the black stone4 which is said to have enhanced our knowledge.” As a counter-point, the second part of the installation is a mirror image, reflecting the present. These are the aesthetic parameters of the work. The Black Arch is also about a journey, about transition; inspired by Marco Polo and fellow 13th century traveller Ibn Battuta5 – both examples of how to bridge cultures through travel. Shadia explains how she felt a desire to follow Marco Polo’s example and “to bring my city of Makkah to Venice, through objects brought from there: a Black Arch; a cubic city, and a handful of Muzdalifah pebbles.6” The artists focus on the similarities between the two cosmopolitan cities and their inspirational powers. The double vision of two women, two sisters, two artists unfolds in a world of ritual and tradition which, however, confronts the day-to-day reality of human behaviour with simplicity. “If the doors of perception were cleared, everything would appear to man as it really is, infinite.”  William Blake.

See also the extensive documentation on the website of the Saudi Pavilion: http://saudipavilionvenice.com/

Impression by Floris Schreve:

Raja & Shadia Alem, The Black Arch, installation, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Raja & Shadia Alem, The Black Arch, installation, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Raja & Shadia Alem, The Black Arch, installation, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Raja & Shadia Alem, The Black Arch, installation, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Raja & Shadia Alem, The Black Arch, installation, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Raja & Shadia Alem, The Black Arch, installation, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Raja & Shadia Alem, The Black Arch, installation, Venice Biennial, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

The Pavilion of Iraq; my own impression

Introduction of the curator Mary Angela Shroth:

“These are extraordinary times for Iraq. The project to create an official country Pavilion for the 54. Biennale di Venezia is a multiple and participatory work in progress since 2004. It is historically coming at a period of great renewal after more than 30 years of war and conflict in that country.

The Pavilion of Iraq will feature six internationally-known contemporary Iraqi artists who are emblematic in their individual experimental artistic research, a result of both living inside and outside their country. These artists, studying Fine Arts in Baghdad, completed their arts studies in Europe and USA. They represent two generations: one, born in the early 1950′s, has experienced both the political instability and the cultural richness of that period in Iraq. Ali Assaf, Azad Nanakeli and Walid Siti came of age in the 1970′s during the period of the creation of political socialism that marked their background. The second generation, to include Adel Abidin, Ahmed Alsoudani and Halim Al Karim, grew up during the drama of the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988), the invasion of Kuwait, overwhelming UN economic sanctions and subsequent artistic isolation. This generation of artists exited the country before the 2003 invasion, finding refuge in Europe and USA by sheer fortune coupled with the artistic virtue of their work. All six artists thus have identities indubitably forged with contemporary artistic practice that unites the global situation with the Iraqi experience and they represent a sophisticated and experimental approach that is completely international in scope.

The six artists will execute works on site that are inspired by both the Gervasuti Foundation space and the thematic choice of water. This is a timely interpretation since the lack of water is a primary source of emergency in Iraq, more than civil war and terrorism. A documentary by Oday Rasheed curated by Rijin Sahakian will feature artists living and working in Iraq today.

The Pavilion of Iraq has been produced thanks to Shwan I. Taha and Reem Shather-Kubba/Patrons Committee, corporate and individual contributors, Embassy of the Republic of Iraq and generous grants from the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture, Hussain Ali Al-Hariri, and Nemir & Nada Kirdar. Honorary Patron is the architect Zaha Hadid“.

Azad Nanakeli, Destnuej (purification), Video Installation, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

‘In my language Destnuej means ‘purification’, to cleanse the body from all sins. When I was a boy, water for daily use was extracted from wells for drinking, cooking and washing. Long ago the water from the wells was clear and pure, but already at that time, however, things had changed: my friends who lived in the same area suffered from illness linked to contaminated water. My nephew contracted malaria and died. Since then, much has changed and the wells no longer exist. As in most places they were replaced by aqueducts but the problem persists. Residues of every shape and substance are poured incessantly into the water, poisoning rivers and oceans.

Toxic waste, nuclear by-products, and various chemicals multiply inexorably, seeping into groundwater. Slowly, day after day, they enter into our bodies. For these reasons, the water is no longer pure. Drinking, cooking, washing. Purifying. Purification is an ancient ritual, disseminated in the four corners of the world.

The man who continues to drink this water contaminates his own body. The man who uses it to purify himself contaminates himself.

My work is based on and motivated by these themes, which are also linked to general degradation man causes to the environment around us’.

Azad Nanakeli, March 2011

From: Ali Assaf, Mary Angela Shroth, Acqua Ferita/Wounded Water; Six Iraqi artists interpret the theme of water, Gangemi editore, Venice Biennale, 2011, p. 52

Azad Nanakeli, Au (Water), Mixed Media Installation with audio, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

‘Au’ means water in Kurdish. It is present on our planet in enormous quantities. For the most part, however, it is not available for use: it is salt water that makes up our oceans and glaciers.

The remaining quantity, which we use for the needs of mankind, might be considered sufficient for the moment, but the resources are not unlimited. The need for water increases in an exponential way, with the rise of the world population, and in a few years time the supply might be in jeopardy.

Add to the man’s carelessness and irresponsibility. We waste and pollute water supplies in the name of progress, of consumerism and of economic interests.

It is estimated that within the next twenty years consumption is destined to increase by 40%. What’s more, already today a large part of the world’s population does not have access to clean water sources; among them are the people of the Middle East.

In ancient days and until a few decades ago, these sources existed throughout the territory. They were called oasis. Today after the building of dams by Turkey in the 70’s and by Syria in the 80’s, and the relentless draining of 15,000 square kilometers of Iraqi land (a decision by the regime) everything has changed: where there was once fertile land, there is now desert and desolation.

The World Bank estimates that, by 2035, only 90% of the population of Western Asia, including the Arab Peninsula,  will be without water. The small quantity that will still be available will be directed to urban areas, while the countryside will drown in inescapable aridity.

The accumulation of refuse of large urban and industrial areas over the years had created further danger and damage to the integrity of its precious resource.

Underground water levels are polluted by toxic substances. Non-biodegradable materials from refuse dumps accumulate in canals and oceans.

This work emulates the disturbing images from the media of islands composed entirely of accumulated waste.

Azad Nanakeli, March, 2011

Acqua Ferita, p. 56

Halim Al Karim, Nations Laundry, video installation, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Nations Laundry

In this video (Nations Laundry), the idea and materials used to reflect the concepts of threat, apprehension, and survival in matters of our environment. Within this work, my aim is to create an awareness that may, in turn, help bring about positive changes to our failing environmental systems that came as a result of yours and our wars.

Halim Al-Karim, March 2011

Acqua Ferita, p. 58

Halim Al Karim, Hidden Love 3, fotograph lambda-print, 2010 (photo Floris Schreve)

Halim al Karim (overview- source http://www.modernism.ro/2011/08/29/six-iraqi-artists-acqua-ferita-wounded-water-iraq-pavilion-the-54th-international-art-exhibition-of-the-venice-biennale/)

My works dwell on the envolving mentality of urban society. I am concerned with ongoing and unresolved issues, particularly when they relate to violence. I search both through the layers of collective memory and my personal experience in that context.

In this process, the main challenge for me is to identify and stay clear of the historical and contemporary elements of brainwash.

Through these works I try to visualize an urban society free of violence. These out of focus images, sometimes rendered more mysterious under a veil of silk, imply uncertainty of context, time and place. These techniques, which have become the hallmark of my work, are a means to overcome the effects of politics of deception and, in turn, transform me and the camera into single truth seeking entity.

Halim Al-Karim, March 2011

Acqua Ferita, p. 58

Ahmed Alsoudani (overview- source http://www.modernism.ro/2011/08/29/six-iraqi-artists-acqua-ferita-wounded-water-iraq-pavilion-the-54th-international-art-exhibition-of-the-venice-biennale/)

‘My deepest memories are central to my painting but it is often easier only to look at the surface; to see war, torture and violence and even to consider my art only in terms of the present Iraq war. My own approach is different from anything related to the first impression. I am interested in memory and history, and in the potent areas between the two that enable me to keep memories alive in the present. As an artist, it is important not to get obsessed with my subject matter. I need critical distance. Some of the events that inform my paintings are things I have personally experienced while others I have heard about from family or close friends. These events are refashioned  in my imagination in such a way that I am able to look at them both very personally and with some distance. If I were too personal and too literal about these subjects I would be overly emotional and that would negatively affect the work, I would take it into a place which is something other than art. In order for these works to survive as art I need the distance my interior process of distilling my subject matter affords me. In terms of Iraq, I care deeply about the country and the people there. My work is not intended to be a first person account on war, atrocity or the effect of totalitarianism in Iraq in the last twenty years; in fact I think there are universal and common aspects to these things throughout history and different parts of the world and I hope viewers will see this in my paintings in Venice’.

Ahmed Alsoudani, New York, april, 2011 (from Ali Assaf, Mary Angela Shroth, Acqua Ferita/Wounded Water; Six Iraqi artists interpret the theme of water, Gangemi editore, Venice Biennale, 2011)

Walid Siti, Beauty-spot, installation, 2011 (http://fnewsmagazine.com/2011/07/biennale-binge-part-2/ )

Beauty Spot

The Gali Ali Breg (Gorge of Ali Beg) waterfall is part of Hamilton Road, built in 1932 under the guidance of New Zealand engineer Sir Archibald Milne Hamilton to link Erbil with the Iranian border. The waterfall had long been a tourist destination, featured in Iraqi publications and on the current  5000 Iraqi Dinar note.

Two years ago a drought afflicted the region, and left the waterfall dry in the summer seasons. This prompted the Kurdish government to hire a Lebanese company to divert water to the falls, which involved pumping 250 cubic meters of water per second. The imagery on the note thus remained intact.

Walid Siti, 2011

Acqua Ferita, p. 64

Walid Siti, Mes0 (detail), Mylar mirror, twill tape, nylon fishing line and wood, 2011 (source: http://www.modernism.ro/2011/08/29/six-iraqi-artists-acqua-ferita-wounded-water-iraq-pavilion-the-54th-international-art-exhibition-of-the-venice-biennale/)

Walid Siti,   Meso (detail), Mylar mirror, twill tape, nylon fishing line and wood, 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Meso 2011

From the air, the Great Zab River near Erbil forms a snaking, green body of water in a dry, golden landscape. Though beautiful, the sight also reveals the skeletons of dried out rivers and streams that once contributed to its flow. This piece exposes the fragility of the Great Zab (one of the main tributaries to the Tigris River), now exposed to the lurking threats of drought, rapid development and political tugs-of-war.

Walid Siti, 2011

Acqua Ferita, p. 64

Adel Abidin, Consumptions of War, Video Projection and amorphic installation (photo Floris Schreve- see here a compilation)

Adel Abidin, Consumptions of War, Video Projection and amorphic installation (photo Floris Schreve- see here a compilation)

Adel Abidin, Consumptions of War, Video Projection and amorphic installation (photo Floris Schreve- see here a compilation)

Adel Abidin, Consumptions of War, Video Projection and amorphic installation (photo Floris Schreve- see here a compilation)

Adel Abidin, Consumptions of War, Video Projection and amorphic installation (photo Floris Schreve- see here a compilation)

Consumption of War explores the environmental crisis through the participatory crisis and spectator culture of profit driven bodies. Today, global corporate entities encourage consumption on a massive scale for maximum profit, disregarding the obscene amounts of water needed to produce ‘necessities’ such as a pair of jeans or cup of coffee. In Iraq, major corporations have signed the largest free oil exploration deals in history. Yet while every barrel of oil extracted requires 1.5 barrels of water, 1 out of every 4 citizens has no access to clean drinking water.

In a corporate office, two men compete in a childish battle inspired by Star Wars, using fluorescent lights as swords. Each light is consumed until the darkened room marks the game’s abrupt end. Alternating between lush and dry, attractive and foolish, this is a landscape of false promises and restricted power’

Adel Abidin, March 2011, Acqua Ferita, p. 34

Narciso – Alì Assaf from EcoArt Project on Vimeo.

Ali Assaf, still from Narciso (photo Floris Schreve)

For the 2011 Biennale I have conceived two works. Between them, they approach several aspects following my recent visit to my hometown, Al Basrah, where I lived till the age of 18 and where the majority of my gamily still resides.

Narciso

In my parents’ house in Al Basrah, I found myself turning the pages of an old schoolbook on Caravaggio (1571-1610). Before an illustration of his ‘Narciso’, these questions came to mind:

‘What would happen today if Narcissus saw himself in the water?’

‘Would he be able to see his image in today’s polluted water?’

‘And myself? If I was able to see my image in the waters of Al Basrah, what would I see?’

In this manner my return to Al Basrah had the meaning of reflecting myself in my own history and in its own in-depth and intimate personal identity. But it was impossible to do, because I found this identity led astray and darkened.

Ali Assaf, al-Basrah, the Venice of the East (installation), 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ali Assaf, al-Basrah, the Venice of the East (installation), 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ali Assaf, al-Basrah, the Venice of the East (installation), 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ali Assaf, al-Basrah, the Venice of the East (installation), 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Ali Assaf,  al-Basrah, the Venice of the East (detail), 2011 (photo Floris Schreve)

Al Basrah, the Venice of the East

My arrival at the border between Kuwait and Iraq was a shock.

A profound sense of frustration when confronted with this reality.

‘ There was nothing left from those memories that were so important to my survival. Only destruction and ugliness. The surviving friends and family had aged, the Shatt al-Arab River had become saline.

The canals had dried up and were a deposit for refuse and garbage, the historic buildings destroyed or substituted by illegal constructions, the dates were contaminated.

The Shenashil built of wood (with their Indo-English balconies) were abandoned to their own devices, to the sun and rain, they had lost their charm and characteristic beauty. These places were corroded by humidity and lack of care, marked by war and the embargo.

All without a trace of poetry.

Ali Assaf, 2011

Acqua Ferita, p. 46

Me in the Black Arch

Floris Schreve

فلوريس سحرافا

(أمستردام، هولندا)

H575BBQT5U46

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld in Nederland (verschenen in Eutopia nr. 27, april 2011 ‘Diversiteit in de Beeldende Kunst’) – فنانون من العالم العربي في هولندا

Mijn artikel, dat afgelopen voorjaar in Eutopia is verschenen (Eutopia nr. 27, april 2011, themanummer ‘Diversiteit in de Beeldende Kunst’, zie hier). Het artikel heb ik echter geschreven in het najaar van 2010, dus nog vóór de opstanden in de Arabische wereld. Hoewel het onderwerp natuurlijk kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld in Nederland was, zou ik er zeker een opmerking over hebben gemaakt. De Arabische Lente, die in Tunesië begon nadat op 17 december 2010 in Sidi Bouzid de 27 jarige Mohamed Bouazizi zichzelf in brand stak en daarmee de onvrede van de relatief jonge Arabische bevolking met de zittende dictatoriale regimes van de diverse landen een gezicht gaf, is, los van hoe de ontwikkelingen verder zullen gaan, natuurlijk een historische mijlpaal zonder weerga. Maar het begin van de Arabische opstanden voltrok zich precies tussen het moment dat ik onderstaande bijdrage had ingestuurd (november 2010) en de uiteindelijke verschijning in mei 2011.   In een later geschreven bijdrage voor Kunstbeeld, over moderne en hedendaagse kunst in de Arabische wereld zelf, heb ik wel aandacht aan deze ontwikkelingen besteed, zie hier.

Het nummer van Eutopia was vrijwel geheel gewijd aan kunstenaars uit Iran in Nederland. In de verschillende bijdragen van Özkan Gölpinar, Neil van der Linden, Robert Kluijver, Dineke Huizenga, Bart Top, Marja Vuijsje, Wanda Zoet en anderen kwamen vooral Iraanse kunstenaars aan bod, als Soheila Najand, Atousa Bandeh Ghiasabadi, Farhad Foroutanian, (de affaire) Sooreh Hera en nog een aantal anderen. In mijn bijdrage heb ik me gericht op de kunstenaars uit de Arabische landen, die wonen en werken in Nederland, die ook een belangrijke rol speelden in mijn scriptie-onderzoek.

De tekst is vrijwel dezelfde als die van de gedrukte versie, alleen heb ik een flink aantal weblinks toegevoegd, die verwijzen naar websites van individuele kunstenaars, achtergrondartikelen en documentaires, of radio- en televisie-uitzendingen.

Hieronder mijn bijdrage aan dit themanummer:

Kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld in Nederland 

فنانون من العالم العربي في هولندا

Naast dat er een aantal uit Iran afkomstige kunstenaars in ons land actief zijn, zijn er ook veel kunstenaars uit de Arabische landen, die wonen en werken in Nederland. Je zou deze groep migrantkunstenaars in drie categorieën kunnen verdelen.

Allereerst zijn er zo’n twintig kunstenaars die vanaf de jaren zeventig naar Europa en uiteindelijk naar Nederland kwamen om hun opleiding te voltooien en hier gebleven zijn. Te denken valt aan Nour-Eddine Jarram  en Bouchaib Dihaj (Marokko),  Abousleiman (Libanon), Baldin (Iraaks Koerdistan), Saad Ali  (Irak, inmiddels verhuisd naar Frankrijk), Essam Marouf , Shawky Ezzat, Achnaton Nassar (Egypte) en van een iets latere lichting Abdulhamid Lahzami en Chokri Ben Amor (Tunesië) .  [1]

Achnaton Nassar, bijvoorbeeld, kwam naar Nederland om verder te studeren aan de Rijksacademie. Hij werd in 1952 in Qena, Egypte, geboren en studeerde aan de universiteiten van Alexandrië en Cairo. Hier werd hij opgeleid in de islamitische traditie, waarbij het Arabische alfabet als uitgangspunt diende. Nassar vond dit te beperkt. De drang om zich verder te ontwikkelen dreef hem naar Europa. Na een studie architectuur in het Griekse Saloniki deed Nassar zijn toelatingsexamen voor de Rijksacademie, te Amsterdam. Daarna vestigde hij zich in 1982 in Amstelveen.

Het grootste deel van Nassars werk bestaat uit abstracte tekeningen, waarbij hij verschillende technieken inzet. In zijn composities verwijst Nassar vaak naar de abstracte vormtaal van de islamitische kunst en het Arabische schrift, al verwerkt hij deze met de organische vormen die hij hier in bijvoorbeeld het Amsterdamse bos aantreft, dat vlakbij zijn atelier ligt.  [2]

In de jaren negentig heeft Nassar een serie popart-achtige figuratieve werken gemaakt, die een dwarse kijk geven op het toen net oplaaiende debat over ‘de multiculturele samenleving’. In deze serie werken combineert Nassar clichébeelden van wat de Nederlandse identiteit zou zijn, met clichébeelden die hier bestaan van de Arabische cultuur. Door op een ironische manier beide stereoptype beelden te combineren, worden beiden gerelativeerd of ontzenuwd.

Een voorbeeld is het hier getoonde paneel uit de periode 1995-2000. Het werk verwijst naar het bankbiljet voor duizend gulden, waarop het portret van Spinoza staat weergegeven. Door kleine interventies is het beeld van betekenis veranderd. Het gebruikelijke 1000 gulden is vervangen met 1001 Nacht en ‘De Nederlandsche Bank’ is veranderd in ‘De Wereldliteratuurbank’. Het biljet is getekend door president N. Mahfouz op 22 juli 1952, de dag van de Egyptische revolutie en bovendien Nassars geboortedag. Een opmerkelijk detail zijn de met goudverf aangebrachte lijnen in het gezicht van Spinoza. Deze lijnen, die lopen vanaf het profiel van de neus via de rechter wenkbrauw naar het rechteroog, vormen het woord Baruch in het Arabisch, Spinoza’s voornaam. Op deze wijze plaatst Nassar een Nederlands symbool als het duizend gulden biljet in een nieuwe context. Spinoza was immers in zijn tijd ook een vreemdeling, namelijk een nazaat van Portugese Joden. Met een werk als dit stelt Nassar belangrijke vragen over nationale versus hybride identiteit en maakt hij een statement over de betrekkelijkheid van symboliek als een statisch referentiepunt van nationale identificatie. [3]

Ook de andere figuratieve werken van Nassar staan vol met dit soort verwijzingen. De essentie van zijn werk ligt in hoe de een naar de ander kijkt en de ander weer naar de één. De ‘oosterling’ kijkt naar de ‘westerling’ volgens een bepaald mechanisme, maar Nassar heeft vooral dit thema in omgekeerde richting verwerkt: wat is de cultureel bepaalde blik van het ‘Westen’ naar de ‘Oriënt’?

Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel, acryl op paneel, 1995-1996 (afb. collectie van de kunstenaar)

Met zijn beeldinterventies legt Nassar valse neo-koloniale en exotistische structuren bloot, die in het westerse culturele denken bestaan. Hiermee raakt hij een belangrijk punt van de westerse cultuurgeschiedenis. Volgens de Palestijnse literatuurwetenschapper Edward Said bestaat er een groot complex aan cultureel bepaalde vooroordelen in de westerse culturele canon wat betreft de ‘Oriënt’. In zijn belangrijkste werk, Orientalism  (1978), heeft hij erop gewezen dat de beeldvorming van het westen van de Arabische wereld vooral wordt bepaald door enerzijds een romantisch exotisme en anderzijds door een reactionaire kracht die, in de wil tot overheersing, de ‘irrationaliteit’ van de ‘Oriënt’ wil indammen, daar zij nooit zelf in staat zou zijn om tot vernieuwingen te komen. Said heeft in zijn belangrijke wetenschappelijke oeuvre (Orientalism en latere werken) de onderliggende denkstructuren blootgelegd, die hij toeschrijft aan het imperialistische gedachtegoed, een restant dat is gebleven na de koloniale periode en nog steeds zijn weerslag vindt in bijvoorbeeld de wetenschap (zie Bernard Lewis, maar van iets later bijvoorbeeld ook de notie van de ‘Clash of Civilizations’ van Samuel Huntington, die sterk op het gedachtegoed van Lewis is geïnspireerd- het begrip ‘Clash of Civilizations’ is zelfs ontleend aan een passage uit Lewis’ artikel The Roots of the Muslim Rage uit 1990), de media en de politiek. [4] Ook voor het debat in de hedendaagse kunst is Saids bijdrage van groot belang geweest. Op dit moment speelt het discours zich af tussen processen van uitsluiting, het toetreden van de ander (maar daarbij het insluipende gevaar van exotisme), of gewoon dat goede kunst van ieder werelddeel afkomstig kan zijn.

De overgrote meerderheid van de kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld in Nederland bestaat vooral uit kunstenaars uit Irak, die grotendeels in de jaren negentig naar Nederland zijn gekomen als politiek vluchteling voor het vroegere Iraakse regime. Het gaat hier om zo’n tachtig beeldende kunstenaars, zowel van Arabische als Koerdische afkomst. Naast beeldende kunstenaars zijn er overigens ook veel dichters (bijv. Salah Hassan, Naji Rahim, Chaalan Charif  en al-Galidi ), schrijvers (Mowaffk al-Sawad  en Ibrahim Selman), musici (zoals het beroemde Iraqi Maqam ensemble van Farida Mohammed Ali, de fluitist / slagwerker Sattar Alsaadi, de zanger Saleh Bustan en het Koerdische gezelschap Belan, van oa Nariman Goran) en acteurs (bijv. Saleh Hassan Faris) in die tijd naar Nederland gekomen. [5]

Beeldende kunstenaars uit Irak die zich de afgelopen jaren in Nederland hebben gemanifesteerd zijn oa Ziad Haider (helaas overleden in 2006, zie ook dit artikel op dit blog), Aras Kareem (zie ook hier op dit blog), Monkith Saaid  (helaas overleden in 2008), Ali Talib , Afifa Aleiby, Nedim Kufi (zie op dit blog hier en hier), Halim al Karim (verhuisd naar de VS, overigens nu op de Biënnale van Venetië, zie dit artikel), Salman al-Basri, Mohammed Qureish, Hoshyar Rasheed (zie ook op dit blog), Sadik Kwaish Alfraji, Sattar Kawoosh , Iman Ali , Hesam Kakay, Fathel Neema, Salam Djaaz, Araz Talib, Hareth Muthanna, Awni Sami, Fatima Barznge en vele anderen. [6]

Een Iraakse kunstenaar, die sinds de laatste jaren steeds meer boven de horizon van ook de Nederlandse gevestigde kunstinstellingen is gekomen, is Qassim Alsaedy (Bagdad 1949). Alsaedy studeerde in de jaren zeventig aan de kunstacademie in Bagdad, waar hij een leerling was van oa Shakir Hassan al-Said, een van de meest toonaangevende kunstenaars van Irak en wellicht een van de meest invloedrijke kunstenaars van de Arabische en zelfs islamitische wereld van de twintigste eeuw. [7] Gedurende zijn studententijd kwam Alsaedy al in conflict met het regime van de Ba’thpartij. Hij werd gearresteerd en zat negen maanden gevangen in al-Qasr an-Nihayyah, het beruchte ‘Paleis van het Einde’, de voorloper van de latere Abu Ghraib gevangenis.

Na die tijd was het voor Alasedy erg moeilijk om zich ergens langdurig als kunstenaar te vestigen. Hij woonde afwisselend in Syrië, Jemen en in de jaren tachtig in Iraaks Koerdistan, waar hij leefde met de Peshmerga’s (de Koerdische rebellen). Toen het regime in Bagdad de operatie ‘Anfal’ lanceerde, de beruchte genocide campagne op de Koerden, week Alsaedy uit naar Libië, waar hij zeven jaar lang als kunstenaar actief was. Uiteindelijk kwam hij midden jaren negentig naar Nederland.

 

 

Afbeelding78

Qassim Alsaedy, object uit de serie/installatie Faces of Baghdad, assemblage van metaal en lege patroonhulzen op paneel, 2005 (geëxposeerd op de Biënnale van Florence van 2005). Afb. collectie van de kunstenaar

In het werk van Alsaedy staan de afdrukken die de mens in de loop van geschiedenis hebben achterlaten centraal. Hij is vooral gefascineerd door oude muren, waarop de sporen van de geschiedenis zichtbaar zijn. In zijn vaderland Irak, het gebied van het vroegere Mesopotamië, werden al sinds duizenden jaren bouwwerken opgetrokken, die in de loop van de geschiedenis weer vergingen. Telkens weer liet de mens zijn sporen na. In Alsaedy’s visie blijft er op een plaats altijd iets van de geschiedenis achter. In een bepaald opzicht vertoont het werk van Qassim Alsaedy enige overeenkomsten met het werk van de bekende Nederlandse kunstenaar Armando . Toch zijn er ook verschillen; waar Armando in zijn ‘schuldige landschappen’ tracht uit te drukken dat de geschiedenis een blijvend stempel op een bepaalde plaats drukt (zie zijn werken nav de Tweede Wereldoorlog en de concentratiekampen van de Nazi’s), laat Alsaedy de toeschouwer zien dat de tijd uiteindelijk de wonden van de geschiedenis heelt. [8]

Het hier getoonde werk gaat meer over de recente geschiedenis van zijn land. Alsaedy maakte deze assemblage van lege patroonhulzen na zijn bezoek aan Bagdad in de zomer van 2003, toen hij na meer dan vijfentwintig jaar voor het eerst weer zijn geboorteland bezocht. Vanzelfsprekend is dit werk een reactie op de oorlog die dat jaar begonnen was. Maar ook deze ‘oorlogsresten’ zullen uiteindelijk wegroesten en verdwijnen, waarna er slechts een paar gaten of littekens achterblijven.

Sinds de laatste tien jaar begint ook de tweede generatie migrantenkunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld zichtbaar te worden. De tot nu toe meest bekende kunstenaar uit deze categorie is de Nederlandse/ Marokkaanse kunstenaar Rachid Ben Ali. Ben Ali bezocht kortstondig de mode-academie en de kunstacademie in Arnhem, maar vestigde zich al snel als autonoom kunstenaar in Amsterdam. Sinds die tijd heeft hij een stormachtige carrière doorgemaakt. Hij werd ‘ontdekt’ door Rudi Fuchs, exposeerde in het Stedelijk op de tentoonstelling die was samengesteld door Koningin Beatrix en had een paar grote solo-exposities, waaronder in Het Domein in Sittard (2002) en in het Cobramuseum in Amstelveen (2005). Deze tentoonstellingen verliepen overigens niet zonder controverses. Vanuit de islamitische hoek, maar zeker ook vanuit de autochtone Nederlandse hoek (zoals in de gemeente van Sittard, toen Ben Ali in het Domein exposeerde in 2002), werd het werk van Ben Ali als provocerend of aanstootgevend ervaren, vooral vanwege de expliciet homo-erotische voorstellingen die hij had verbeeld. [9]

Het werk van Ben Ali is rauw, direct, intuïtief en soms confronterend. In zijn werk zijn persoonlijke en politieke thema’s met elkaar verweven. Een belangrijke rol spelen zijn persoonlijke achtergrond, zijn homoseksualiteit, zijn verontwaardiging over zowel racisme en vreemdelingenhaat, als over religieuze bekrompenheid en intolerantie en zijn betrokkenheid bij wat er in de wereld gebeurt. Het hier getoonde werk maakte Ben Ali naar aanleiding van beelden van doodgeschoten Palestijnse kinderen door het Israëlische leger. Het weergegeven silhouet is een verbeelding van zijn eigen schaduw. Ben Ali heeft zichzelf hier weergeven als een machteloze toeschouwer, die van een grote afstand niet in staat is om iets te doen, behalve te aanschouwen en te getuigen. [10]

Er zijn nog veel meer kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld in Nederland actief, zowel uit het Midden Oosten als Noord Afrika. Het is vanzelfsprekend onmogelijk om hen allemaal in dit verband recht te doen. Hoewel de meesten nog onbekend zijn bij de gevestigde instellingen, neemt hun zichtbaarheid in de Nederlandse kunstwereld langzaam maar zeker toe.

Floris Schreve,

Amsterdam, november 2010

فلوريس سحرافا

امستردام، 2010

Zie in dit verband ook mijn recente uitgebreide tekst over Qassim Alsaedy, nav de tentoonstelling in Diversity & Art en de bijdragen rond mijn lezing (de handout, mijn bijdrage in Kunstbeeld en de Engelse versie, waarin ik beiden heb samengevoegd) over de hedendaagse kunst in de Arabische wereld, waarin de actuele gebeurtenissen wel uitgebreid aan de orde zijn gekomen

 

 

Rachid h2 5

Rachid Ben Ali, Zonder Titel, acryl op doek, 2001 (foto Floris Schreve)

Noten

 [1] Tineke Lonte, Kleine Beelden, Grote Dromen, Al Farabi, Beurs van Berlage, Amsterdam, 1993 (zie ook Jihad Abou Sleiman, Arabische kunstenaars schilderen bergen in Nederland, in Rosemarie Buikema, Maaike Meijer, ‘Cultuur en Migratie in Nederland; Kunst in Beweging 1980-2000’, Sdu Uitgevers, Den Haag, 2004, pp. 237-252, http://www.dbnl.org/tekst/meij017cult02_01/meij017cult02_01_0015.php) ; Mili Milosevic, Schakels, Museum voor Volkenkunde (Wereldmuseum), Rotterdam,  1988; Jetteke Bolten, Els van der Plas, Het Klimaat: Buitenlandse Beeldende Kunstenaars in Nederland, Gate Foundation, Stedelijk Museum de Lakenhal, Culturele Raad Zuid Holland, Den Haag, 1991; Paul Faber, Sebastian López, Double Dutch; transculturele beïnvloeding in de beeldende kunst, Stichting Kunst Mondiaal, Tilburg, 1992 (zie hier de introductie);  Els van der Plas, Anil Ramdas, Sebastian López, Het land dat in mij woont: literatuur en beeldende kunst over migratie, Gate Foundation, Museum voor Volkenkunde (Wereldmuseum), Rotterdam, 1995.

[2] Hans Sizoo, ‘Nassar, het park en de Moskee’, in J. Rutten (red.) met bijdragen van Kitty Zijlmans, Floris Schreve, Hans Sizoo, Achnaton Nassar, Saskia en Hassan gaan trouwen, werken van Achnaton Nassar, Universiteitsbibliotheek Leiden, 2001. Zie ook http://www.dripbook.com/achnatonnassar/splash/ en voor meer abstract werk (tekeningen), zie de site van Galerie Art Singel 100, http://www.artxs.nl/achnaton.htm

[3] Saskia en Hassan (2001), zie ook de online versie http://bc.ub.leidenuniv.nl/bc/tentoonstelling/Saskia_en_hassan/

[4] Edward Said, Orientalism; Western conceptions of the Orient, Pantheon Books, New York, 1978 (repr. Penguin Books, New York 1995, 2003). Zie ook: Samuel Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations?, Foreign Affairs, vol. 72, no. 3, Summer 1993; Bernard Lewis, The Roots of the Muslim Rage, The Atlantic Monthly, September 1990, http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1990/09/the-roots-of-muslim-rage/4643/ , Edward Said, The Clash of Ignorance, The Nation, 4 October, 2001, http://www.thenation.com/article/clash-ignorance

[5] Zie bijv. Chaalan Charif, Dineke Huizenga, Mowaffk al-Sawad (red.), Dwaallicht; tien Iraakse dichters in Nederland (poëzie van Mohammad Amin, Chaalan Charif, Venus Faiq, Hameed Haddad, Balkis Hamid Hassan, Salah Hassan, Karim Nasser, Naji Rahim, Mowaffk al-Sawad en Ali Shaye), de Passage, Groningen, 2006; Mowaffk al-Sawad, Stemmen onder de zon, uitgeverij de Passage, Groningen (roman, gebundelde brieven), 2002; Ibrahim Selman, En de zee spleet in tweeën, in de Knipscheer, Amsterdam, 2002 (roman) en de website van Al Galidi http://www.algalidi.com/. Over Iraakse schrijvers in Nederland Dineke Huizenga, Parels van getuigenissen, Zemzem; Tijdschrift over het Midden Oosten, Noord Afrika en islam, themanummer ‘Nederland en Irak’, jaargang 2, nr. 2/ 2006, pp. 56-63 en over Iraakse musici in Nederland Neil van der Linden, Muzikant in Holland, idem, pp. 82-87

[6] Zie oa W. P. C. van der Ende, Versluierde Taal, vijf uit Irak afkomstige kunstenaars in Nederland, Museum Rijswijk, Vluchtelingenwerk Rijswijk, 1999; IMPRESSIES; Kunstenaars uit Irak in ballingschap, AIDA Nederland, Amsterdam, 1996; Ismael Zayer, 28 kunstenaars uit Irak in Nederland, de Babil Liga voor de letteren en de kunsten, Gemeentehuis Den Haag, 2000; Anneke van Ammelrooy, Karim al-Najar, Iraakse kunstenaars in het Museon, Babil, Den Haag, november, 2002; Floris Schreve, Out of Mesopotamia; Iraakse kunstenaars in ballingschap, Leidschrift, Vakgroep Geschiedenis Universiteit Leiden, 17-3-2002 (bewerkte versie Iraakse kunst in de Diaspora, verschenen in Eutopia, nr. 4, april 2003, pp. 45-63); Floris Schreve, Kunst gedijt ook in ballingschap, Zemzem; Tijdschrift over het Midden Oosten, Noord Afrika en islam, themanummer ‘Nederland en Irak’, jaargang 2, nr. 2/ 2006, pp. 73-80 (online versie: https://fhs1973.wordpress.com/2009/06/16/ ); Helge Daniels, Corien Hoek, Charlotte Huygens, Focus Irak, programma en catalogus van het Iraakse culturele festival/tentoonstelling in het Wereldmuseum, ism de Stchting Akkaad, Rotterdam, mei 2004 (zie http://www.akaad.nl/archief.php);  programma ‘Iraakse kunsten in Amsterdam’ (2004), zie http://aidanederland.nl/wordpress/archief/discipline/multidisciplinair/seizoen-2004-2005/iraakse-kunsten-in-amsterdam/. Zie ook Beeldenstorm; vijf Iraakse kunstenaars in Nederland over hun ervaringen in Irak, ‘Factor’, IKON, Nederland 1, 17 juli, 2003, http://www.ikonrtv.nl/factor/index.asp?oId=924#. Zie over Iraakse kunstenaars uit de Diaspora van verschillende landen (uit Nederland Nedim Kufi) Robert Kluijver, Nat Muller, Borders; contemporary Middle Eastern Art and Discourse, Gemak/ De Vrije Academie, Den Haag, oktober 2007/januari 2009.

[7] Nada Shabout, Shakir Hassan Al Said; A Journey towards the One-dimension, Universe in Universe, Ifa (Duitsland), april, 2008, http://universes-in-universe.org/eng/nafas/articles/2008/shakir_hassan_al_said . Zie ook Saeb Eigner, Art of the Middle East; modern and contemporary art of the Arab World and Iran, Merrell, Londen/New York, 2010; Maysaloun Faraj (ed.), Strokes of genius; contemporary Iraqi art, Saqi Books, Londen, 2002; Mohamed Metalsi, Croisement de Signe, Institut du Monde Arabe, Parijs, 1989. Zie ook hier, op de site van de Darat al-Funun in Amman (Jordanië), een van de meest toonaangevende musea voor moderne en hedendaagse kunst in de Arabische wereld.

[8] Zie mijn interview met Qassim Alsaedy, augustus 2000, gepubliceerd op https://fhs1973.wordpress.com/2008/07/14/. Een interview met Alsaedy in het Arabisch (in al-Hurra) is hier te raadplegen. Zie voor meer werk Qassim Alsaedy’s website, http://www.qassim-alsaedy.com/ of de website van de galerie van Frank Welkenhuysen (Utrecht) http://www.kunstexpert.com/kunstenaar.aspx?id=4481

[9] Patrick Healy, Henk Kraan, Rachid Ben Ali, Amsterdam, 2000; Rudi Fuchs, Het Stedelijk Paleis, de keuze van de Koningin, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, 2000; Bloothed, Het Domein Sittard, 2003, Rachid Ben Ali, Cobra Museum, Amstelveen, 2005. Zie verder discussie op Maroc.nl (http://www.maroc.nl/forums/archive/index.php/t-43300.html), Premtime (http://www.volkskrant.nl/vk/nl/2844/Archief/archief/article/detail/658197/2005/01/25/PREMtime.dhtml), of bij de Nederlandse Moslimomroep (http://www.nmo.nl/67-kunst__offerfeest_en_nationale_verzoening.html?aflevering=2413).

[10] Dominique Caubet, Margriet Kruyver, Rachid Ben Ali, Thieme Art, 2008. Zie voor recent werk de website van Witzenhausen Gallery, http://www.witzenhausengallery.nl/artist.php?mgrp=0&idxArtist=185

   

invisible hit counter

Tien jaar na 9/11

Nu het tien jaar is na 9/11 wil ik op deze plaats ook stilstaan bij de aanslagen in Amerika, die grote gevolgen hadden voor de gebeurtenissen in het afgelopen decennium. Ik wil dat doen door hier een aantal documentaires aan te prijzen, waarvan ik zelf geloof dat die belangrijk/ interessant/veelzeggend zijn.

Allereerst natuurlijk het superieure Channel 4 drieluik The Power of Nightmares:

The Power of Nightmares, subtitled The Rise of the Politics of Fear, is a 3 part BBC documentary film series, written and produced by Adam Curtis.
The films compare the rise of the Neo-Conservative movement in the United States and the radical Islamist movement, making comparisons on their origins and claiming similarities between the two. More controversially, it argues that the threat of radical Islamism as a massive, sinister organized force of destruction, specifically in the form of al-Qaeda, is a myth perpetrated by politicians in many countries—and particularly American Neo-Conservatives—in an attempt to unite and inspire their people following the failure of earlier, more utopian ideologies.

Part 1: Baby It’s Cold Outside:

Zie voor een versie met Nederlandse ondertiteling:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1209880818148218142

The first part of the series explains the origin of Islamism and Neo-Conservatism. It shows Egyptian civil servant Sayyid Qutb, depicted as the founder of modern Islamist thought, visiting the U.S. to learn about the education system, but becoming disgusted with what he saw as a corruption of morals and virtues in western society through individualism. When he returns to Egypt, he is disturbed by westernization under Gamal Abdel Nasser and becomes convinced that in order to save society it must be completely restructured along the lines of Islamic law while still using western technology. He also becomes convinced that this can only be accomplished through the use of an elite “vanguard” to lead a revolution against the established order. Qutb becomes a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood and, after being tortured in one of Nasser’s jails, comes to believe that western-influenced leaders can justly be killed for the sake of removing their corruption. Qutb is executed in 1966, but he influences the future mentor of Osama bin Laden, Ayman al-Zawahiri, to start his own secret Islamist group. Inspired by the 1979 Iranian revolution, Zawahiri and his allies assassinate Egyptian president Anwar Al Sadat, in 1981, in hopes of starting their own revolution. The revolution does not materialize, and Zawahiri comes to believe that the majority of Muslims have been corrupted not only by their western-inspired leaders, but Muslims themselves have been affected by jahilliyah and thus both may be legitimate targets of violence if they do not join him. They continued to have the belief that a vanguard was necessary to rise up and overthrow the corrupt regime and replace with a pure Islamist state.

At the same time in the United States, a group of disillusioned liberals, including Irving Kristol and Paul Wolfowitz, look to the political thinking of Leo Strauss after the perceived failure of President Johnson’s “Great Society”. They come to the conclusion that the emphasis on individual liberty was the undoing of the plan. They envisioned restructuring America by uniting the American people against a common evil, and set about creating a mythical enemy. These factions, the Neo-Conservatives, came to power under the Reagan administration, with their allies Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld, and work to unite the United States in fear of the Soviet Union. The Neo-Conservatives allege the Soviet Union is not following the terms of disarmament between the two countries, and, with the investigation of “Team B”, they accumulate a case to prove this with dubious evidence and methods. President Reagan is convinced nonetheless.

Part 2: The Phantom Victory:

Zie voor een versie met Nederlandse ondertiteling: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7307000565144006714

In the second episode, Islamist factions, rapidly falling under the more radical influence of Zawahiri and his rich Saudi acolyte Osama bin Laden, join the Neo-Conservative-influenced Reagan Administration to combat the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. When the Soviets eventually pull out and when the Eastern Bloc begins to collapse in the late 1980s, both groups believe they are the primary architects of the “Evil Empire’s” defeat. Curtis argues that the Soviets were on their last legs anyway, and were doomed to collapse without intervention.

However, the Islamists see it quite differently, and in their triumph believe that they had the power to create ‘pure’ Islamic states in Egypt and Algeria. However, attempts to create perpetual Islamic states are blocked by force. The Islamists then try to create revolutions in Egypt and Algeria by the use of terrorism to scare the people into rising up. However, the people were terrified by the violence and the Algerian government uses their fear as a way to maintain power. In the end, the Islamists declare the entire populations of the countries as inherently contaminated by western values, and finally in Algeria turn on each other, each believing that other terrorist groups are not pure enough Muslims either.

In America, the Neo-Conservatives’ aspirations to use the United States military power for further destruction of evil are thrown off track by the ascent of George H. W. Bush to the presidency, followed by the 1992 election of Bill Clinton leaving them out of power. The Neo-Conservatives, with their conservative Christian allies, attempt to demonize Clinton throughout his presidency with various real and fabricated stories of corruption and immorality. To their disappointment, however, the American people do not turn against Clinton. The Islamist attempts at revolution end in massive bloodshed, leaving the Islamists without popular support. Zawahiri and bin Laden flee to the sufficiently safe Afghanistan and declare a new strategy; to fight Western-inspired moral decay they must deal a blow to its source: the United States.

Zie voor een versie met Nederlandse ondertiteling: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=551664672370888389

The final episode addresses the actual rise of Al-Qaeda. Curtis argues that, after their failed revolutions, bin Laden and Zawahiri had little or no popular support, let alone a serious complex organization of terrorists, and were dependent upon independent operatives to carry out their new call for jihad. The film instead argues that in order to prosecute bin Laden in absentia for the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings, US prosecutors had to prove he was the head of a criminal organization responsible for the bombings. They find a former associate of bin Laden, Jamal al-Fadl, and pay him to testify that bin Laden was the head of a massive terrorist organization called “Al-Qaeda”. With the September 11th attacks, Neo-Conservatives in the new Republican government of George W. Bush use this created concept of an organization to justify another crusade against a new evil enemy, leading to the launch of the War on Terrorism.

After the American invasion of Afghanistan fails to uproot the alleged terrorist network, the Neo-Conservatives focus inwards, searching unsuccessfully for terrorist sleeper cells in America. They then extend the war on “terror” to a war against general perceived evils with the invasion of Iraq in 2003. The ideas and tactics also spread to the United Kingdom where Tony Blair uses the threat of terrorism to give him a new moral authority. The repercussions of the Neo-Conservative strategy are also explored with an investigation of indefinitely-detained terrorist suspects in Guantanamo Bay, many allegedly taken on the word of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance without actual investigation on the part of the United States military, and other forms of “preemption” against non-existent and unlikely threats made simply on the grounds that the parties involved could later become a threat. Curtis also makes a specific attempt to allay fears of a dirty bomb attack, and concludes by reassuring viewers that politicians will eventually have to concede that some threats are exaggerated and others altogether devoid of reality. “In an age when all the grand ideas have lost credibility, fear of a phantom enemy is all the politicians have left to maintain their power.”

Said Qutb (rechts), de ‘geestelijk vader’ van de moderne radicale islamistische beweging en belangrijke inspiratiebron voor Bin Laden en Ayman al Zawahiri, in Amerika (Colorado), jaren veertig

 Ayman al-Zawahiri, begin jaren zeventig

De Bin Laden familie in Stockholm in 1971. Tweede van rechts: de veertienjarige Osama.

foto van een Amerikaanse soldaat in Afghanistan (bron: http://www.demorgen.be/dm/nl/8056/Foto/photoalbum/detail/1087714/803005/87/De-oorlog-in-Afghanistan-deel-3.dhtml )

Ander materiaal dat om verschillende redenen de moeite van het bekijken waard is (van de meest overtrokken complottheorieën, tot buitengewoon zinnige bijdragen):

Loose Change: (de bekendste complotfilm over 9/11)

Zembla: Het Complot van 11 september  (een zinnige weerlegging van vooral Loose Change)

9/11 Press for Truth (een hele zinvolle documentaire, vooral een verslag van een groepje nabestaanden van 9/11 die kritische vragen zijn gaan stellen)

Tegenlicht: De Ijzeren Driehoek (over de belangenverstrengeling van de internationale wapenhandel en de politiek en wie er van de War on Terror profiteert. Vooral gericht op de duistere Carlylegroup. Zeer degelijk)

Tegenlicht: De Berg (over wat de drijfveren van de moslimfundamentalisten zijn. Met oa Karen Armstrong, Benjamin Barber, Manuel Castells, Khozh-Ahmed Noukhaev en Mansour Jachimczyk)

Tegenlicht: De Impact; over de betekenis van 9/11 (met Lawrence Wilkerson, Paul Bremer III en Francis Fukuyama over de betekenis van 9/11, tien jaar later)

Fahrenheit 911 (de grote klassieker van Michael Moore. Bijna alle bovenstaande thema’s komen aan bod, zij het dat het minder degelijk en vooral op een polemische- en soms heel geestige- manier wordt gebracht)

Jason Burke: The 9/11 Wars Een buitengewoon interessante korte voordracht van onderzoeksjournalist Jason Burke (‘The Observer’), over tien jaar 9/11 (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce). Burke heeft meermaals betoogd dat al-Qaeda eerder een constructie, een mythe, is, dan een daadwerkelijk bestaande organisatie of netwerk.

Ook de Nederlandse publieke omroep stond stil bij tien jaar na 9/11. Bekijk hier de serie 9.11 de dag die de wereld veranderde

Belangrijke primaire bronnen:

The Project for a New American Century Belangrijkste site van de Neo-conservatieven

Sayyid Qutb, Milestones/Ma’alim fi’l-tareeq/معالم في الطريق Sayyid Qutbs belangrijkste geschrift uit 1965 online (Engels). Milestones is een van de belangrijkste manifesten van de milante islamistische beweging en inspiratiebron voor bijv. Bin Laden

Over de (in)directe uitvloeisels van 9/11 en ‘The War on Terror’:

The Road to Guantanamo (een onthutsende documentaire over het lot van drie Britse Moslims die onschuldig vastzaten op Guantanamo Bay

Big Storm; the Lynndie England Story Huiveringwekkende documentaire van Twan Huys (2005) over de daders achter het Abu Ghraib schandaal (Engelstalige versie)

No End in Sight  (over het rampzalige beleid van Amerika, na de invasie van Irak)

En last but not least de geweldige serie ‘De Vloek van Osama’, over tien jaar 9/11, van de Belgische journalist Rudi Vranckx (VRT):

Enkele literatuursuggesties (verre van volledig):

  • Karen Armstrong, The Battle for God: Fundamentalism in Judaism, Christianity and Islam, 2000 (in het Nederlands: De Strijd om God. Een geschiedenis van het fundamentalisme, De Bezige Bij, Amsterdam, 2005)
  • Benjamin Barber (die recent nogal in opspraak is geraakt, omdat hij zich zou hebben laten betalen door Qadhafi  en zitting had in de denktank van Saif Qadhafi, ‘The Monitor Group’, zie hier– dit doet mijns inziens echter niets af aan de waarde van dit werk, FS), Jihad versus Mc World; Terrorism’s Challenge to Democracy, Balantine books, New York, 2001 (oorspr. 1995)
  • Jason Burke,  Al-Qaeda: The True Story of Radical Islam, IB Tauris, Londen, 2003
  • Robert Fisk, The Great War for Civilisation; The Conquest of the Middle East, Londen, 2005 (in het Nederlands:  De grote beschavingsoorlog ; de Verovering van het Midden-Oosten, Ambo, 2005)
  • Seymour M. Hersh, Chain of Command: The Road from 9/11 to Abu Ghraib, Haper Collins, New York, 2004 (Nederlands: Bevel van hogerhand; de weg van 11 september tot het Abu Ghraib-Schandaal, De Bezige Bij, Amsterdam, 2004)
  • Gilles Kepel, The roots of radical Islam, Saqi Books,  London,  2005
  • Craig Unger, House of Bush House of Saud: The Secret Relationship Between the World’s Two Most Powerful Dynasties. Gibson Square Books, New York, 2004 (Nederlands: De Familie Bush en het Huis van Saud; de verborgen betrekkingen tussen de twee machtigste dynastieën ter wereld, Mets & Schilt, Amsterdam, 2004)

Update april 2012: The 9/11 Decade – The Clash of Civilizations? (documentaire Al Jazeera) Grote aanrader

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers liken dit: