Mijn hersenspinsels en gedachtekronkels

Exhibition I.M. Ziad Haider- زياد حيدر

Ziad met laatste werk

IM Ziad Haider

Gallery Out in the Field

Warmondstraat 197, Amsterdam

27/5- 27/6/2018
http://www.art-gallery-outinthefied.com

زياد حيدر

Here the Original Dutch version

The abstract works of Ziad Haider (1954, Al-Amara, Iraq-2006 Amsterdam, the Netherlands) can be interpreted as deep reflections on his own turbulent biography, but always indirect, on a highly sublimized level. Born in Iraq and lived through a period of war and imprisonment, and after he found his destiny in the Netherlands, he left an impressive oeuvre.

Ziad Haider studied in the first half of the seventies at the Baghdad Institute of Fine Arts. In the two decades before a flourishing local and original Iraqi art scene was created. From the fifties till the seventies Iraq was one of the leading countries in the Arab world in the field of modern art and culture. Artists like Jewad Selim, Shakir Hassan al-Said and Mahmud Sabri shaped their own version of international modernism. Although these artists were educated abroad (mainly in Europe), after returned to Iraq they founded an art movement which was both rooted in the local traditions of Iraq as fully connected with the international developments in modernist art. They created a strong and steady basis for an Iraqi modern art, unless how much the Iraqi modern art movement would suffer from during the following decades of oppression, war and occupation, so much that it mainly would find its destiny in exile.

The turning-point came during the time Ziad Haider was studying at the academy. Artists who were a member of the ruling Ba’th party- or willing to become one- were promised an even international career with many possibilities to exhibit, as long as they were willing to express their loyalty to the regime, or even sometimes participate in propaganda-projects, like monuments, or portraits and statues of Saddam Husayn. Ziad Haider, who never joined the Ba’th party, was sent into the army.

In 1980 the Iraqi regime launched the long and destructive war with Iran. Many young Iraqis were sent into the army to fight at the frontline. This also happened to Ziad Haider. The Iraq/Iran war was a destructive trench war in which finally one million Iraqis (and also one million Iranians) died. The years of war meant a long interruption in Ziad Haider’s career and live as an artist. It turned out much more dramatic for him, when he was back in Baghdad for a short period at home. He was arrested after he peed on a portrait of Saddam Husayn. Ziad Haider was sent to Abu Ghraib Prison, where he stayed for five years (1986-1990) probably the darkest period of his life. After his time in prison he was sent away to the front again, this time in a new war: the occupation of Kuwait and the following American attack on Iraq.

Ziad 2018 2.jpg

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

After the Intifada of 1991, the massive uprising against the Iraqi regime in the aftermath of the Gulf War, which was violently supressed, Ziad Haider fled Iraq, like many others. After a period of five years in Syria and Jordan he was recognized by the UN as a refugee and was invited to live in the Netherlands, which became his new homeland. With a few paintings and drawings, he arrived 1997 in Amersfoort. After Amersfoort he lived for short a while in Almere and finally in Amsterdam. In first instance it was not simple to start all over again as an artist in his new country. Beside he worked further in his personal style he started to draw portraits in the streets of Amsterdam (the Leidse Plein and the Rembrandtplein). Later he organised, together with the Dutch artist Paula Vermeulen he met during this time and became his partner, several courses in drawing and painting in their common studio. Ziad Haider was very productive in this period and created many different works in different styles. Giving courses in figurative drawing and painting and drawing portraits was for him very important. As he told in a Dutch television documentary on five Iraqi artists in the Netherlands (2004, see here) these activities and the positive interaction with people were for him the best tools to “drive away his nightmares”.

Ziad 2018 1.jpg

In his abstract works, always the main part of his artistic production, he sought the confrontation with the demons from the past. Although abstract there are often some recognisable elements, which are returning in several works during the years. A returning motive is the representation of his feet. This refers to several events from his own life. As a soldier Ziad had to march for days. When he was released from prison, together with some other prisoners, he was the only one who, although heavily tortured on his feet, who was able to stand up and walk. And his feet brought him further, on his long journey into exile, till he finally found a safe place to live and work.

Ziad 2018 3.jpg

The motive of his bare feet is not the only figurative element in his work. In many of his paintings and drawings there are some more or less anthropomorphic elements, often molten together with structures with the appearance of liquid metal. The theme of man and machine plays an important role in the expressive works of Ziad. Of course this is close connected to his own biography and history of war and imprisonment.

In some of his works one can vividly experience a sense of a claustrophobic space, referring to his time spending in the trenches during the war, the interior of the tank and- later- the prison-cell. But all these experiences went through a process of transformation, of abstraction and translated in the language of art. And this art is, unless the underlying struggle, very lyrical in its expression.

Ziad 2018 4.jpg

The also in the Netherlands living Iraqi journalist, poet and critic Karim al-Najar wrote about Ziad Haider: “For a very long time the artist, Ziad Haider, has been living in solitude, prison and rebellion. On this basis, the foregoing works constitute his open protest against the decline, triviality and prominence of half-witted personalities as well as their accession of the authority of art and culture in Iraq for more than two decades. Here we could touch the fruits of the artist’s liberty and its reflection on his works. For Ziad Haider has been able to achieve works showing his artistic talent and high professionalism within a relatively short time. We see him at the present time liberated from his dark, heavy nightmares rapidly into their embodiment through colour and musical symmetry with the different situations. It indeed counts as a visual and aesthetic view of the drama of life as well as man’s permanent question, away from directness, conventionality and false slogans”.

Although he opposed another American war against Iraq, with an uncertain outcome for its people, the end of the Ba’athist regime made it possible to visit his home country after many years of exile. In the autumn of 2003 he visited Iraq for the first time since his long absence in exile. His visit to iraq made a great impression and also influenced his work after. In the last series of paintings he made his use of colours changed dramatically. The explosive use of intense shades of red were replaced for a use of sober browns and greys. The dynamic compositions were changed in regular constructed forms. Also these works, from his last series, are represented on this exhibition.

Ziad meant a lot for many, as an artist, but also as a human being and a friend. Within the community of exiled Iraqi artists in the Netherlands he played a very important role. In 2004 he initiated the Iraqi cultural manifestation in Amsterdam, with the title “I cross the Arch of Darkness”, a quote from a poem by his friend, the also in the Netherlands living Iraqi poet Salah Hassan ( ﺃﻋﺒﺭﻗﻮﺲ ﻟﻟﻆﻻﻢ  ﺃﻮﻤﻰﻋ ﻟﻟﻧﻬﺎﺭ ﺑﻌﻛﺎﺰﻱ  ,  from his collected poems, published under the title “A rebel with a broken compass”, 1997). In this festival visual artists, poets, musicians and actors came together to show the variety and richness of the Iraqi cultual life in exile to a Dutch audience.

During the years Ziad and Paula lived at the Rozengracht in the old centre of Amsterdam, there home was a regular meetingpoint of many exiled Iraqi artists, poets, writers, musicians, actors, journalists and intellectuals. Many will cherish their sweet memories of the sometimes notorious gatherings till deep in the night. His sudden death in 2006 was a great loss for many of us.

The works of Ziad are still here and they deserve to be exhibited (now his second exhibition after he passed away). With this exhibition we celebrate Ziad Haider what he meant as an artist and as a human being.

Floris Schreve

Amsterdam, 2018

Gallery Out in the Field

On this blog (mainly in Dutch):

Tentoonstelling Ziad Haider (Diversity and Art)

Iraakse kunstenaars in ballingschap

Modern and contemporary art of the Middle East and North Africa (English)

See also this In Memoriam of Ziad’s friend, the artcritic  Amer Fatuhi

The opening:

 34645923_1129592660516418_9220194087473250304_n

Tentoonstelling IM Ziad Haider- زياد حيدر

Ziad met laatste werk

IM Ziad Haider

Gallery Out in the Field

Warmondstraat 197, Amsterdam

27/5- 27/6/2018

http://www.art-gallery-outinthefied.com

 

زياد حيدر

Here the English version

Het abstracte werk van Ziad Haider (al-Amara, Irak, 1954-Amsterdam 2006) kan worden gezien als een diep doorleefde reflectie op zijn roerige levensgeschiedenis, zij het altijd in gesublimeerde vorm. Afkomstig uit Irak en, na een periode van oorlog en gevangenschap, uitgeweken naar Nederland, heeft hij, in de jaren dat hij werkzaam in Nederlandse ballingschap was, een groot aantal indrukwekkende werken nagelaten.

Ziad Haider studeerde begin jaren zeventig aan de kunstacademie in Bagdad.
In de twee decennia daarvoor was er in Irak een bloeiende modernistische kunstscene ontstaan. Vanaf de jaren vijftig tot in de jaren zeventig was Irak een van de meest toonaangevende landen op het gebied van moderne kunst en cultuur in de Arabische wereld. Iraakse kunstenaars als Jewad Selim, Shakir Hassan al-Said en Mahmud Sabri creëerden hun eigen versie van het internationale modernisme. Hoewel deze kunstenaars elders (vooral in Europa) waren opgeleid, trachtten zij, teruggekeerd naar hun geboorteland, een moderne kunstscene op te zetten, die zowel geworteld was in de lokale traditie, als aansloot bij de internationale ontwikkelingen. Zij creëerden hiermee een stevige basis voor een heel eigen Iraakse moderne kunsttraditie, hoezeer deze ook onder druk kwam te staan in de daaropvolgende decennia, vol met onderdrukking, oorlog en bezetting, waardoor vele Iraakse kunstenaars noodgedwongen hun werk in ballingschap moesten voortzetten.

In de tijd dat Ziad Haider studeerde kwam net het kantelpunt. Kunstenaars die lid van de regerende Ba’thpartij waren, konden, wanneer zij ook bereid waren om bij gelegenheid mee te werken met de verheerlijking van het regime en de officiële propaganda, soms een glanzende carrière tegemoetzien, tot en met de mogelijkheid tot exposeren in het buitenland. Ziad Haider, die geen lid van de Ba’thpartij was, werd na zijn studietijd meteen het leger ingestuurd.

Kort daarna, begin 1980, stortte het Iraakse regime zich in de oorlog met Iran. Vele jonge Iraki’s werden de oorlog ingestuurd om aan het front als soldaat te dienen en ook Ziad Haider trof dit lot. De Irak/Iran oorlog was een vernietigende loopgravenoorlog, waarin uiteindelijk een miljoen Iraki’s (en een miljoen Iraniërs) de dood vonden. De jaren van oorlog betekenden een lange onderbreking van Ziads loopbaan als kunstenaar. Zijn leven zou nog een veel heviger wending nemen toen hij midden jaren tachtig, gedurende een kort verlof in Bagdad, werd gearresteerd, omdat iemand over hem had geklikt bij de geheime dienst. Hij had over een portret van Saddam geplast. Voor bijna vijf jaar verbleef Ziad Haider in de beruchte Abu Ghraib gevangenis, de donkerste periode van zijn leven (1986-1990). Nadat hij was vrijgelaten werd hij weer terug het leger ingestuurd dat net Koeweit was binnengevallen. Ook de Golfoorlog van 1991 maakte hij volledig mee.

Ziad 2018 2.jpg

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Na de volksopstand tegen het regime van 1991 ontvluchtte hij Irak. Voor vijf jaar verbleef hij achtereenvolgens in Syrië en Jordanië, totdat hij in 1997 als vluchteling aan Nederland werd toegewezen. Met een paar schilderijen en een serie tekeningen, kwam hij aan in ons land, waar hij terecht kwam in Amersfoort. Na Amersfoort woonde hij voor korte tijd in Almere en vervolgens in Amsterdam. Net als voor veel van zijn lotgenoten, was het in eerste instantie niet makkelijk om zich hier als kunstenaar te vestigen. Naast dat hij doorwerkte aan zijn persoonlijke stijl, werkte hij ook veel als portrettist en tekende hij portretten van passanten op het Leidse Plein en het Rembrandtplein. Later gaf hij, samen met Paula Vermeulen, die hij in die tijd ontmoette, ook verschillende teken- en schildercursussen in hun gemeenschappelijke atelier. Ziad Haider was in deze periode zeer productief, werkte met verschillende technieken in verschillende stijlen. Juist het werken met zijn cursisten of het tekenen van portretten op straat waren voor hem een belangrijke bron levenslust, zoals hij dat een keer verklaarde voor de IKON televisie, in een documentaire uit 2003: “Een manier om de terugkerende nachtmerries te verdrijven” (Factor, Ikon, 17-6-2003, zie hier).

Ziad 2018 1.jpg

In zijn abstracte werk ging Ziad Haider juist de confrontatie aan met de heftige gebeurtenissen uit zijn leven van de jaren daarvoor. In deze werken duiken ook een paar herkenbare elementen op, die regelmatig terugkeren in verschillende werken. Een motief dat op verschillende manieren terugkeert, is de weergave van zijn voeten. Dit gegeven refereert aan verschillende gebeurtenissen in zijn leven. Als soldaat moest Ziad Haider vaak lange marsen afleggen. Toen hij uit de gevangenis werd vrijgelaten was hij de enige van zijn medegevangenen die nog amper in staat was om op zijn voeten te staan. En natuurlijk hebben zijn voeten hem verder gedragen, op zijn lange reis in ballingschap, totdat hij uiteindelijk een veilige plaats vond.

Ziad 2018 3.jpg

Het motief van de voeten is niet het enige herkenbare gegeven in Ziads werken. Vaak zijn er min of meer antropomorfe elementen te ontdekken. Deze lijken vaak versmolten met vormen die doen denken aan gloeiend metaal. Het thema mens en machine speelt in het werk van Ziad een belangrijke rol. Ook dit thema hangt vanzelfsprekend nauw samen met zijn eigen geschiedenis van oorlog en gevangenschap.
Voelbaar is in sommige werken ook de claustrofobische ruimte, die refereert aan zijn verblijf in de loopgraven, de tank en daarna de cel, al zijn deze ervaringen altijd door een transformatieproces gegaan, waardoor ze zijn te vervatten in kunst. En deze kunst heeft, ondanks de strijd, vaak een buitengewoon lyrisch karakter.

Ziad 2018 4.jpg

De in Nederland wonende Iraakse journalist, dichter en criticus Karim al-Najar over Ziad Haider: ‘For a very long time the artist, Ziad Haider, has been living in solitude, prison and rebellion. On this basis, the foregoing works constitute his open protest against the decline, triviality and prominence of half-witted personalities as well as their accession of the authority of art and culture in Iraq for more than two decades. Here we could touch the fruits of the artist’s liberty and its reflection on his works. For Ziad Haider has been able to achieve works showing his artistic talent and high professionalism within a relatively short time. We see him at the present time liberated from his dark, heavy nightmares rapidly into their embodiment through colour and musical symmetry with the different situations. It indeed counts as a visual and aesthetic view of the drama of life as well as man’s permanent question, away from directness, conventionality and false slogans’.
Hoe zeer hij ook zijn bedenkingen had bij de Amerikaanse invasie van Irak in 2003, het betekende voor Ziad wel een mogelijkheid om weer zijn geboorteland te bezoeken. In de herfst van 2003 zette hij deze stap. Zijn bezoek aan Irak maakte grote indruk en had ook zijn weerslag op de laatste serie werken die hij maakte. Allereerst veranderde zijn palet. Het intense rood, dat zijn werken voor die tijd sterk had gedomineerd, werd vervangen door sobere bruinen en grijzen. De heftige bewegingen in zijn composities maakten plaats voor een regelmatiger opbouw. Ook dat werk, uit zijn laatste reeks, is op deze tentoonstelling te zien.
Ziad heeft veel betekend als kunstenaar, maar verder was hij ook een belangrijk figuur binnen de Iraakse kunstscene in ballingschap. Zo was hij de initiatiefnemer van het de manifestatie “Ik stap over de Boog van Duisternis; Iraakse kunstenaars in Amsterdam”. Onder deze titel , die verwijst naar een zin uit een gedicht van de dichter en Ziads vriend Salah Hassan, (  “ﺃﻋﺒﺭﻗﻮﺲ ﻟﻟﻆﻻﻢ ﺃﻮﻤﻰﻋ ﻟﻟﻧﻬﺎﺭ ﺑﻌﻛﺎﺰﻱ ” , uit de bundel Een rebel met een kapot kompas, 1997), werd er in 2004 een Iraaks cultureel festival in Amsterdam georganiseerd, waarin verschillende uit Irak afkomstige beeldende kunstenaars, dichters, musici en acteurs centraal stonden.
Gedurende de jaren dat Ziad en Paula samen aan de Rozengracht woonden, was hun huis een trefpunt van vele Iraakse beeldende kunstenaars, maar ook dichters, schrijvers, musici, acteurs en journalisten. Velen zullen dierbare herinneringen koesteren aan deze roemruchte avonden. Het plotselinge overlijden van Ziad Haider in 2006 kwam dan ook als een grote klap.
Zijn werk is er gelukkig nog en verdient het om getoond te worden. Met deze tentoonstelling vieren wij wat hij als kunstenaar en als mens heeft betekend.

Floris Schreve
Amsterdam, mei 2018

Gallery Out in the Field

Verder op dit blog:

Tentoonstelling Ziad Haider (Diversity and Art)

Iraakse kunstenaars in ballingschap

Zie ook deze In Memoriam van de Iraakse kunstcriticus Amer Fatuhi

De opening:

34645923_1129592660516418_9220194087473250304_n

Exhibition of Mahmoud Sabri in London (25th June – 6th July, La Galleria Pall Mall)

محمود صبري

M.Sabri_1[1]

Mahmoud Sabri (1927-2012)

This summer (25th June – 6th July) a very unique and special exhibition will be held in London: ‘Mahmoud Sabri; a retrospective’. Mahmoud Sabri (1927-2012) was one of the leading artists of Iraq, for many one of ‘the big three’ who were crucial for the Iraqi modern art movement, as mentioned by the Iraqi artist Ali Assaf (Rome), in the introduction of ‘Acqua Ferita’ (‘Wounded Water’), the catalogue of the Iraqi Pavilion at the Venice Biennial of 2011 (see also here on this blog). Unless the other two, Jewad Selim and Shakir Hassan al-Said (also discussed a few times on this blog, like here) the role of Mahmoud Sabri seems almost being erased from history. In most literature he isn’t even mentioned, or at least as a footnote, without showing one of his works. Also for me it was not easy to find a proper reproduction of one of his works, till around 2010, when his daughter Yasmin Sabri (working as a computer scientist based in London) launched a website with many of his works and writings.

The main reason that Sabri seems to be forgotten is that he was a dissident of the regime of the Ba’thparty from the very first moment. When the Ba’thists for the first time came to power, in 1963 , Sabri wrote a manifesto in which he stipulated the fascist nature of the new regime. Immediately after he went into exile. For decades he lived in Prague, during the years of the Cold War, so out of sight of Western critics and exhibition-makers, who started gradually to pay some interest in the modern art of the Middle East. Also later he became for many too much an outsider or exile, to be discussed in the history of the modern art movement of Iraq or the Middle East in general. Although he lived the last decade of his live in London, where many initiatives took place in the field of contemporary art of the Middle East, both in literature as in several exhibitions, his importance for the Iraqi modern art and contemporary art wasn’t really recognised.

He was never forgotten by many Iraqi artists. Very often I heard, when I was interviewing the Iraqi artists in exile here in the Netherlands, that Sabri was one of the greatest pioneers and an important key-figure, in pushing the Iraqi modern art forward. Many of them consider Sabri as a symbolic teacher and a source of inspiration. For example, when in 2000 thirty Iraqi artists, based in the Netherlands, came together to held a group exhibition in The Hague, they dedicated this initiative to Mahmoud Sabri.

For me it is a great pleasure to announce this wonderful initiative by Yasmin Sabri and Lamice el-Amari, professor theatre studies based in Berlin. Later this month I will visit this exhibition myself and will write an extensive article on Mahmoud Sabri, in which I also will discuss this exhibition.

From http://www.lagalleria.org/section697199.html:

 97percent_human[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, 97 percent Human

Mahmoud Sabri

Mahmoud Sabri – A Retrospective

An exhibition of the pioneering Iraqi artist Mahmoud Sabri
25th June – 6th July

The exhibition features the work of the pioneering Iraqi artist Mahmoud Sabri (1927 – 2012) and takes us through his lifetime journey, from his early work that reflected the suffering of the Iraqi people to his pursuit of a new form of art that represented the atomic level of reality revealed by modern science which he termed “Quantum Realism”.
At the age of forty, Sabri started working on the relationship between art and science, and its link to social development. In 1971 he published his Manifesto of the New Art of Quantum Realism (QR). QR is the application of the scientific method in the field of art and graphically represents the complex processes in nature. In his words, “Art is now the last area of human activity to which the scientific method is still not applied”.
His Quantum Realism collection is displayed for the first time in the UK. The exhibition presents a unique opportunity to see a comprehensive collection of Sabri’s work spanning over 4 decades.
Mahmoud Sabri was born in Baghdad in 1927, he studied social sciences at Loughborough University in the late forties. While in England, his interest in painting developed and he attended evening art classes. Following university, he worked in banking and at the early age of 32 he became the deputy head of the largest national bank in Iraq, the Al-Rafidain Bank. He resigned from the bank to take the responsibility for establishing the first Exhibitions Department in Iraq and to set up the first international exhibition in Baghdad in 1960. Following that, he decided to focus on painting, resigned from his job and went to study art academically at the Surikov Institute for Art in Moscow 1961-1963. After the Baathist coup d’état in Iraq (1963), he moved to Prague to join the Committee for the Defence of the Iraqi People. His paintings during that period reflected the suffering of the Iraqi people under that regime. From the late 60s he started working on Quantum Realism and continued to develop it until his death in April 2012 in the UK.
Mahmoud Sabri was a member of the Iraqi Avant-garde artists group. He was a founder member of the Society of Iraqi Artists. He had several publications on art, philosophy and politics (in Arabic and English). He lived most of his life in exile. (More info on QR on www.quantumrealism.co.uk )

Events
29th June, 14:00 – 15:30: Artist Satta Hashem will give a lecture and a guided tour of Sabri’s work
3rd July, 18.00 – 20.00: Symposium – Mahmoud Sabri and art in Iraq. Includes a panel discussion and documentary films

The exhibition is open 25th June – 6th July, 2013
Mon -Saturday: 11:00 – 19:00
Sunday 30th Jun: 12:00 – 18:00
Saturday 6th Jul: 11:00 – 17:00

 

La Galleria Pall Mall
30, Royal Opera Arcade
London SW1Y4UY

Extract_from_Watani_My_Country-60s[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, extract from ‘Watani’ (My Country), 1960’s

Mother[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, ‘Mother’

Hydrogen_Atom_-_1990s[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, Hydrogyn Atom (1990’s)

Air_-2[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, Air- 2

Water_._Salt_and_Vinegar[1]

Mahmoud Sabri, Water, Salt and Vinegar

More is coming after I visited the exhibition myself. See for more information: http://www.lagalleria.org/section697199.html

More on Mahmoud Sabri: www.quantumrealism.co.uk

Update (2-7-2013): An impression of the exhibition (more details will follow later)

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Mahumoud Sabri, The Hero, oil on canvas, 1963

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

 

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

photos by Floris Schreve

My Beautiful Enemy; Farhad Foroutanian & Qassim Alsaedy (exhibition Diversity & Art, Amsterdam)

Flyer/handout exhibition (pdf)

قاسم الساعدي و فرهاد فروتنیان

Qassim en Farhad

Farhad Foroutanian and Qassim Alsaedy (photo: Nasrin Ghasemzade)

My Beautiful Enemy  –  دشمن زیبای من  –  عدوي الجميل

Farhad Foroutanian &  Qassim Alsaedy

Mesopotamia and Persia, Iraq and Iran. Two civilizations, two fertile counties in an arid environment. The historical Garden of Eden and the basis of civilization in the ancient world. But also the area were many wars were fought, from the antiquity to the present.The recent war between Iraq and Iran (1980-1988) left deep traces in the lives and the works of the artists

The artists Qassim Alsaedy (Iraq) and Farhad Foroutanian (Iran) both lived through the last gruesome conflict. Both artists, now living in exile in the Netherlands, took the initiative for this exhibition to reflect on this dark historical event, which marked the recent history of their homelands and their personal lives. Neither Farhad nor Qassim ever chose being eachother’s enemies. To the contrary, these two artists make a statement with ‘My Beautiful Enemy’ to confirm their friendship.

Farhad 1

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

Farhad Foroutanian

Farhad Foroutanian (Teheran 1957) studied one and a half year at the theatre academy, before he went to the art academy of Teheran in 1975. At that time the Iranian capital was famous for its hybrid and international oriented art scene. Artists worked in many styles, from pop-art till the traditional miniature painting, a tradition of more than thousand years,  in which  Foroutanian was trained.

After his education Foroutanian found a job as a political cartoonist at a newspaper. During that time, in 1978, the revolution came, which overthrew the regime of the Pahlavi Shah Dynasty. For many Iranian intellectuals and also for Foroutanian in the beginning the revolution came as a liberation. The censorship of the Shah was dismissed and the revolution created a lot of energy and creativity. A lot of new newspapers were founded. But this outburst of new found freedom didn’t last for long; in the middle of 1979 it became clear that the returned Ayatollah Khomeiny became the new ruler and founded the new Islamic Republic. Censorship returned on a large and villain scale and, in case of the cartoonists, it became clear that they could work as long as they declared their loyalty to the message and the new ideology of the Islamic Republic.

Farhad 2

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

The artistic climate became more and more restrictive. In the mid eighties Foroutanian fled his homeland. In 1986 he arrived with his family in the Netherlands.  Since that time Foroutanian manifested himself in several ways, as an independent artist, as a cartoonist and as actor/ theatre maker (most of the time together with his wife, the actress Nasrin Ghasemzade Khoramabadi).

Farhad 3

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

In his mostly small scaled paintings and drawings Foroutanian shows often a lonely figure of a man, often just a silhouette or a shadow, who tries to deal with an alienating or even surrealistic environment. This melancholical  figure, sometimes represented as a motionless observer, sometimes involved in actions which are obviously useless or failing, represents  the loneliness of the existence of an exile. Foroutanian:

“If you live in exile you can feel at home anywhere.  The situation and location in which an artist is operating, determines his way of looking at theworld. If he feels himself at home nowhere,  becomes what the artist produces is very bizarre.

The artist in exile is always looking for the lost identity. How can you find yourself in this strange situation? That is what the artist in exile constantly has to deal with. You can think very rationally and assume that the whole world is your home, but your roots- where you grew up and where you originally belong-are so important.It defines who you are and how you will develop. If the circumstances dictates that you can’t visit the place where your origins are, that has serious consequences. You miss it. You are uncertain if you have ever the chance to see this place again. The only option you have is to create your own world, to fantasize about it. But you can’t lose yourself in this process. You need to keep a connection with the reality, with the here and now.  Unfortunately this is very difficult and for some even something impossible. You live in another dimension. You see things different than others ”.

Farhad 4

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

In his works the lonely figures are often represented with a suitcase. Foroutanian:

“A case with everything you own in it. Miscellaneous pieces of yourself are packed. And the case is never opened. You carry it from one to another place. And sometimes you open the trunk a little and do something new. But you never open the suitcase completely and you never unpack everything. That’sexile”.

Foroutanian emphasizes that his political drawings were for him personally his anker that prevented him to drift off from reality. The concept of exile is the most important theme in Foroutanian’s work, in his paintings, drawings, but also in his theatre work, like Babel (2007) or  No-one’s Land (Niemandsland, 2010). In all his expressions  the lonely figure is not far away, just  accompanied with his closed suitcase and often long shadow.

Farhad 5

 Farhad Foroutanian, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 2013

Foroutanian participated in several exhibitions, in the Netherlands and abroad. He also worked  as a cartoonist for some Dutch magazines and newspapers, like Vrij Nederland, Het Algemeen Dagblad and Het Rotterdams Dagblad. Like Qassim Alsaedy he exhibited at an earlier occasion in D&A.

The quotes of Foroutanian are English translations of an interview with the artist in Dutch, by Floor Hageman, on the occasion of a performance of Bertold Brecht’s ‘Der gute Mensch von Sezuan’ (‘ The Good Person of Szechwan’), Toneelgroep de Appel, The Hague, see http://www.toneelgroepdeappel.nl/voorstelling/153/page/1952/Interview_met_Iraanse_cartoonist_Farhad_Foroutanian

Qassim 1

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, oil on canvas,  2009

Qassim Alsaedy

Qassim Alsaedy (Baghdad 1949) studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Baghdad during the seventies. One of his teachers was Shakir Hassan al-Said, one of the leading artists of Iraq and perhaps one of the most influential artists of the Arab and even Muslim world of twentieth century. During his student years in the seventies Alsaedy came in conflict with the regime of the Ba’th party. He was arrested and spent nine months in the notorious al-Qasr an-Nihayyah, the Palace of the End, the precursor of the Abu Ghraib prison.

After that time it was extremely difficult for Alsaedy to settle himself as an artist in Iraq. Alsaedy: “Artists who didn’t join the party and worked for the regime had to find their own way”. For Alsaedy it meant he had to go in exile. He lived alternately in Lebanon and in the eighties in Iraqi Kurdistan, where he lived with the Peshmerga (Kurdish rebels). When the regime in Baghdad launched operation ‘Anfal’ , the infamous genocidal campaign against the Kurds, Alsaedy went to Libya, where he was a lecturer at the art academy of Tripoli for seven years. Finally he came to the Netherlands in the mid nineties.

Qassim 2

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, mixed media, 2012/2013

The work of Alsaedy is deeply rooted in the tradition of the Iraqi art of the twentieth century, although of course he is also influenced by his new homeland. The most significant aspect of Alsaedy’s work is his use of abstract signs, almost a kind of inscriptions he engraves in the layers of oil paint in his works. Alsaedy:

“In my home country it is sometimes very windy. When the wind blows the air is filled with dust. Sometimes it can be very dusty you can see nothing. Factually this is the dust of Babylon, Ninive, Assur, the first civilisations. This is the dust you breath, you have it on your body, your clothes, it is in your memory, blood, it is everywhere, because the Iraqi civilisations had been made of clay. We are a country of rivers, not of stones. The dust you breath it belongs to something. It belongs to houses, to people or to some texts. I feel it in this way; the ancient civilisations didn’t end. The clay is an important condition of making life. It is used by people and then it becomes dust, which falls in the water, to change again in thick clay. There is a permanent circle of water, clay, dust, etc. It is how life is going on and on. I have these elements in me. I use them not because I am homesick, or to cry for my beloved country. No it is more than this. I feel the place and I feel the meaning of the place. I feel the voices and the spirits in those dust, clay, walls and air. In this atmosphere I can find a lot of elements which I can reuse or recycle. You can find these things in my work; some letters, some shadows, some voices or some traces of people. On every wall you can find traces. The wall is always a sign of human life”.

Qassim 3

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, mixed media, 2012/2013

The notion of a sign of a wall which symbolizes human life is something Alseady experienced during his time in prison. In his cell he could see the marks carved by other prisoners in the walls as a sign of life and hope.

Later, in Kurdistan, Alsaedy saw the burned landscapes after the bombardments of the Iraqi army. Alsaedy:

“ Huge fields became totally black. The houses, trees, grass, everything was black. But look, when you see the burned grass, late in the season, you could see some little green points, because the life and the beauty is stronger than the evilness. The life was coming through. So you saw black, but there was some green coming up. For example I show you this painting which is extremely black, but it is to deep in my heart. Maybe you can see it hardly but when you look very sensitive you see some little traces of life. You see the life is still there. It shines through the blackness. The life is coming back”.

Qassim 4

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, mixed media, 2012/2013

Another important element in Alsaedy’s mixed media objects is his use of rusted nails or empty gun cartridges. For Alsaedy the nails and the cartridges symbolize the pain, the human suffering and the ugliness of war. But also these elements will rust away and leave just an empty trace of their presence. Life will going on and the sufferings of the war will be once a part of history.

His ceramic objects creates Alsaedy together with the artist Brigitte Reuter. Reuter creates the basic form, while Alsaedy brings on the marks and the first colors. Together they finish the process by baking and glazing the objects.

Qassim 5

Qassim Alsaedy, untitled, mixed media, 2012/2013

Since Alsaedy came to the Netherlands he participated in many exhibitions, both solo and group. His most important were his exhibition at the Flehite Museum Amersfoort (2006) and Museum Gouda (2012). He regularly exhibits in the Gallery of Frank Welkenhuysen in Utrecht.

Floris Schreve, Amsterdam, 2013

My Beautiful enemy

28 April- 26 May 2013

O P E N I N G op zondag 28 april om 16.00uur – deur open om 15.00 uur
door Emiel Barendsen – Programma Director Tropentheater

logo Diversity & Art

http://www.diversityandart.com/

Diversity & Art | Sint Nicolaasstraat 21 | 1012 NJ Amsterdam | open: do 13.00 – 19.00 | vr t/m za 13.00 – 17.00

عدوي الجميل

قاسم الساعدي وفرهاد فوروتونيان

يسرنا دعوتكم لحضور افتتاح المعرض المشترك للفنانين قاسم الساعدي ( العراق) وفرهاد فوروتونيان ( ايران ) , الساعة الرابعة من بعد ظهر يوم الاحد الثامن والعشرين من نيسان- ابريل 2013

وذلك على فضاء كاليري دي اند أ

الذي يقع على مبعدة مسيرة عشرة دقائق من محطة قطار امستردام المركزية , خلف القصر الملكي

تفتتح الصالة بتمام الساعة الثالثة

Een kleine impressie van de tentoonstelling (foto’s Floris Schreve):

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

tentoonstelling 2

tentoonstelling 3

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

tentoonstelling 10

tentoonstelling 7

tentoonstelling 6

Opening

Opening 2

Emiel Barendsen (foto Floris Schreve)

Dames en heren, goedemiddag,

Toen Herman Divendal mij benaderde met het verzoek een openingswoord tot u te richten ter gelegenheid van de duo expositie van Qassim Alsaedy en Farhad Foroutanian moest ik een moment stilstaan. Immers, ik ben de man die ruim 35 jaar werkzaam is in de podiumkunsten. Weliswaar altijd de niet-westerse podiumkunsten maar toch…podiumkunsten. Herman vertelde mij toen dat hij graag dit soort gelegenheden te baat neemt om anderen dan de usual suspects hun licht te laten schijnen op de tentoongestelde werken. Mooie gedachte die ik met hem deel.
Als Hoofd Programmering en interim directeur van het helaas opgeheven Tropentheater was ik in de gelegenheid om veel te reizen op zoek naar nieuwe artiesten en producties die wij belangrijk en interessant vonden om aan het Nederlandse publiek voor te stellen. In die queste ben je op zoek naar elementen die aan dat specifieke raamwerk appelleren: nieuwsgierigheid, avontuurlijkheid, vakmanschap en ambachtelijkheid, authenticiteit en identiteit maar bovenal de eigen signatuur van de makers.
Beide kunstenaars hier vertegenwoordigd vertellen ons mede op zoek te zijn naar identiteit, beide zijn gevlucht uit hun moederland , beide delen een gezamenlijk bestaan; een gedwongen toekomst. En identiteit is verworden tot een lastig te hanteren begrip in de Nederlandse samenleving anno nu. Sinds de opkomst van populistische partijen hebben wij de mondvol over dé Nederlandse cultuur en identiteit ; maar waar bestaat die in vredesnaam uit. Ik heb er de canon van Nederland nog een op nageslagen en als je het hebt over kunst en cultuur frappeert de constatering dat het juist de externe influx is geweest – en nog immer is – die ons Nederlands DNA bepaalt. Aan de vooravond van een Koningswisseling constateren we dat na de Duits-Oostenrijkse, Engelse, Franse en Spaanse adel de elite van de nieuwe wereld hun opwachting maakt in de Nederlandse monarchie. De ultieme uiting van globalisering. Argentinië nota bene een land opgebouwd uit door conquistadores verkrachte indianen aangevuld met voor armoe gevluchte Sicilianen, Ashkenazische joden, Duitse boeren , Britse gelukzoekers en nazaten van de Westafrikaanse slaven die – behalve hun ritme – de Rio de la Plata niet mochten oversteken, levert de nieuwe Koningin. Wat is onze Nederlandse identiteit eigenlijk als onze kunsthistorische canon vooral gebouwd is op het –wellicht door pragmatisme ingegeven- asiel dat wij boden aan gevluchte kunstenaars: geen Gouden Eeuw zonder Vlamingen, Hugenoten, Sefardische Joden of Armeniers. ‘Onze’ succesvolste nog levende beeldend kunstenares, Marlene Duma, is van Zuid Afrikaanse oorsprong.
Vanuit mijn vakgebied huldig ik het principe dat men tradities moet begrijpen om het hedendaagse te kunnen duiden. Dit geldt niet alleen voor de podiumkunsten maar in mijn optiek ook voor de beeldende kunst. Traditie als conditio sine qua non voor modernisering.
Over de grenzen kijken betekent vooral eerst jezelf leren kennen; wat vind ik mooi, interessant en vooral waarom? Wat zijn die verhalen die je observeert en hoort en in welke culturele context moet ik die plaatsten?
Je laten leiden door je eigen nieuwsgierigheid levert een grote geestelijke verrijking op.
‘My beautiful enemy’ is de titel van deze expositie en verwijst naar het Irak – Iran conflict uit de jaren tachtig van vorige eeuw. Twee buurlanden gebouwd op de civilisaties en dynastieën die de bakermat van onze beschaving vormen. Een gebied dat een lange geschiedenis van conflicten kent maar waar de culturele overeenkomsten groter blijken te zijn dan de verschillen. In samenlevingen waarin de kunstenaar de mond gesnoerd wordt en waar kritische noten niet meer gehoord mogen worden rest vaak maar één pijnlijke optie: ballingschap. Huis en haard worden verlaten om elders in de wereld een nieuw bestaan op te bouwen. Dit proces is voor iedere balling moeilijk en eenzaam; de geschiedenis verankerd in je geheugen is de basis waar je op terugvalt. Mijmeringen over kleuren, geuren, geluiden en smaken van je geboortegrond bijeengehouden door verhalen.
En dat zie je terug in de hier tentoongestelde werken: als ik de werken van Qassim Alsaedy observeer dan herken ik de vakman die in een beeldende taal abstracte verhalen vertelt die een appèl doen op zijn geboortegrond. Als ik mijn ogen luik verbeeld ik mij het landschap te ruiken en hoor ik bij het ene werk de zanger Kazem al Saher op de achtergrond en bij het andere poëtische werk de oud-speler Munir Bachir zachtjes tokkelen.
Farhad Foroutanian gebruikt een ander idioom en zijn stijl verraadt zijn achtergrond als cartoonist. In ogenschijnlijk een paar klare lijnen zet hij zijn figuren neer in een welhaast surreëel decorum. De man met de koffers doet mij terugdenken aan mijn eigen jeugd die ik doorbracht in Zuid-Amerika. Toen aan de vooravond van de gruwelijke Pinochet-coup in Chili de dreiging alsmaar toenam zetten mijn ouder twee koffers klaar waarin de meest noodzakelijke spullen zaten om eventueel te moeten vluchten. Paspoorten en baar geld, kleding en toiletartikelen. Wij moesten niet vluchten, gelukkig, maar werden wel verzocht het land te verlaten. Onze nieuwe bestemming werd het door een burgeroorlog geteisterde Colombia en hoewel dat geweld voornamelijk in de jungle ver van de grote steden plaatsvond waren er momenten dat dat geweld angstig dichtbij kwam. En weer stonden die twee koffers onder handbereik.
Zo blijkt dat deze werken prikkelen en vragen stellen. Het is aan het individu echter om daar invulling aan te geven . Daarover te praten met anderen levert vanzelf weer nieuwe verhalen op.
In een tijd waarin de overheid net doet of diversiteit niet meer van deze tijd is en moedwillig aanstuurt op ondubbelzinnige eenvormigheid ben ik blij dat er nog een plek in Amsterdam is waar men deze prachtige kunst kan aanschouwen.
Ik besluit met het motto “tegenwind is wat de vlieger doet stijgen” en wens Qassim en Farhad alle goeds toe. En u als publiek veel kijkgenot.

Dank u.
Emiel Barendsen

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Farhad Foroutanian en Qassim Alsaedy (foto Floris Schreve)

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

In Front (left): Qassim Alsaedy, the Dutch/Iraqi Kurdish writer Ibrahim Selman and the actress Nasrin Ghasemzade (the wife of Farhad Foroutanian)

opening 4

Bart Top, Farhad Foroutanian and Ishan Mohiddin

opening 5

The Iraqi Kudish artists Hoshyar Rasheed and Aras Kareem (who exhibited in D&A before, see here and here), Ishan Mohiddin and Jwana Omer (the wife of Aras Kareem)

De Volkskrant (vrijdag 3 mei 2013):

Volkskrant

Lecture: A history of Iraqi modern art and Iraqi artists in the Diaspora, on the occasion of the exhibition ‘Distant Dreams; the other face of Iraq’, Kunstliefde (Utrecht)

http://onglobalandlocalart.wordpress.com/2012/02/28/

Handout of my lecture on Iraqi modern art and Iraqi artists in the Diaspora, Kunstliefde, Utrecht, The Netherlands, 24 February 2012, on the occasion of the exhibition Distant Dreams;  five Iraqi artists in the Netherlands (Baldin Ahmad, Qassim Alsaedy, Salam Djaaz, Awni Sami and Araz Talib), with the addition of some of the visual material (click on the pictures to enlarge)

Introduction on the history and geography of Iraq

Origins and development of the Iraqi modern art (from 1950)

 

             

Jewad Selim              Faeq Hassan               Shakir Hassan al-Said

        

             

Mahmud Sabri             Dhia Azzawi                Rafa al-Nasiri   

         

Mohammed Mohreddin          Hanaa Mal-Allah

Art and mass-propaganda under the rule of the Ba’th Party

 

Al-Nasb al-Shaheed (‘The Martyr’s Monument’, by Ismael Fattah al-Turk)

Bab al-Nasr ( ‘Victory Arch’,  designed by Saddam Husayn and executed by Khalid al-Rahal and Mohammed Ghani Hikmet)

     

Statues and portraits of Saddam Husayn and Michel Aflaq (founder of the Ba’thparty)

 

 

Iraqi artists in the Diaspora

The Netherlands:

                

 Baldin Ahmad            Aras Kareem           Hoshyar Rasheed

                  

Araz Talib             Awni Sami          Salam Djaaz

     

Qassim Alsaedy        Ziad Haider        Nedim Kufi

 

Some Iraqi artists in other countries:

           

Rebwar Saeed (England)         Anahit Sarkes (England)

          

Jananne al-Ani (England)      Ahmed al-Sudani (United States) 

       

Walid Siti (England)       Halim Al Kareem (Netherlands/United States) 

         

Adel Abidin (Finland)         Azad Nanakeli (Italy)

    

Ali Assaf (Italy)       Wafaa Bilal (United States)

 

On the screen a work of Mahmud Sabri, one of the most experimental Iraqi artists in history

A work of Jewad Selim, more or less the ‘founder of the Iraqi modern art’

On the screen a work of Shakir Hassan al-Said, whose style influenced artists all over the Arab and even the islamic world

Left (in front) Qassim Alsaedy. Me behind the laptop. Behind me (left side) my sister Leonie Schreve and her partner Anand Kanhai. Behind them the Iraqi artist Ali Talib. Second right of me Brigitte Reuter, who created many works together with Qassim Alsaedy. On the walls (right) the work of Awni Sami

Left behind me Martin van der Randen, curator of this exhibition. Left on the wall the work of Baldin Ahmad

Floris Schreve

 فلوريس سحرافا
 
Photos during the lecture by Liesbeth Schreve-Brinkman

Modern and contemporary art of the Middle East and North Africa

http://onglobalandlocalart.wordpress.com/2011/12/07/modern-and-contemporary-art-of-the-middle-east-and-north-africa-2/

الفن المعاصر في العالم العربي وإيران

Since the recent developments in Tunisia and Egypt and probably to follow in other Arab countries, even the mainstream media have noticed that in the Arab world and Iran there is a desire for freedom and democracy. While in the Western World  often reduced to essentialist clichés of the traditional Arab or the Muslim extremists the recent events show the opposite. The orientalist paradigm, as Edward Said has defined in 1978, or even the ‘neo-orientalist’ version (according to Salah Hassan), virulent since 9 / 11, are denounced by the images of Arab satellite channels like Al Jazeera. It proofs that there are definitely progressive and freedom-loving forces in the Middle East, as nowadays becomes  visible for the whole world.

Wafaa Bilal (Iraq, US), from his project ‘Domestic Tension’, 2007 (see for more http://wafaabilal.com/html/domesticTension.html )

Since the last few years there is an increasing interest in contemporary art from that region. Artists such as Mona Hatoum (Palestine), Shirin Neshat (Iran) and the architect Zaha Hadid (Iraq) were already visible in the international art circuit. Since the last five to ten years there are a number of names added, like Ghada Amer (Egypt), Akram Zaatari and Walid Ra’ad (Lebanon), Fareed Armaly and Emily Jacir (Palestine), Mounir Fatmi (Morocco), Farhad Mosheri ( Iran), Ahmed Mater (Saudi Arabia), Mohammed al- Shammerey  and Wafaa Bilal (Iraq). Most of these artists are working and living in the Western World.

Afbeelding49

Walid Ra’ad/The Atlas Group (Lebanon), see http://www.theatlasgroup.org/index.html, at Documenta 11, Kassel, 2002

Mounir Fatmi (Morocco), The Connections, installation, 2003 – 2009, see http://www.mounirfatmi.com/2installation/connexions01.html

Yet the phenomenon of modern and contemporary art in the Middle East isn’t something of last decades. From the end of World War I, when most Arab countries arose in its present form, artists in several countries have sought manners to create their own form of international modernism. Important pioneers were Mahmud Mukhtar (since the twenties and thirties in Egypt), Jewad Selim (forties and fifties in Iraq), or Muhammad Melehi and Farid Belkahia (from the sixties in Morocco). These artists were the first who, having been trained mostly in the West, introduced modernist styles in their homeland. Since that time, artists in several Arab countries draw inspiration from both international modernism, and from traditions of their own cultural heritage.

Shakir Hassan al-Said (Iraq), Objective Contemplations, oil on board, 1984, see http://universes-in-universe.org/eng/nafas/articles/2008/shakir_hassan_al_said/photos/08

Ali Omar Ermes (Lybia/UK), Fa, Ink and acryl on paper

The latter was not something noncommittal. In the decolonization process, the artists often explicitly took a stand against western colonialism. Increasing local traditions here was used often as a strategy. From the late sixties also other factors play a role. “Pan-Arabism” or even the search for a “Pan-Islamic identity” had an impact on the arts. This is obvious in what the French Moroccan art historian Brahim Alaoui  called ‘l’ Ecole de Signe’,  the ‘school of sign’. Abstract calligraphy and decorative traditions of Islamic art, were in many variations combined with contemporary abstract art. The main representatives of this unique tendency of modern Islamic art were Shakir Hassan al-Said (Iraq, deceased in 2004), and the still very active artists as Rachid Koraichi (Algeria, lives and works in France), Ali Omar Ermes (Libya, lives and works in England) and Wijdan Ali (Jordan). This direction found even a three dimensional variant, in the sculptures of the Iranian artist Parviz Tanavoli.

Laila Shawa (Palestine), Gun for Palestine (from ‘The Walls of Gaza’), silkscreen on canvas, 1995

What is particularly problematic for the development of contemporary art of the Middle East are the major crises of recent decades. The dictatorial regimes, the many wars, or, in the case of Palestine, the Israeli occupation,  have often been a significant obstacle for the devolopment of the arts. If the arts were encouraged, it was often for propaganda purposes, with Iraq being the most extreme example (the many portraits and statues of Saddam Hussein speak for themselves). Many artists saw themselves thus forced to divert in the Diaspora (especially Palestinian and Iraqi artists). In the Netherlands there are well over the one hundred artists from the Middle East, of which the majority exists of refugees from Iraq (about eighty). Yet most of these artists are not known to the vast majority of the Dutch cultural institutions and the general public.

Mohamed Abla (Egypt), Looking for a Leader, acrylic on canvas, 2006

In the present context of on the one hand the increased aversion to the Islamic world in many European countries, which often manifests itself  into populist political parties, or conspiracy theories about ‘Eurabia’ and, on the other hand, the very recent boom in the Arab world itself, it would be a great opportunity to make this art more visible to the rest of the world. The Middle East is in many respects a region with a lot of problems, but much is also considerably changing. The young people in Tunisia and Egypt and other Arab countries, who challenged their outdated dictatorships with blogs, facebook and twitter, have convincingly demonstrated this. Let us  have a look at the arts. There is much to discover.

Floris Schreve

Amsterdam, March, 2011

originally published in ‘Kunstbeeld’, nr. 4, 2011 (see here the original Dutch version). Also published on Global Arab Network and on Local/Global Art, my new blog on international art

Ahmed Mater (Saudi Arabia), Evolution of Man, Cairo Biennale, 2008. NB at the moment Mater is exhibiting in Amsterdam, at Willem Baars Project, Hoogte Kadijk 17, till the 30th of july. See http://www.baarsprojects.com/

Handout lecture ‘Modern and Contemporary art of the Arab World’

محاضرة الفن الحديث والمعاصر في العالم العربي

Diversity & Art,  Amsterdam, 17-5-2011, at the occasion of the exhibition of the Dutch Iraqi artist Qassim Alsaedy

Click on the pictures to enlarge

Short introduction on the history and geography of the modern Arab World

  • The Ottoman Empire
  • The  Sykes/Picot agreement
  • The formation of the national states
  • The Israeli/Palestinian conflict

  

                       

Ottoman Empire 1739                  Ottoman Empire 1914                   The Sykes/Picot agreement

              

The modern Middle East       The modern Arab World

                         

 Palestinian loss of land 1948-2000    The current situation (2005)

The early modernist pioneers:

            

Mahmud Mukhtar            Jewad Selim

             

Jewad Selim                    Faeq Hassan

Farid Belkahia

The ‘School of Sign’ (acc. Brahim Alaoui, curator of the  Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris):

                   

 Shakir Hassan al-Said               Ali Omar Ermes                              Rachid Koraichi

 

Other examples of ‘Arab Modernism’:

                   

  Mohamed Kacimi                           Dhia Azzawi                                   Rafik el-Kamel

The Palestinian Diaspora:

                        

Mona Hatoum                                    Laila Shawa                                       Emily Jacir

Recently emerged ‘international art’:

                                

 Walid Ra’ad/The Atlas Group           Mounir Fatmi                                     Ahmed Mater

Art and propaganda:

  • Iraq (monuments, Victory Arch, Babylon, portraits of Saddam Husayn and Michel Aflaq, the founder of the Ba’thparty)
  • Syria (portrait Havez al-Assad)
  • Libya (portrait Muammar al-Qadhafi)

      

Victory Arch                               ‘Saddam as Saladin’

                                                

Statue of Michel Aflaq                    Statue of Havez al-Assad                 Muammar al-Qadhafi

The art of the ‘Arab Spring’ in Egypt:

          

Mohamed Abla                                Ahmed Bassiony

  

Iraqi artists in the Diaspora:

 

              

Rafa al-Nasiri                             Hanaa Mal Allah                         Ali Assaf

          

Wafaa Bilal                           Halim al-Karim                         Nedim Kufi

                               

Hoshyar Rasheed                            Aras Kareem                          Ziad Haider

222012_218632921487529_100000224696132_1002776_6152992_n[1]

Qassim Alsaedy, Shortly after the War, mixed media (installation) Diversity&Art, May 2011 (see here an interview with Qassim Alsaedy at the opening-in Arabic)

Selected Bibliography

• Brahim Alaoui, Art Contemporain Arabe, Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris, 1996
• Brahim Alaoui, Mohamed Métalsi, Quatre Peintres Arabe Première ; Azzaoui, El Kamel, Kacimi, Marwan, Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris, 1988.
• Brahim Alaoui, Maria Lluïsa Borràs, Schilders uit de Maghreb (‘Painters of the Maghreb’), Centrum voor Beeldende Kunst, Gent (Belgium), 1994
• Brahim Alaoui, Laila Al Wahidi, Artistes Palestiniens Contemporains, Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris, 1997
• Wijdan Ali, Contemporary Art from the Islamic World, Al Saqi Books, London, 1989.
• Wijdan Ali, Modern Islamic Art; Development and continuity, University of Florida Press, 1997
• Hossein Amirsadeghi , Salwa Mikdadi, Nada Shabout, ao, New Vision; Arab Contemporary Art in the 21st Century, Thames and Hudson, London, 2009.
• Michael Archer, Guy Brett, Catherine de Zegher, Mona Hatoum, Phaidon Press, New York, 1997
• Ali Assaf, Mary Angela Shroth, Acqua Ferita/Wounded Water; Six Iraqi artists interpret the theme of water, Gangemi editore, Venice Biennale, 2011 (artists: Adel Abidin, Ahmed Alsoudani, Ali Assaf, Azad Nanakeli, Halim al-Karim, Walid Siti)
• Mouna Atassi, Contemporary Art in Syria, Damascus, 1998
• Wafaa Bilal (with Kari Lydersen), Shoot an Iraqi; Art, Life and Resistance Under the Gun, City Lights, New York, 2008
• Catherine David (ed),Tamass 2: Contemporary Arab Representations: Cairo, Witte De With Center For Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, 2005
• Saeb Eigner, Art of the Middle East; modern and contemporary art of the Arab World and Iran, Merrell, Londen/New York, 2010 (with an introduction of Zaha Hadid).
• Aida Eltori, Illuminations; Thirty days of running  in the Space: Ahmed Basiony (1978-2011) , Venice Biennale, 2011
• Maysaloun Faraj (ed.), Strokes of genius; contemporary Iraqi art, Saqi Books, London, 2002 (see here the presentation of the Strokes of Genius exhibition)
• Mounir Fatmi, Fuck the architect, published on the occasion of the Brussels Biennal, 2008
• Liliane Karnouk, Modern Egyptian Art; the emergence of a National Style, American University of Cairo Press, 1988, Cairo
• Samir Al Khalil (pseudonym of Kanan Makiya), The Monument; art, vulgarity and responsibillity in Iraq, Andre Deutsch, London, 1991
• Robert Kluijver, Borders; contemporary Middle Eastern art and discourse, Gemak, The Hague, October 2007/ January 2009
• Mohamed Metalsi, Croisement de Signe, Institut du Monde Arabe, Parijs, 1989 (on ao Shakir Hassan al-Said)
• Revue Noire; African Contemporary Art/Art Contemporain Africain: Morocco/Maroc, nr. 33-34, 2ème semestre, 1999, Paris.
• Ahmed Fouad Selim, 7th International Biennial of Cairo, Cairo, 1998.
• Ahmed Fouad Selim, 8th International Biennial of Cairo, Cairo, 2001.
• M. Sijelmassi, l’Art Contemporain au Maroc, ACR Edition, Paris, 1889.
• Walid Sadek, Tony Chakar, Bilal Khbeiz, Tamass 1; Beirut/Lebanon, Witte De With Center For Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, 2002
• Paul Sloman (ed.), with contributions of Wijdan Ali, Nat Muller, Lindsey Moore ao, Contemporary Art in the Middle East, Black Dog Publishing, London, 2009
• Stephen Stapleton (ed.), with contributions of Venetia Porter, Ashraf Fayadh, Aarnout Helb, ao, Ahmed Mater, Booth-Clibborn Productions, Abha/London 2010 (see also www.ahmedmater.com)
• Rayya El Zein & Alex Ortiz, Signs of the Times: the Popular Literature of Tahrir; Protest Signs, Graffiti, and Street Art, New York, 2011 (see http://arteeast.org/pages/literature/641/)

Links to relevant websites of institutions, manifestations, magazines, museums and galleries for Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa:

An Impression of the lecture, 17-5-2011, Diversity & Art, Amsterdam

250411_227750580575763_100000224696132_1090743_1100372_n[1]

On the screen a work of the Iraqi artist Rafa al-Nasiri

227124_227756883908466_100000224696132_1090811_4616731_n[1]

Three times Qassim Alsaedy’s Shortly after the War

249818_227760090574812_100000224696132_1090826_234673_n[1]

226447_227759537241534_100000224696132_1090824_2881093_n[1]

In front: The Iraqi/Kurdish journalist Goran Baba Ali and Herman Divendal, director of the Human Rights Organisation for Artists AIDA (Association Internationale des Défence des Artistes)

250668_227968957220592_100000224696132_1093175_6583121_n[1]

 

230902_227751083909046_100000224696132_1090753_6697931_n[1]

Me (left) with the Embassador of Iraq in the Netherlands, H.E. Dr. Saad Al-Ali, and Qassim Alsaedy

230452_227758637241624_100000224696132_1090820_7067089_n[1]

 

Floris Schreve
فلوريس سحرافا
(أمستردام، هولندا)

photos during the lecture by Hesam Hama

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Lezing ‘Moderne en hedendaagse kunst van de Arabische wereld’, 17 mei 2011

محاضرة الفن الحديث والمعاصر في العالم العربي

De Handout van mijn lezing van 17-5-2011, gehouden ter gelegenheid van de tentoonstelling van Qassim Alsaedy in Diversity & Art, met toevoeging van een selectie van de afbeeldingen, die ik in mijn lezing heb besproken (klik op afbeelding voor vergrote weergave). Verder heb ik bij de namen van de meeste individuele kunstenaars een link geplaatst naar hun persoonlijke website, of naar een achtergrondartikel dat voor die kunstenaar relevant is. Voor een introductie en een literatuuroverzicht verwijs ik naar mijn bijdrage in Kunstbeeld, ook op dit blog gepubliceerd

 

Lezing moderne en hedendaagse kunst uit de Arabische wereld

Diversity & Art, 17-5-2011

 

 

Korte inleiding geschiedenis en geografie van de moderne Arabische wereld

  • ·        Het Osmaanse Rijk
  • ·        Het Sykes/Picot accoord
  • ·        De vorming van de nationale staten
  • ·        Het Israëlisch/Palestijnse conflict

       

Vroege modernisten:

     

 

De ‘School van het teken’ (naar Brahim Alaoui):

  

 

Andere voorbeelden van ‘Arabisch modernisme’:

   

Kunst van de Palestijnse Diaspora:

   

Recent opgekomen ‘internationale kunst’:

  

 

Kunst en propaganda:

    • ·        Irak (monumenten, Victory Arch, Babylon, portretten van Saddam Husayn en Michel Aflaq)
    • ·        Syrië (portret Havez al-Assad)
    • ·        Libië (portret Muammar al-Qadhafi)

     

‘Kunst van de Arabische lente’ in Egypte:

  

Iraakse kunstenaars in de Diaspora:

  

       

  

 

Floris Schreve

17-5-2011

Enkele impressies van de lezing:

225904_226418040709017_100000224696132_1077819_258475_n[1]

Ikzelf pratend achter mijn laptop (powerpointpresentatie). Achter mij het werk van Qassim Alsaedy ‘Shortly after the War’. Zittend achter mij de Iraaks Koerdische journalist Goran Baba Ali

230902_227751073909047_100000224696132_1090750_7532071_n[1]

Tweede rij links ZE Dr. Saad Al-Ali, Ambassadeur van de Republiek Irak in Nederland. Naast hem Qassim Alsaedy.

225904_226418044042350_100000224696132_1077820_644736_n[1]

225904_226418047375683_100000224696132_1077821_1237958_n[1]

 

225904_226418050709016_100000224696132_1077822_1757261_n[1]

Een dia van de kaart van het delingsplan van het Midden Oosten door Engeland en Frankrijk, eind WO I

230902_227751070575714_100000224696132_1090749_8321007_n[1]

Qassim en ikzelf, voorafgaand aan de de lezing

250411_227750580575763_100000224696132_1090743_1100372_n[1]

Op het scherm een werk van de Iraakse kunstenaar Rafa al-Nasiri

250411_227750573909097_100000224696132_1090741_6294750_n[1]

227124_227756883908466_100000224696132_1090811_4616731_n[1]

drie keer Qassims installatie Shortly after the War (de slotdia)

225904_226418054042349_100000224696132_1077823_1846445_n[1]

 

230452_227758637241624_100000224696132_1090820_7067089_n[1]

Na afloop met de Iraakse ambassadeur, nog een diplomaat van de ambassade en Qassim Alsaedy

230902_227751077242380_100000224696132_1090751_8193033_n[1]

Qassim Alsaedy met de ambassadeur en twee andere diplomaten

226447_227759537241534_100000224696132_1090824_2881093_n[1]

Goran Baba Ali met Herman Divendal (AIDA)

249818_227760090574812_100000224696132_1090826_234673_n[1]

Rechtsvoor (achter Goran Baba Ali): Brigitte Reuter (die samen met Qassim het keramische werk maakte) en Peggie Breitbarth, die eerder de tentoonstelling van Persheng Warzandegan opende

250668_227968957220592_100000224696132_1093175_6583121_n[1]

 

230902_227751083909046_100000224696132_1090753_6697931_n[1]

Floris Schreve

فلوريس سحرافا

(أمستردام، هولندا)

Foto’s bij de lezing: Hesam Hama en Frank Schreve

var addthis_config = {“data_track_clickback”:true};

Hedendaagse kunst uit de Arabische wereld en Iran (verschenen als ingezonden stuk in Kunstbeeld, april 2011)

الفن المعاصر في العالم العربي وإيران

For the english version ‘Modern and contemporary art of the Middle East and North Africa’ click here

Tekst van mijn ingezonden stuk in Kunstbeeld van vorige maand, maar hier voorzien van beeldmateriaal en van een groot aantal links in de tekst, die verwijzen naar diverse sites van de kunstenaars, achtergrondartikelen of documentaires. Overigens geef ik op dinsdag 17 mei een lezing over precies dit onderwerp, in Diversity & Art, Sint Nicolaasstraat 21, Amsterdam, om 20.00bij de tentoonstelling van Qassim Alsaedy, zie  http://www.diversityandart.com/centre.htm (zie over de tentoonstelling het vorige artikel op dit blog). Onderstaande tekst kan ook als introductie dienen op wat ik daar veel uitgebreider aan de orde laat komen:

Wafaa Bilal (Iraq, US), from his project ’Domestic Tension’, 2007 (see for more http://wafaabilal.com/html/domesticTension.html )

Hedendaagse kunst uit het Midden Oosten verdient onze aandacht

(in Kunstbeeld, nr. 4, 2011)

Door de recente ontwikkelingen in Tunesië en Egypte en wellicht nog in andere Arabische landen, dringt nu tot de mainstream media door dat er ook in de Arabische wereld en Iran een verlangen naar vrijheid en democratie bestaat. Hoewel in de westerse wereld vaak teruggebracht tot essentialistische clichés, blijkt het beeld van de traditionele Arabier, of de fanatieke moslim vaak niet te kloppen. Het oriëntalistische paradigma, zoals Edward Said het in 1978 heeft omschreven, of zelfs de ‘neo-oriëntalistische’ variant (naar Salah Hassan), die we kennen sinds 9/11, inmiddels ook virulent aanwezig in de Nederlandse politiek, wordt door de beelden van de Arabische satellietzenders als Al Jazeera ontkracht. Er zijn wel degelijk progressieve en vrijheidslievende krachten in het Midden Oosten actief, zoals iedereen nu zelf kan zien.

Pas sinds de laatste jaren begint er steeds meer aandacht te komen voor de hedendaagse kunst uit die regio. Kunstenaars als Mona Hatoum (Palestina), Shirin Neshat (Iran) en de architecte Zaha Hadid (Irak) waren al iets langer zichtbaar in de internationale kunstcircuits. Sinds de afgelopen vijf à tien jaar zijn daar een aantal namen bijgekomen, zoals Ghada Amer (Egypte), Akram Zaatari en Walid Ra’ad (Libanon), Emily Jacir (VS/Palestina) en Fareed Armaly (VS/Palestijns-Libanese ouders), Mounir Fatmi (Marokko), Farhad Mosheri (Iran), Ahmed Mater (Saudi Arabië), Mohammed al-Shammerey en Wafaa Bilal (Irak). Het gaat hier overigens vooral om kunstenaars die tegenwoordig in de westerse wereld wonen en werken.

Afbeelding49

Walid Ra’ad/The Atlas Group (Lebanon), see http://www.theatlasgroup.org/index.html, at Documenta 11, Kassel, 2002

Mounir Fatmi (Morocco), The Connections, installation, 2003 – 2009, see http://www.mounirfatmi.com/2installation/connexions01.html

Toch is het verschijnsel ‘moderne of hedendaagse kunst’ in het Midden Oosten niet iets van de laatste decennia. Vanaf het eind van de Eerste Wereldoorlog, toen de meeste Arabische landen in de huidige vorm ontstonden, trachtten kunstenaars in diverse landen een eigen vorm van het internationale modernisme te creëren. Belangrijke pioniers waren Mahmud Mukhtar (vanaf de jaren twintig in Egypte), Jewad Selim (jaren veertig en vijftig in Irak), of Mohammed Melehi en Farid Belkahia (vanaf de jaren zestig in Marokko). Deze kunstenaars waren de eerste lichting die, na veelal in het westen waren opgeleid, het modernisme in hun geboorteland introduceerden. Sinds die tijd zijn er in de diverse Arabische landen diverse locale kunsttradities ontstaan, waarbij kunstenaars inspiratie putten uit zowel het internationale modernisme, als uit tradities van de eigen cultuur.

Shakir Hassan al-Said (Iraq), Objective Contemplations, oil on board, 1984, see http://universes-in-universe.org/eng/nafas/articles/2008/shakir_hassan_al_said/photos/08

Ali Omar Ermes (Lybia/UK), Fa, Ink and acryl on paper

Dat laatste was overigens niet iets vrijblijvends. In het dekolonisatieproces namen de kunstenaars vaak expliciet stelling tegen de koloniale machthebber. Het opvoeren van locale tradities was hier veelal een strategie voor. Ook gingen, vanaf eind jaren zestig, andere elementen een rol spelen. ‘Pan-Arabisme’ of zelfs het zoeken naar een ‘Pan-islamitische identiteit’ had zijn weerslag op de kunsten. Dit is duidelijk te zien aan wat de Frans Marokkaanse kunsthistoricus Brahim Alaoui ‘l’ Ecole de Signe’ noemde, de school van het teken. De van zichzelf al abstracte kalligrafische en decoratieve traditie van de islamitische kunst, werd in veel verschillende varianten gecombineerd met eigentijdse abstracte kunst. De belangrijkste representanten van deze unieke ‘stroming’ binnen de moderne islamitische kunst waren Shakir Hassan al-Said (Irak, overleden in 2004), of de nog altijd zeer actieve kunstenaars Rachid Koraichi (Algerije, woont en werkt in Frankrijk), Ali Omar Ermes (Libië, woont en werkt in Engeland) en Wijdan Ali (Jordanië).

Laila Shawa (Palestine), Gun for Palestine (from ‘The Walls of Gaza’), silkscreen on canvas, 1995

Wat wel bijzonder problematisch is geweest voor de ontwikkeling van de eigentijdse kunst van het Midden Oosten, zijn de grote crises van de laatste decennia. De dictatoriale regimes, de vele oorlogen of, in het geval van Palestina, de bezetting door Israël, hebben de kunsten vaak danig in de weg gezeten. Als de kunsten werden gestimuleerd, dan was dat vaak voor propagandadoeleinden, met Irak als meest extreme voorbeeld (de vele portretten en standbeelden van Saddam Hussein spreken voor zich). Vele kunstenaars zagen zich dan ook genoodzaakt om uit te wijken in de diaspora (dit geldt vooral voor Palestijnse en Iraakse kunstenaars). In Nederland wonen er ruim boven de honderd kunstenaars uit het Midden Oosten, waarvan de grootste groep uit vluchtelingen uit Irak bestaat (ongeveer tachtig). Toch is het merendeel van deze kunstenaars niet bekend bij de diverse Nederlandse culturele instellingen.

Mohamed Abla (Egypt), Looking for a Leader, acrylic on canvas, 2006

In de huidige constellatie van enerzijds de toegenomen afkeer van de islamitische wereld in veel Europese landen, die zich veelal vertaalt in populistische politieke partijen, of in samenzweringstheorieën over ‘Eurabië’ en anderzijds de zeer recente stormachtige ontwikkelingen in de Arabische wereld zelf, zou het een prachtkans zijn om deze kunst meer zichtbaar te maken. Het Midden Oosten is in veel opzichten een ‘probleemgebied’, maar er is ook veel in beweging. De jongeren in Tunesië, Egypte en wellicht andere Arabische landen, die met blogs, facebook en twitter hun vermolmde dictaturen de baas waren, hebben dit zonder meer aangetoond. Laat ons zeker een blik de kunsten werpen. Er valt veel te ontdekken.

Floris Schreve

Amsterdam, februari 2011

Ahmed Mater (Saoedi Arabië), Evolution of Man, Cairo Biënnale, 2008. NB at the moment Mater is exhibiting in Amsterdam, at Willem Baars Project, Hoogte Kadijk 17, till the 30th of july. See http://www.baarsprojects.com/

Tot zover mijn bijdrage in Kunstbeeld. Ik wil hieronder nog een klein literatuuroverzichtje geven van een paar basiswerken, die er in de afgelopen jaren verschenen zijn.

• Brahim Alaoui, Art Contemporain Arabe, Institut du Monde Arabe, Parijs, 1996
• Brahim Alaoui, Mohamed Métalsi, Quatre Peintres Arabe Première ; Azzaoui, El Kamel, Kacimi, Marwan, Institut du Monde Arabe, Parijs, 1988.
• Brahim Alaoui, Maria Lluïsa Borràs, Schilders uit de Maghreb, Centrum voor Beeldende Kunst, Gent, 1994
• Brahim Alaoui, Laila Al Wahidi, Artistes Palestiniens Contemporains, Institut du Monde Arabe, Parijs, 1997
• Wijdan Ali, Contemporary Art from the Islamic World, Al Saqi Books, Londen, 1989.
• Wijdan Ali, Modern Islamic Art; Development and continuity, University of Florida Press, 1997
• Hossein Amirsadeghi , Salwa Mikdadi, Nada Shabout, ao, New Vision; Arab Contemporary Art in the 21st Century, Thames and Hudson, Londen, 2009.
• Michael Archer, Guy Brett, Catherine de Zegher, Mona Hatoum, Phaidon Press, New York, 1997
• Mouna Atassi, Contemporary Art in Syria, Damascus, 1998
• Wafaa Bilal (met Kari Lydersen), Shoot an Iraqi; Art, Life and Resistance Under the Gun, City Lights, New York, 2008 (zie hier ook een voordracht van Wafaa Bilal over zijn boek en project)
• Catherine David (ed),Tamass 2: Contemporary Arab Representations: Cairo, Witte De With Center For Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, 2005
• Saeb Eigner, Art of the Middle East; modern and contemporary art of the Arab World and Iran, Merrell, Londen/New York, 2010 (met een voorwoord van de beroemde Iraakse architecte Zaha Hadid).
• Maysaloun Faraj (ed.), Strokes of genius; contemporary Iraqi art, Saqi Books, Londen, 2002 (zie hier een presentatie van de Strokes of Genius exhibition)
• Mounir Fatmi, Fuck the architect, published on the occasion of the Brussels Biennal, 2008
• Jabra Ibrahim Jabra, Grassroots of the Modern Iraqi Art, al Dar al Arabiya, Bagdad, 1986.
• Liliane Karnouk, Modern Egyptian Art; the emergence of a National Style, American University of Cairo Press, 1988, Cairo
• Samir Al Khalil (pseudoniem van Kanan Makiya), The Monument; art, vulgarity and responsibillity in Iraq, Andre Deutsch, Londen, 1991
• Robert Kluijver, Borders; contemporary Middle Eastern art and discourse, Gemak, The Hague, October 2007/ January 2009
• Mohamed Metalsi, Croisement de Signe, Institut du Monde Arabe, Parijs, 1989 (over oa Shakir Hassan al-Said)
Revue Noire; African Contemporary Art/Art Contemporain Africain: Morocco/Maroc, nr. 33-34, 2ème semestre, 1999, Parijs (uitgebreid themanummer over Marokko).
• Ahmed Fouad Selim, 7th International Biennial of Cairo, Cairo, 1998.
• Ahmed Fouad Selim, 8th International Biennial of Cairo, Cairo, 2001.
• M. Sijelmassi, l’Art Contemporain au Maroc, ACR Edition, Parijs, 1889.
• Walid Sadek, Tony Chakar, Bilal Khbeiz, Tamass 1; Beirut/Lebanon, Witte De With Center For Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, 2002
• Paul Sloman (ed.), met bijdragen van  Wijdan Ali, Nat Muller, Lindsey Moore ea, Contemporary Art in the Middle East, Black Dog Publishing, Londen, 2009
• Stephen Stapleton (red.), met bijdragen van Venetia Porter, Ashraf Fayadh, Aarnout Helb, ea, Ahmed Mater, Booth-Clibborn Productions, Abha/Londen 2010 (zie ook www.ahmedmater.com)
• Rayya El Zein & Alex Ortiz, Signs of the Times: the Popular Literature of Tahrir; Protest Signs, Graffiti, and Street Art, New York, 2011 (see http://arteeast.org/pages/literature/641/

Verder nog een aantal links naar relevante websites van kunstinstellingen, manifestaties, tijdschriften, musea en galleries voor hedendaagse kunst uit het Midden Oosten:

Mijn eigen bijdragen (of waar ik mede een bijdrage aan heb geleverd) elders op het web

Op dit blog:

Iraakse kunstenaars in ballingschap

Drie kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld

Ziad Haider (begeleidende tekst
tentoonstelling)

Qassim Alsaedy (begeleidende tekst tentoonstelling)

Interview met de Iraakse kunstenaar Qassim Alsaedy

Hoshyar Saeed Rasheed (begeleidende tekst tentoonstelling)

Aras Kareem (begeleidende tekst tentoonstelling)

links naar artikelen en uitzendingen over kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld

De terugkeer van Irak naar de Biënnale van Venetië

Nedim Kufi en Ahmed Mater; twee bijzondere kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld nu in Amsterdam

Kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld in Nederland (Eutopia, 2011)

Zie ook mijn nieuwe Engelstalige blog over oa hedendaagse kunst uit de Arabische wereld On Global/Local Art

Tentoonstelling Diversity & Art- Qassim Alsaedy (Bagdad 1949) قاسم الساعدي

 

قاسم الساعدي 

Qassim Alsaedy – ‘Shortly after the War’

Qassim Alsaedy werd in 1949 geboren in Bagdad. Zijn familie kwam oorspronkelijk uit de zuidelijke stad al-Amara, maar was, zoals zo velen in die tijd, naar de hoofdstad vetrokken. Het gezin had zich gevestigd in een huis vlak naast de Jumhuriyya Brug over de Tigris, niet ver van het Plein van de Onafhankelijkheid. Voor Alsaedy’s keuze voor het kunstenaarschap was dit gegeven zeker van belang. Na de revolutie van 1958, toen de door de Britten gesteunde monarchie van de troon werd gestoten, werd er op dit plein een begin gemaakt aan de bouw het beroemde vrijheidsmonument (Nasb al-Huriyya) van Iraks bekendste beeldhouwer Jewad Selim, die tegenwoordig veelal wordt gezien als de belangrijkste grondlegger van de modernistische kunst van Irak. Dit werk, dat in 1962 na de dood van Selim voltooid werd, maakte een grote indruk op Alsaedy. Het vrijheidsmonument van Jewad Selim deed Alsaedy voor het eerst beseffen dat kunst niet alleen mooi hoeft te zijn, maar ook werkelijk iets te betekenen kan hebben.

Ook een expositie van de beroemde Iraakse kunstenaar Shakir Hassan al-Said in het Kolbankian Museum in Bagdad in 1962, maakte grote indruk. Alsaedy besloot om zelf kunstenaar te worden. In 1969 deed hij zijn toelatingsexamen aan de kunstacademie van Bagdad, bij Shakir Hassan al-Said, die uiteindelijk een van zijn belangrijkste docenten zou worden in de tweede fase van zijn opleiding.

In de tijd dat Alsaedy zich inschreef aan de kunstacademie had Irak een roerige periode achter de rug en waren de vooruitzichten bijzonder grimmig. In 1963 had een kleine maar fanatieke nationalistische en autoritaire groepering, de Ba’thpartij, kortstondig de macht gegrepen. In de paar maanden dat deze partij aan de macht was, richtte zij een ware slachting aan onder alle mogelijke opponenten. Omdat de Ba’thi’s zo te keer gingen had het leger nog in datzelfde jaar ingegrepen en de Ba’thpartij weer uit de macht gezet. Tot 1968 werd Irak bestuurd door het autoritaire en militaire bewind van de gebroeders Arif, dat wel voor enige stabiliteit zorgde en geleidelijk steeds meer vrijheden toestond. In 1968 wist de Ba’thpartij echter weer de macht te grijpen, deze keer met meer succes. Het bewind zou aan de macht blijven tot 2003, toen een Amerikaanse invasiemacht  Saddam Husayn (president vanaf 1979) van de troon stootte. Toch opereerde de Ba’thpartij aan het begin van de jaren zeventig voorzichtiger dan in 1963 en dan zij later in de jaren zeventig zou doen. In eerste instantie werd het kunstonderwijs met rust gelaten, hoewel daar, precies in de periode dat Alsaedy studeerde, daar geleidelijk aan verandering in kwam.

        

Links: Qassim Alsaedy met Faiq Hassan (links), begin jaren zeventig
Rechts: Qassim Alsaedy met de kunstenaar Kadhim Haydar, ook een van zijn docenten, begin jaren zeventig (foto’s collectie Qassim Alsaedy)

Zover was het nog niet in 1969. Vanaf de jaren veertig was er in Irak een bloeiende avant-garde beweging ontstaan, vooral geïnitieerd door Jewad Selim en de Bagdadgroep voor Eigentijdse Kunst. Naast de groep rond Jewad Selim was er ook Faiq Hassan (Alsaedy’s belangrijkste docent in zijn eerste jaar) en Mahmud Sabri, wiens radicale avant-gardistische opvattingen zo slecht in de smaak vielen bij de Ba’thpartij, dat hij bijna uit de geschiedschrijving van de Iraakse moderne kunst is verdwenen. Toch waren juist de ideeën van Sabri, die al in de vroege jaren zeventig in ballingschap ging en zich uiteindelijk in Praag vestigde,  van groot belang voor Alsaedy’s visie op zijn kunstenaarschap. Van Sabri, die een geheel nieuw artistiek concept had ontwikkeld, het zogenaamde Quantum Realisme,leerde Alsaedy dat de kunstenaar de kunstenaar vooral een verschil kan maken door geheel vrij en onafhankelijk te zijn van welke stroming, ideologie of gedachtegoed dan ook, iets  wat hij in zijn verdere loopbaan altijd zou proberen na te streven.

Een andere belangrijke docent van Alsaedy was Shakir Hassan al-Said, een van de beroemdste kunstenaars van Irak en zelfs van de Arabische wereld. Al-Said bracht Alsaedy ook in contact met Jabra Ibrahim Jabra, de beroemde schrijver en kunstcriticus van Palestijnse afkomst, in die dagen een van de belangrijkste figuren binnen de Iraakse kunstscene. Maar verder was de invloed van Shakir Hassan van groot belang op Alsaedy’s artistieke vorming.  Na een expressionistische periode had Shakir Hassan al Said een zeer persoonlijke abstracte beeldtaal ontwikkeld, waarbij het Arabische alfabet als basis diende. Ook had al-Said een uitgebreide theorie ontwikkeld, die hij voor zijn werk als uitgangspunt nam. Hijzelf en een aantal geestverwanten vormden de zogenaamde One Dimension Group. Hoewel er misschien iets van een oppervlakkige verwantschap is tussen het werk van Shakir Hassan al-Said en dat van Alsaedy – ook al-Said liet zich vaak inspireren door opschriften op muren en ook veel van zijn werken hebben titels als Writings on a Wall zijn er ook wezenlijke verschillen. Al-Said en zijn geestverwanten putten vooral inspiratie uit de abstracte islamitische traditie, waarbij zij vooral het Arabisch schrift als uitgangspunt namen. De bronnen van Alsaedy hebben veelal een andere oorsprong, die niet in de laatste plaats samenhangen met een van de meest indringende ervaringen van leven.

Qassim Alsaedy, Rhythms in White, assemblage van dobbelstenen, 1999

Halverwege Alsaedy’s tijd aan de academie werd de controle van de Ba’thpartij, die nog maar net aan de macht was, steeds sterker. Het regime begon zich ook met het kunstonderwijs te bemoeien. Op een geven moment werd Alsaedy, samen met een paar anderen, uitgenodigd door een paar functionarissen van het regime. In 2000 beschreef Alsaedy deze bijeenkomst als volgt: ‘We were invited for a meeting to drink some tea and to talk. They told us they liked to exhibit our works, in a good museum, with a good catalogue and they promised all these works would be sold, for the prize we asked.  It seemed that the heaven was open for us. But then they came with their conditions. We had to work according the official ideology  and they should give us specific titles. We refused their offer, because we were artists who were faithful towards our own responsibility: making good and honest art. When we agreed we would sold ourselves. (..) Later they found some very cheap artists who were willing to sell themselves to the regime and they joined them. All their paintings had been sold and the prizes were high. One of them, I knew him very well, he bought a new villa and a new car. And in this way they took all the works of these bad artists, and showed them and said: “Well, this is from the party and these are  the artists of Iraq”. The others were put in the margins of the cultural life’ (uit mijn Interview met Qassim Alsaedy, 8-8-2000).

Qassim Alsaedy, Saltwall, olieverf op doek, 2005

Alsaedy benadrukt dat bijna zijn hele generatie ‘nee’ heeft gezegd tegen het regime, waarvoor velen een hoge prijs hebben moeten betalen. Alsaedy spreekt dan ook van ‘the lost generation’, waarmee hij specifiek de lichting kunstenaars van de jaren zeventig bedoelt. De kunstenaars van voor die tijd hadden al een carrière voordat het regime zich met de kunsten ging bemoeien en de latere generatie had te maken met kunstinstituties die al geheel waren geïncorporeerd in het staatsapparaat. De problemen waarmee die kunstenaars te maken kregen waren natuurlijk minstens net zo groot, maar van een andere aard, dan de lichting kunstenaars die gevormd werd gedurende de periode van transitie. De generatie van de jaren zeventig zag en ervoer hoe de kunstscene langzaam werd ‘geba’thificeerd’.

Ook was Alsaedy lid van een verboden studentenbond. Dit alles leidde uiteindelijk tot zijn arrestatie. Op een gegeven moment werd Alsaedy midden op de dag opgepakt en afgevoerd naar de meest beruchte gevangenis van Irak van dat moment, al-Qasr al-Nihayyah, ‘het Paleis van het Einde’. Dit was het voormalige Koninklijke Paleis dat in de jaren zeventig door het regime als gevangenis was ingericht, totdat in de jaren tachtig de inmiddels algemeen bekende en beruchte Abu Ghraib open ging.

Voor negen maanden ging Alsaedy door de meest intensieve periode van zijn leven. Martelingen en de permanente dreiging van executie waren aan de orde van de dag. Gedurende de negen maanden dat hij zich hier bevond werd Alsaedy teruggeworpen tot zijn meest elementaire bestaan. Zijn omgeving was gereduceerd tot de gevangenismuren. Daar kwam Alsaedy tot een belangrijk inzicht. Hij ontdekte dat de velen die voor hem zich in deze ruimte hadden bevonden kleine sporen van hun bestaan hadden achtergelaten. Op de muren waren ingekraste tekeningen of opschriften zichtbaar, meestal nog maar vaag zichtbaar.  Alsaedy kwam tot het besef dat deze tekeningen van de gevangenen de laatste strohalm betekenden om mens te blijven. Zelfs in de donkerste omstandigheden trachtten mensen op de been te blijven door zich te uiten in primitief gemaakte tekeningen of om hun getuigenissen op de muren te krassen. Dit inzicht zou allesbepalend zijn voor Alsaedy’s verdere kunstenaarschap. Het thema ‘krassen of tekens op muren’, de rode draad in zijn hele oeuvre, vond hier zijn oorsprong.

Na deze negen maanden werd Alsaedy, middels een onverwachte amnestieafkondiging, samen met een groep andere gevangenen weer vrijgelaten. Een succesvol bestaan als kunstenaar via de gevestigde kanalen in Irak zat er voor hem niet meer in. Alsaedy werd definitief als verdacht bestempeld en was bij het regime uit de gratie geraakt. Hij besloot zijn heil elders te zoeken en week in 1979 uit naar Libanon. Daar participeerde hij samen met andere uitgeweken Iraakse kunstenaars aan een tentoonstelling die  mede een aanklacht was tegen het regime van de Ba’thpartij in Irak.

De onrustige situatie in het Midden Oosten maakte dat Qassim Alsaedy als Iraakse balling altijd op de vlucht moest, om te proberen elders een (tijdelijk) veilig heenkomen te zoeken. Door de burgeroorlog was Libanon een allerminst veilige plek en bovendien voltrokken zich ook nieuwe ontwikkelingen in Irak. Saddam Husayn was inmiddels president geworden en had alle oppositie, zelfs binnen zijn eigen partij, geëlimineerd. Vervolgens had hij zijn land in een bloedige oorlog met Iran gestort. Hoewel de Ba’thpartij met straffe hand het land controleerde, was er in het Koerdische noorden een soort schemergebied ontstaan, waar veel Iraakse oppositiekrachten naar waren uitgeweken. Door de chaotische frontlinies van de oorlog en doordat de Koerden, beter dan welke andere groepering in Irak, zich hadden georganiseerd in verzetsgroepen, was dit een gebied een soort vrijhaven geworden. Alsaedy kwam in 1982 terecht in de buurt van Dohuk, in westelijk Koerdistan en sloot zich, samen met andere Iraakse ‘politiek ontheemden’, aan bij de Peshmerga, de Koerdische verzetsstrijders. Naast dat hij zich bij het verzet had aangesloten was hij ook actief als kunstenaar. Naar aanleiding van deze ervaringen maakte hij later een serie werken, die bedekt zijn met een zwarte laag, maar waarvan de onderliggende gekleurde lagen sporadisch zichtbaar zijn door de diepe krassen die hij in zijn schilderijen had aangebracht.

Qassim Alsaedy, Black Field, olieverf op doek, 1999

Alsaedy over deze werken (zie bovenstaande afbeelding): ‘In Kurdistan I joined the movement which was against the regime. I worked there also as an artist. I exhibited there and made an exhibition in a tent for all these people in the villages, but anyhow, the most striking was the Iraqi regime used a very special policy against Kurdistan, against this area and also against other places in Iraq. They burned and sacrificed the fields by enormous bombings. So you see, and I saw it by myself, huge fields became totally black. The houses, trees, grass, everything was black. But look, when you see the burned grass, late in the season, you could see some little green points, because the life and the beauty is stronger than the evil. The life was coming through. So you saw black, but there was some green coming up. For example I show you this painting which is extremely black, but it is to deep in my heart. Maybe you can see it hardly but when you look very sensitive you see some little traces of life. You see the life is still there. It shines through the blackness. The life is coming back’ (geciteerd uit mijn interview met Alsaedy uit 2000).

Een impressie uit Alsaedy’s atelier, februari 2011

Gedurende bijna de hele oorlog met Iran verbleef Alsaedy in Koerdistan. Aan het eind van de oorlog, in 1988, lanceerde het Iraakse regime de operatie al-Anfal, de grootschalige zuivering van het Koerdische platteland en de bombardementen met chemische wapens op diverse Koerdische steden en dorpen, waarvan die op Halabja het meest berucht is geworden. Voor Alsaedy was het in Irak definitief te gevaarlijk geworden en moest hij zijn heil elders zoeken.

Het werd uiteindelijk Libië. Alsaedy: ‘I moved to Libya because I had no any choice to go to some other place in the world. I couldn’t go for any other place, because I couldn’t have a visa. It was the only country in the world I could go. Maybe it was a sort of destiny. I lived there for seven years. After two years the Kuwait war broke out in Iraq followed by the embargo and all the punishments. In this time it was impossible for a citizen of Iraq to have a visa for any country in the world’ (uit interview met Qassim Alsaedy, 2000).

Hoe vreemd het in de context van nu ook mag klinken, gedurende die tijd leefde Muammar al-Qadhafi in onmin met zo’n beetje alle Arabische leiders, inclusief Saddam Husayn. Het was precies op dat moment in de grillige loopbaan van de Libische dictator, dat hij zijn deuren opende voor alle mogelijke dissidenten van diverse pluimage uit de hele Arabische wereld. Ook Alsaedy kon daar zijn heenkomen zoeken en hij kreeg bovendien een betrekking als docent aan de kunstacademie van Tripoli.

   

   

Qassim Alsaedy werkt met zijn studenten in Tripoli aan een speciaal muurschilderingenproject, in 1989 en in 1994 (foto’s collectie Qassim Alsaedy)- klik op afbeelding voor vergrote weergave

In Libië voerde hij ook een groot muurschilderingenproject uit. Tegen zijn eigen verwachting in kreeg hij toestemming voor zijn plannen. Alsaedy: ‘I worked as a teacher on the academy of Tripoli, but the most interesting thing I did there was making many huge wallpaintings. The impossible happened when the city counsel of Tripoli supported me to execute this project. I had always the dream how to make the city as beautiful as possible. I was thinking about Bagdad when I made it. My old dream was to do something like that in Bagdad, but it was always impossible to do that, because of the regime. I believe all the people in the world have the right on freedom, on water, on sun, on air, but also the right on beauty. They have the right on beauty in the world, or in their lives. So one of my aims was to make wallpaintings and I worked hard on it. They were abstract paintings, but I tried to give them something of the atmosphere of the city. It is an Arabic, Islamic city with Italian elements. I tried to make something new when I studied the Islamic architecture. I worked on them with my students and so something very unusual happened, especially for the girls, because in our society it is not very usual to see the girls painting on the street. It was a kind of a shock, but in a nice way. It brought something positive’ (interview met Qassim Alsaedy, 2000).

Toch was ook Libië een politiestaat en zat het gevaar in een klein hoekje. De functionaris van het Libische regime, onder wiens verantwoordelijkheid Alsaedy’s project viel, vond een oranjekleurige zon in een van Alsaedy’s muurschilderingen verdacht. Volgens hem was deze zon eigenlijk rood en zou het gaan om verkapte communistische propaganda (zie bovenstaande afbeeldingen, rechtsonder). Alsaedy werd te kennen gegeven dat hij de zon groen moest schilderen, de kleur van de ‘officiële ideologie’ van het Qadhafi-bewind (zie het beruchte en inmiddels ook hier bekende ‘Groene Boekje’). Alsaedy weigerde dit en werd meteen ontslagen.

Zijn ontslag betekende ook dat Alsaedy’s verblijf in Libië een riskante aangelegenheid was geworden. Hij exposeerde nog wel in het Franse Culturele Instituut, maar had alle reden om zich niet meer veilig te voelen. Hij besloot dat het beter was om met zijn gezin zo snel mogelijk naar Europa te verdwijnen. Uiteindelijk kwam hij in 1994 aan in Nederland.

Vanaf eind jaren negentig, toen Alsaedy na een turbulent leven met vele omzwervingen ook de rust had gevonden om aan zijn oeuvre te bouwen, begon hij langzaam maar zeker zichtbaar te worden in de Nederlandse kunstcircuits. Zijn eerste tentoonstellingen waren vaak samen met zijn ook uit Irak afkomstige vriend Ziad Haider (zie deze eerdere expositie). Met een viertal andere uit Irak afkomstige kunstenaars (waaronder ook Hoshyar Rasheed, zie deze eerdere expositie) exposeerde hij in 1999 in Museum Rijswijk, zijn eerste museale tentoonstelling in Nederland.

In die periode werd de centrale thematiek van Alsaedy’s werk steeds meer zichtbaar. Voor Qassim Alsaedy staan de sporen die de mens in de loop der geschiedenis achterlaat centraal, van de vroegste oudheid (bijvoorbeeld Mesopotamië) tot het recente verleden (zie zijn ervaring in de gevangenis, of de zwarte laag in zijn ‘Koerdische landschappen’).

In 2000 formuleerde hij zijn centrale concept als volgt: ‘When I lived in Baghdad I travelled very often to Babylon or other places, which were not to far from  Baghdad. It is interesting to see how people reuse the elements of the ancient civilizations. For example, my mother had an amulet of cylinder formed limestones. She wore this amulet her whole lifetime, especially using it when she had, for example a headache. Later I asked her: “Let me see, what kind of stones are these?” Then I discovered something amazing. These cylinder stones, rolling them on the clay, left some traces like the ancient writings on the clay tablets. There was some text and there were some drawings. It suddenly looked very familiar. I asked her: “what is this, how did you get these stones?” She told me that she got it from her mother, who got it from her mother, etc. So you see, there is a strong connection with the human past, not only in the museum, but even in your own house. When you visit Babylon you find the same traces of these stones. So history didn’t end.

In my home country it is sometimes very windy. When the wind blows the air is filled with dust. Sometimes it can be very dusty you can see nothing. Factually this is the dust of Babylon, Ninive, Assur, the first civilizations. This is the dust you breath, you have it on your body, your clothes, it is in your memory, blood, it is everywhere, because the Iraqi civilizations had been made of clay. We are a country of rivers, not of stones. The dust you breath it belongs to something. It belongs to houses, to people or to some clay tablets. I feel it in this way; the ancient civilizations didn’t end. The clay is an important condition of making life. It is used by people and then it becomes dust, which falls in the water, to change again in thick clay. There is a permanent circle of water, clay, dust, etc. It is how life is going on and on.

I have these elements in me. I use them not because I am homesick, or to cry for my beloved country. No it is more than this. I feel the place and I feel the meaning of the place. I feel the voices and the spirits in those dust, clay, walls and air. In this atmosphere I can find a lot of elements which I can reuse or recycle. You can find these things in my work; some letters, some shadows, some voices or some traces of people. On every wall you can find traces. The wall is always a sign of human life’ (interview met Qassim Alsaedy, 2000).

Qassim Alsaedy, Rhythms, spijkers op hout, 1998

 

Qassim Alsaedy, uit de serie Faces of Baghdad, assemblage van metaal en lege patroonhulzen op paneel, 2005 (geëxposeerd op de Biënnale van Florence van 2005)

Een opvallend element in Alsaedy’s werk is het gebruik van spijkers. Ook op deze tentoonstelling zijn daar een aantal voorbeelden van te zien. Over een ander werk, een assemblage van spijkers in een verschillende staat van verroesting zei Alsaedy (voor een documentaire van de Ikon uit 2003) het volgende: ‘Dit heb ik gemaakt om iets over de pijn te vertellen. Wanneer de spijkers wegroesten zullen zij uiteindelijk verdwijnen. Er blijven dan alleen nog maar een paar gaatjes over. En een paar kruisjes’ (uit Beeldenstorm, ‘Factor’, Ikon, 17 juni 2003).

Een zelfde soort element zijn de patroonhulzen, die vaak terugkeren in Alsaedy’s werk, ook op deze tentoonstelling. Ook deze zullen uiteindelijk vergaan en slechts een litteken achterlaten.

In een eerder verband heb ik Alsaedy’s werk weleens vergeleken met dat van Armando (bijv.  in ISIM Newsletter 13, december 2003). Beiden raken dezelfde thematiek. Toch zijn er ook belangrijke verschillen. In zijn ‘Schuldige Landschappen’ geeft Armando uitdrukking aan het idee dat er op een plaats waar zich een dramatische gebeurtenis heeft afgespeeld (Armando verwijst vaak naar de concentratiekampen van de Nazi’s) er altijd iets zal blijven hangen, al zijn alle sporen uitgewist. Alsaedy gaat van hetzelfde uit, maar legt toch een ander accent. In zijn zwarte werken en met zijn gebruik van spijkers en patroonhulzen  benadrukt Alsaedy juist dat de tijd uiteindelijk alle wonden heelt, al zal er wel een spoor achterblijven.

Qassim Alsaedy (ism Brigitte Reuter), Who said no?, installatie Flehite Museum, Amersfoort, 2006

Sinds de laatste tien jaar duikt er in het werk van Alsaedy steeds vaker een crucifix op. Ook op deze tentoonstelling is daar een voorbeeld van te zien. Dat is opmerkelijk, omdat de kunstenaar geen Christelijke achtergrond heeft en ook niet Christelijk is. Alsaedy heeft het verhaal van Jezus echter ontdaan van zijn religieuze elementen.  Duidelijk bracht hij dit tot uitdrukking in zijn installatie in het Flehite Museum in Amersfoort, getiteld ‘Who said No?’ Los van de religieuze betekenis, is Jezus voor Alsaedy het ultieme voorbeeld van iemand die duidelijk ‘Nee’ heeft gezegd tegen de onderdrukking en daar weliswaar een hoge prijs voor heeft betaald, maar uiteindelijk gewonnen heeft. Op de manier zoals Alsaedy de crucifix heeft verwerkt is het een herkenbaar symbool geworden tegen dictatuur in welke vorm dan ook.

Detail ‘tegelvloer’ van Qassim Alsaedy en Brigitte Reuter

Gedurende de afgelopen tien jaar heeft Alsaedy veel samengewerkt met de ceramiste Brigitte Reuter. Ook op deze tentoonstelling zijn een aantal van hun gezamenlijke werken geëxposeerd. Gezien Alsaedy’s fascinatie voor het materiaal (zie zijn eerdere opmerkingen over de beschavingen uit de oudheid van Irak) was dit een logische keuze. De objecten zijn veelal door Reuter gecreëerd en door Alsaedy van reliëf voorzien, vaak een zelfde soort tekens die hij in zijn schilderijen heeft verwerkt. Door de klei te bakken, weer te bewerken of te glazuren en weer opnieuw te bakken, ontstaat er een zelfde soort gelaagdheid die ook in zijn andere werken is te zien. Een hoogtepunt van hun samenwerking was een installatie in het Rijksmuseum voor Oudheden in Leiden in 2008. In het Egyptische tempeltje van Taffeh, dat daar in de centrale hal staat, legden zij een vloer aan van gebakken en bewerkte stenen. Maar ook eerder, in het Flehite Museum, waren veel van hun gezamenlijke ‘vloeren’ en objecten te zien.

1287803366_6_BDNC[1]

1287993798_6_aF3h[1]

 

 

Uit Book of Time, gemengde technieken op papier, 2001 (detail)

Een ander interessant onderdeel van Alsaedy’s oeuvre zijn zijn tekeningenboekjes. Op deze tentoonstelling is daar een van te bezichtigen,  Book of Time, uit 2001. Pagina na pagina heeft hij, als het ware laag over laag, verschillende tekens aangebracht met verschillende technieken (pentekening, inkt, aquarel en collage). Ook hier is zijn kenmerkende ‘tekenschrift’ zeer herkenbaar.

In 2003 werd het Ba’thregime van Saddam Husayn door een Amerikaanse invasiemacht ten val gebracht. Net als op alle in ballingschap levende Iraki’s, had dit ook op Qassim Alsaedy een grote impact. Hoewel zeker geen voorstander van de Amerikaanse invasie en bezetting (zoals de meeste van zijn landgenoten) betekende het wel dat, ondanks alle onzekerheden, er nieuwe mogelijkheden waren ontstaan. En bovenal dat het voor Alsaedy weer mogelijk was om zijn vaderland te bezoeken.  In de zomer van 2003 keerde hij voor het eerst terug. Naast

 

  

Qassim Alsaedy, object uit ‘Last Summer in Baghdad’, assemblage van kleurpotloden op paneel, 2003

Qassim Alsaedy, Shortly after the War, 2011 (detail)

dat hij natuurlijk zijn familie en oude vrienden had bezocht, sprak hij ook met een heleboel kunstenaars, dichters, schrijvers, musici, dansers en vele anderen over hoe het Iraakse culturele leven onder het regime van Saddam had geleden. Van de vele uren film die hij maakte, zond de VPRO een korte compilatie uit, in het kunstprogramma RAM, 19-10-2003 (hier te bekijken).

In de jaren daarna bleef dit bezoek een belangrijke bron van inspiratie. Alsaedy maakte verschillende installaties en objecten. Vaak zijn in deze werken twee kanten van de medaille vertegenwoordigd, zowel de oorlog en het geweld, maar ook de schoonheid, die eeuwig is en het tijdelijke overwint.

Vanaf halverwege de jaren 2000 is Qassim Alsaedy steeds zichtbaarder geworden in zowel Nederlandse als buitenlandse kunstinstellingen. Vanaf 2003 exposeerde hij regelmatig  in de gerenommeerde galerie van Frank Welkenhuysen in Utrecht, waar hij tegenwoordig als vaste kunstenaar aan verbonden is. Ook participeerde hij in de Biënnale van Florence in 2003 en exposeerde hij tweemaal in het Rijksmuseum van Oudheden. Een belangrijk hoogtepunt was zijn grote solotentoonstelling in het Flehite Museum in Amersfoort in 2006.

Met enige trots presenteren wij in Diversity & Art zijn project ‘Shortly after the War’.

Floris Schreve

Amsterdam, april 2011

 

 

 

222012_218632921487529_100000224696132_1002776_6152992_n[1]

215539_218632528154235_100000224696132_1002774_6885765_n[1]

 Qassim Alsaedy bij de inrichting van de tentoonstelling

Diversity & Art | Sint Nicolaasstraat 21 | 1012 NJ Amsterdam| The Netherlands | open: Thursday 13.00 – 19.00 | Friday and Saturday 13.00 – 17.00 

VERLENGD TOT ZATERDAG 4 JUNI 

 

قاسم الساعدي 

 

April 22-Qassim Alsaedy “Shortly after the War” May 28

Alsaedy

Opening on Friday April 22 at 17:30 by Neil van der Linden,
specialist in art and culture of the Arab and Muslim world
(mainly in the field of music and theater)

doors open at 16.30

LectureonTUESDAY,May 17at 20:00byFloris Schreve
“Modern and Contemporary ArtofIraqand the Arab world”

 
Qassim Alsaedy (Baghdad 1949) studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Baghdad from 1969 to 1973. He was a student of the late Shakir Hassan al-Said, one of the most significant and influential artists of Iraq and even the Arab World. During his time at the academy Alsaedy was arrested and imprisoned for almost a year. Free again in1979, he organized with other Iraqi artists an exhibition in Lebanon, in which they stated against the Iraqi regime. Back in Iraq, he joined the Kurdish rebels in the North, where he also was active as an artists and even exhibited in tents. After the Anfal campaign against the Kurds in1988 he withdrew to Libya where he could work in relative freedom and where he became a teacher at the Art Academy of Tripoli until 1994, when he came to the Netherlands .
Alsaedy’s work is dominated by two themes, love versus pain and the ongoing cycle of growth and decay, a recycling of material when man leaves his characters and traces as a sign of existence through the course of history.Love is represented by beauty in bright and deep colors. The pain from the scars of war and destruction is visualized by the empty cartridge cases from the battlefield or represented by the rusty nails, an important element in many of his works. “The pain has resolved as the nails are completely rusted away”, states Alsaedy. In his three dimensional work, the duality of pain and beauty is always the main theme.

For this occasion Qassim Alsaedy will present his installation of several objects ‘Shortly after the War’. The ceramic objects are created in collaboration with the Dutch/German artist Brigitte Reuter (see http://www.utrechtseaarde.nl/reuter_b.html )

 Alsaedy

An impression of Alsaedy’s recent work in his studio (February 2011):

See also:

http://www.qassim-alsaedy.com/

http://www.kunstexpert.com/kunstenaar.aspx?id=4481

http://www.diversityandart.com/centre.htm

See also on this blog:

Interview with the Iraqi artist Qassim Alsaedy

In Dutch:

Iraakse kunstenaars in ballingschap

Drie kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld

links naar artikelen en uitzendingen over kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld

Denkend aan Bagdad- door Lien Heyting

van International Network of Iraqi Artists (iNCIA), Londen: http://www.incia.co.uk/31293.html.

SOLO EXHIBITION

Qassim Alsaedy

22 Apr – 28 May 2011

Diversity and Art
Netherlands

Born Baghdad 1949, AlSaedy studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Baghdad from 1969-73. He was a student of the late Shakir Hassan al-Said, one of the most significant and influential artists of Iraq and even the Arab World. During his time at the academy Alsaedy was arrested and imprisoned for almost a year. Free again in1979, he organized with other Iraqi artists an exhibition in Lebanon, as a statement against the Iraqi regime. Back in Iraq, he joined the Kurdish rebels in the North, where he also was active as an artist and even exhibited in tents. After the Anfal campaign against the Kurds in 1988 he withdrew to Libya where he could work in relative freedom and where he became a teacher at the Art Academy of Tripoli until 1994, when he came to the Netherlands.  Alsaedy’s work is dominated by two themes, love versus pain and the ongoing cycle of growth and decay, a recycling of material when man leaves his characters and traces as a sign of existence through the course of history. Love is represented by beauty in bright and deep colors. The pain from the scars of war and destruction is visualized by the empty cartridge cases from the battlefield or represented by the rusty nails, an important element in many of his works. “The pain has resolved as the nails are completely rusted away”, states Alsaedy. In his three dimensional work, the duality of pain and beauty is always the main theme.  For this occasion Qassim Alsaedy will present his installation of several objects ‘Shortly after the War’. The ceramic objects are created in collaboration with the Dutch/German artist Brigitte Reuter.

Diversity & Art

van http://www.sutuur.com/ar/iraqi-outside/158-qassimalsaedy:

المعرض الجديد للفنان قاسم الساعدي

بعد الحرب بقليل

صياغة جديدة لمعادلة الامل والالم

الثاني والعشرون من نيسان الجاري , وعلى صالة كاليري

“DIVERSITY & ART ”

في امستردام , يفتتح المعرض الشخصي الجديد للفنان قاسم الساعدي , المعنون ب :

بعد الحرب بقليل

حيث سيعرض فيه مختارات من احدث اعماله, تضم لوحات , نحت , اعمال ثلاثية الابعاد, مخطوطة كتاب, وبعض قطع السيراميك التي انجزها الفنان بالتعاون مع الفنانة الالمانية بريجيت رويتر

وسيقدم الفنان اضافة الى ذلك عملا تركيبيا ” انستليشن ” يتكون من اكثر من خمسين قطعة مخلفة الاشكال والحجوم والتقنيات : لوحات صغيرة , منحوتات , سيراميك , كولاج …الخ , وقد استعار الفنان عنوان العمل التركيبي ليكون عنوان للمعرض باسره

ياءتي هذا المعرض , بعد معرضه الشخصي الذي افتتح منتتصف شهر تشرين الثاني نوفمبر , على فضاءات غاليري

” Frank Welkenhuysen ”

بمدينة اوترخت و وكان بعنوان : ” الطريق الى بغداد ” والذي حظي بنجاح واهتمام ملحوظ

يذكر ان على اجندة الفنان الساعدي العديد من المشاريع والمعارض التي ستستضيفها بعض الغاليريات والمتاحف في هولندا وبلجيكا والمملكة المتحدة .

هذا ويتطلع الفنان الى اقامة معرضه الشخصي في وطنه العراق , ويصفه بالحلم الممكن والمستحيل

لمزيد من المعلومات عن المعرض:

http://www.diversityandart.com/

Opening

 

Qassim Alsaedy met Brigitte Reuter (met wie hij samen het keramische werk maakte)

De Iraakse kunstenaars Wiedad Thamer, Salam Djaaz, Aras Kareem en Iman Ali

Qassim Alsaedy voor de camera van de Iraakse journalist Riyad Fartousi (zie filmpje helemaal onderaan dit bericht)

Qassims vrouw Nebal en dochter Urok

1289654202_6_gRs0[1]

vlnr ikzelf, de Iraaks Koerdische journalist Goran Baba Ali (hoofdredacteur Ex Ponto), de Iraakse schrijver en journalist Riyad Fartousi, Qassim Alsaedy, Nebal Shamky (Qassims vrouw) en Ali Reza (onze Iraanse bovenbuurman)

De Iraaks Koerdische kunstenaar Aras Kareem (zie deze eerdere expositie), bij het werk van Qassim Alsaedy

Neil van der Linden, die de opening verrichtte

vlnr Goran Baba Ali, Herman Divendal (van AIDA), ikzelf, Riyad Fartousi, Qassim Alsaedy, Liesbeth Schreve, Scarlett Hooft Graafland en nog een bezoeker

interview met Qassim Alsaedy en Goran Baba Ali op de opening voor een Arabische zender (http://www.sutuur.com/ar/video)

Interview met Qassim Alsaedy door Entisar Al-Ghareeb

invisible hit counter

Drie kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld in Nederland (fragmenten scriptie)

ثلاثة فنانين من الدول العربية في هولندا

Voor mijn afstudeerscriptie over hedendaagse kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld die wonen en werken in Nederland schreef ik, naast de ontwikkeling van de moderne kunst in de Arabische wereld zelf, de verschillende redenen van waarom deze kunstenaars zich in Nederland hebben gevestigd en het meer theoretische kader, ook een aantal portretten van individuele kunstenaars.
Eerder heb ik op dit weblog al een fragment gepubliceerd over het gedachtegoed van Edward Said en zijn polemiek met Kanan Makiya (vooral van belang voor de theoretische achtergrond). Het leek mij aardig om hier drie individuele kunstenaars te presenteren, uit drie verschillende landen, van verschillende generaties en elk met een verschillende reden voor hun vestiging in Nederland.
Achnaton Nassar uit Egypte kwam naar Nederland om zijn opleiding te vervolgen en is uiteindelijk hier gebleven. Qassim Alsaedy uit Irak kwam naar Nederland als politiek vluchteling. Rachid Ben Ali, de jongste, komt uit een achtergrond van Marokkaanse migranten.
Er ruim boven de honderd kunstenaars uit de Arabische wereld in Nederland actief. En natuurlijk, zoveel kunstenaars, zoveel individuen, persoonlijkheden en stijlen. Deze gedifferentieerdheid heb ik ook altijd centraal gesteld, al was het maar om duidelijk te maken dat er niet iets van een typische ‘Arabische moderne kunst’ bestaat , of een typisch ‘Nederlandse Arabische kunst’. De hier besproken drie voorbeelden laten dat duidelijk zien. Wel is het zo dat alle drie markante voorbeelden zijn van een boeiende culturele kruisbestuiving, die tot voor kort onzichtbaar was en sinds enige tijd weer sterk onder druk is komen te staan. Overigens als je wat zou willen zeggen over hoe deze kunstenaars zich tot de traditie van hun land van herkomst verhouden (in ieder geval tot de moderne kunst, zoals die in de twintigste eeuw tot ontwikkeling is gekomen in respectievelijk Egypte, Irak en Marokko) dan zou je kunnen stellen dat Qassim Alsaedy van deze drie het meest in de traditie past van de moderne Iraakse kunst. Wie meer voorbeelden heeft gezien zou dat vrij makkelijk kunnen herkennen, zij het dat Qassim wel een heel sterke persoonlijke stijl heeft. Achnaton Nassars abstracte werk past zeker in een bredere ontwikkeling van de kunst van de Arabische wereld, zoals hij bijvoorbeeld de traditie van de lettertekens verwerkt. Maar ook zijn stijl is strikt persoonlijk. Het werk van Rachid Ben Ali, hoewel zijn achtergrond wel degelijk een rol speelt, staat eigenlijk geheel los van de moderne kunst in Marokko zelf, maar Rachid is pas kunstenaar geworden in Nederland en dus niet direct beïnvloed door de belangrijke Marokkaanse kunstenaars als Farid Belkahia, Ahmed Cherkaoui, Mohammed Abouellouakar of Fouad Belamine, hoewel hij te kennen heeft gegeven zeker bewondering te hebben voor de laatste en wellicht is er iets van een oppervlakkige verwantschap.
Het belangrijkste in dit verband is dat deze kunstenaars drie bijzondere individuen zijn, die alledrie op hun eigen manier een bijzondere verrijking betekenen voor het culturele leven in ons land.
Deze teksten zijn geschreven in 2001 (de interviews die ik met de kunstenaars had zijn uit 2000 en 2001), dus wellicht alweer verouderd. Vanzelfsprekend hebben deze drie kunstenaars zich sinds die tijd weer verder ontwikkeld. Toch denk ik dat het nog veel van deze drie portretten in grote lijnen nog redelijk volstaan. Het zijn drie losse fragmenten uit het tweede hoofdstuk van mijn scriptie, over drie verschillende kunstenaars, met verschillende achtergronden en werkwijzen en uit drie verschillende landen.

Wel zijn er wat extra afbeeldingen toegevoegd, ook van recenter werk (dus van ruim nadat ik deze teksten geschreven had).

 

 

Nassar schaatsen

Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel, olieverf op paneel, 1992

 Achnaton Nassar

‘Achnaton’ Wahib Mahmoud Abou Nassar werd in 1952 geboren in Qena, Egypte. Hij volgde in eerste instantie zijn kunstenaarsopleiding aan de universiteiten van Alexandrië en Cairo. Hier werd hij opgeleid in de islamitische traditie, waarbij het Arabische alfabet als uitgangspunt diende. Nassar vond dit te beperkt. De drang om zich verder te ontwikkelen dreef hem naar Europa. Na een studie architectuur in het Griekse Saloniki deed Nassar zijn toelatingsexamen voor de Rijksacademie, te Amsterdam.
De tekeningen die hij inleverde voor zijn toelating werden door de docenten wat vreemd gevonden. Het werk was geïnspireerd op de Islamitische kalligrafie, een manier van werken die hier volledig onbekend was. De docenten van de Rijksacademie besloten Nassar een tweede kans te geven. Hij kreeg een schetsboek en een potlood met de opdracht tekeningen te maken op de Albert Cuypmarkt. De resultaten werden als zeer goed beoordeeld en Nassar werd ruimschoots toegelaten tot de Rijksacademie.
Na zijn studietijd keerde Nassar voor een paar jaar terug naar Egypte. Lang heeft zijn vertrek niet geduurd, al snel ging hij weer naar Nederland om zich in Amstelveen definitief als kunstenaar te vestigen. Sinds die tijd is hij zeer actief geweest. Hij nam deel aan belangrijke tentoonstellingen als Het Klimaat en Het land dat in mij woont. In 1993 won hij de Europaprijs voor de schilderkunst in Oostende.

Het omvangrijke oeuvre van Nassar is van een grote stilistische diversiteit. Hij werkt zowel figuratief als abstract, hij schildert en tekent, of werkt met collages en een enkele keer met een installatie. Soms nemen zijn werken op een politieke manier stelling, een andere keer zijn het lyrische abstracties. Opvallend is Nassars gebruik van ironie, dat hij als stijlmiddel op een buitengewoon uitbundige wijze toepast in zijn figuratieve werk. Hierbij put hij uit veel verschillende bronnen zoals, de Nederlandse en de Arabische kunstgeschiedenis, volkscultuur, reclamebeelden en kitschobjecten.
Het omvangrijke oeuvre van Nassar is van een grote stilistische diversiteit. Hij werkt zowel figuratief als abstract, hij schildert en tekent, of werkt met collages en een enkele keer met een installatie. Soms nemen zijn werken op een politieke manier stelling, een andere keer zijn het lyrische abstracties. Opvallend is Nassars gebruik van ironie, dat hij als stijlmiddel op een buitengewoon uitbundige wijze toepast in zijn figuratieve werk. Hierbij put hij uit veel verschillende bronnen zoals, de Nederlandse en de Arabische kunstgeschiedenis, volkscultuur, reclamebeelden en kitschobjecten.
Een duidelijk voorbeeld is Zonder Titel uit 1995 (afb. 43). Men ziet de poort van een gebouw, dat onmiskenbaar Arabische trekken vertoont, met daarvoor een uitstalling van een verzameling schoenen . Ogenschijnlijk gaat het hier om een moskee en zijn de schoenen van degenen die binnen aan het bidden zijn. Bij nadere bestudering klopt dit beeld niet helemaal. De schoenen blijken Hollandse klompen te zijn. De poort is niet versierd met Islamitische decoraties, hij blijkt overladen te zijn met Delfts blauwe kitsch-tegeltjes. Waar gaat het hier om? Is dit een moskeepoort of iets anders? Gaat dit werk over de Islam of zegt het vooral iets over ons?

 

Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel, acryl op paneel, 1995

 

Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel, acryl op paneel, 1995-2000

 

Nassar leeuwen.JPG

Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel, acryl op (dubbelzijdig) paneel, 1996

 

Als geen ander is Nassar een meester in het maken van beeldgrappen. Dit geldt vooral voor zijn figuratieve werk. Tekenend is bijvoorbeeld Zonder Titel, 1995 (afb. 44). Het beeld verwijst naar het bankbiljet voor duizend gulden, waarop de kop van Spinoza staat uitgebeeld. Door kleine ingrepen is het beeld van betekenis veranderd. Het gebruikelijke 1000 gulden is vervangen met 1001 Nacht en De Nederlandsche Bank is veranderd in De Wereldliteratuurbank. Het biljet is getekend door president N. Mahfouz op 22 juli 1952, de dag van de Egyptische revolutie en bovendien Nassars geboortedag. Een opmerkelijk detail zijn de met goudverf aangebrachte lijnen in het gezicht van Spinoza. Deze lijnen, die lopen vanaf het profiel van de neus via de rechter wenkbrauw naar het rechteroog, vormen het woord Baruch in het Arabisch, Spinoza’s voornaam (achtereenvolgens de letters Ba, Alif, Ra en Kha). Op deze wijze plaatst Nassar een Nederlands symbool als het duizend gulden biljet in een nieuwe context. Spinoza was immers in zijn tijd ook een vreemdeling, namelijk een nazaat van Portugese Joden. Met een werk als dit stelt Nassar belangrijke vragen over nationale versus hybride identiteit en maakt hij een statement over de betrekkelijkheid van symboliek als een statisch referentiepunt van nationale identificatie.
Een ander typerend voorbeeld is de symbolische verbeelding van twee leeuwen. Rechts zien wij de Ottomaanse leeuw, links de Nederlandse leeuw, gerepresenteerd in de vorm van de kaart van Nederland, wat in de zestiende en zeventiende eeuw zeer gebruikelijk was. Opmerkelijk is dat de Nederlandse leeuw is weergegeven tegen een achtergrond van Delfts Blauwe tegeltjes (afb. 45). Toch gaat het hier niet om het traditionele Delftse aardewerk; de tegels bevatten afbeeldingen van een zelfportret van Rembrandt, de naam van Allah in het Arabisch, logo’s van Nederlandse bedrijven en zelfs een streepjescode. Hoge kunst, volkscultuur, commercie en kitsch geven gezamenlijk een ironisch beeld van het begrip ‘Nederlandse identiteit’.

Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel, acryl op hout, 1995 -object voor de tentoonstelling ‘Het land dat in mij woont’, Gate Foundation, Amsterdam, en het Museum voor Volkenkunde (nu Wereldmuseum), Rotterdam, 1995

 

 

 Bovenstaande afbeeldingen: Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel,triptiek, olieverf op doek, 1995-2001

 

nassar13.jpg (27967 bytes)

 

Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel. Pastel op papier 2000. De slootjes vormen het woord ‘Allah’ in Arabisch schrift

 

 

Achnaton Nassar, zonder titel, dekbedovertrek, 1997. Het terugkerende ‘ornament’ tussen de molentjes vormt wederom het woord ‘Allah’ in Arabisch schrift, zij het in een meer kalligrafische vorm dan het voorgaande voorbeeld

 

De thematiek van Nassars figuratieve werk doet enigszins denken aan de serie Reconquista van Nour-Eddine Jarram (zie bijvoorbeeld hier). Toch gaat hij hierin veel verder en maakt hij meer gebruik van beelden uit de massacultuur. De essentie van zijn werk ligt in het feit hoe de een naar de ander kijkt en de ander weer naar de een. Het werk van Nassar getuigt van een snelle associatieve intelligentie, waardoor hij in staat is de meest bizarre verbanden te leggen. Hiermee legt hij bepaalde thema’s bloot, die zonder zijn werk verborgen zouden blijven. De ‘Oosterling’ kijkt naar de ‘Westerling’ volgens een bepaald mechanisme, maar Nassar heeft vooral dit thema in omgekeerde richting verwerkt: wat is de cultureel bepaalde blik van het ‘Westen’ naar de ‘Oriënt’? Met zijn beeldinterventies maakt hij grote associatieve sprongen door de geschiedenis en van de ‘hoge’ kunst naar de populaire cultuur. Hij ontmaskert hiermee een heel corpus van ideeën en vooroordelen, aangaande neokolonialisme en vals exotisme. Edward Said spreekt in dit verband van oriëntalisme, maar hier zal in hoofdstuk 4 nog uitgebreid op worden teruggekomen. (zie voor dat specifieke gedeelte uit mijn vierde hoofdstuk het andere fragment uit mijn scriptie dat op dit blog is gepubliceerd ‘Edward Said, Orientalism en de post-koloniale denkrichting’, hier te lezen).

 

Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel, gemengde technieken op papier, 1992

 

 Achnaton Nassar, Zonder Titel, gemengde technieken op papier, 1998/99

 

ac0002.jpeg

Achnaton Nassar, Zonder titel, gemengde technieken op papier, 2000

 

Achnaton Nassar, zonder titel, collage, 2001

 

Nassars tekeningen zijn van een geheel andere aard. Eigenlijk vormen deze de ruggengraat van zijn omvangrijke oeuvre. De tekeningen zijn in regel abstract, vaak zowel geïnspireerd op de natuurlijke vormen die hij aantreft in het Amsterdamse bos, waar hij vlakbij woont, als op de kalligrafische traditie waarin hij oorspronkelijk is opgeleid (afb. 46). Opvallend is de enorme hoeveelheid technieken die hij voor deze tekeningen inzet. Zo werkt hij met houtskool, pen en inkt, acrylverf, krijt, gouache en pastel en maakt hij ook gebruik van collages. In zijn meest recente tekeningen is hij sterk met het thema ‘sluiers’ bezig (afb. 47). Over de organische structuren die soms de vorm aannemen van een soort minaret, hangt vaak een nevelige sluier, van een onbestemde materie. Het zou hier net zo goed om zijde kunnen gaan als om haar of spinrag. Met werken als deze laat Nassar zich van zijn meest poëtische kant zien.

 

                 

             

            

  een zestal tekeningen (periode 2005-2008) van Nassars online schetsboek, zie http://www.wix.com/achnaton/artbook

 Nassar abstract 6.jpg

Zonder titel, gemengde technieken op papier/collage, 1996

nassar19.jpg (53507 bytes)

Achnaton Nassar, zonder titel, gemengde technieken op papier,  1998-1999

zie ook mijn catalogustekst van de tentoonstelling ‘Saskia en Hassan gaan trouwen; Achnaton Nassar, een kunstenaar uit twee culturen’, Univeriteitsbibliotheek Leiden, 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

Qassim Alsaedy

Qassim Alsaedy (Bagdad, 1949) studeerde van 1969 tot 1974 aan de kunstacademie van Bagdad, waar hij werd opgeleid door Faik Hassan en Shakir Hassan Al Sa’aid. Hoewel hij in de jaren zeventig een goede reputatie had weten op te bouwen in Irak, heeft hij daar, vanaf het begin van de jaren tachtig, niet meer geëxposeerd in de officiële instellingen. Dit laatste is niet zo vreemd; door zijn onafhankelijke opstelling was Alsaedy al vaker in conflict gekomen met het Baathregime en moest hij een aantal keren in de politieke gevangenis zijn tijd doorbrengen, in dit geval ‘al-Qasr an-Nihayya’, het beruchte ‘Paleis van het Einde’. In de jaren tachtig sloot hij zich aan bij de Koerdische rebellen, waar hij overigens ook als kunstenaar actief was. Hij exposeerde daar zelfs in tenten, voor de guerrillastrijders en de gevluchte dorpelingen, tijdens de zogenaamde Anfal operaties, de beruchte campagnes met chemische wapens van Saddam Hoessein tegen de Koerden in Noord Irak in de jaren tachtig. Naar aanleiding van deze periode maakte hij een aantal zeer indrukwekkende werken. Alsaedy: ‘I joined the movement which was against the regime. I worked there also as an artist. I exhibited there and made an exhibition in a tent for all these people in the villages, but anyhow, the most amazing was the Iraqi regime uses a very special policy against Kurdistan, against this area and also against other places in Iraq. They burned and sacrificed the fields by using enormous bombings. So you see, and I saw it by myself, huge fields became totally black. The houses, trees, grass, everything was black. But look, when you see the burned grass, late in the season, you could see some little green points, because the life and the beauty is stronger than the bastards. The life was coming through. So you saw black, but there was some green coming up. For example I show you this painting which is extremely black, but it is to deep in my heart. Maybe you can see it hardly but when you look very sensitive you see some little traces of life. You see the life is still there. It shines trough the blackness. The life is coming back’.

Qassim Alsaedy, Black Field, olieverf op doek, 1999

 

Toen het hem eind jaren tachtig te moeilijk werd om zich in het Koerdische gebied te handhaven, besloot hij naar Libië te emigreren. In eerste instantie trok een bestaan in een asielzoekerscentrum in een West Europees land hem niet. Alsaedy: “I am an artist who still can work. I really believe that you have to fight for your last square meter to stand on. So Lybia was my only possibility. Maybe it was a kind of destiny”.
In Libië werd Alsaedy docent aan de kunstacademie van Tripoli. Ook voerde hij een groot muurschilderingenproject uit. Tegen zijn eigen verwachting in kreeg hij toestemming voor zijn plannen. Zoals hij het mij vertelde: “I worked as a teacher on the academy of Tripoli, but the most interesting thing I did there was making many huge wallpaintings. The impossible happened when the citycounsel of Tripoli supported me to do something like that. I had always the dream how to make the city as beautiful as possible. I was thinking about Bagdad when I made it. My old dream was to do something like that in Bagdad, but it was always impossible to do that, because of the regime. I believe all the people in the world have the right on freedom, on water, on sun, on air, but also the right on beauty. They have the right on beauty in the world, or in their

 

(40).jpg

Qassim Alsaedy, Remembrance, olieverf op doek, 1999

 

Qassim Alsaedy, Touches, olieverf op doek, 1998.

 

lives. So one of my aims was to make wallpaintings and I worked hard on it. They were abstract paintings, but I tried to give them something of the atmosphere of the city. It is an Arabic, Islamic city with Italian elements. I tried to make something new when I studied the Islamic architecture. I worked on them with my students and so something very unusual happened, especially for the girls, because in our society it is not very usual to see the girls painting on the
street. It was a kind of a shock, but in a nice way. It brought something positive”. Alsaedy verbleef zeven jaar in Libië. Toch bleef zijn situatie daar erg onzeker. In 1994 vluchtte hij naar Nederland.
Thematisch verwijst ook Qassim Alsaedy naar het oude Mesopotamië. Interessant is bij hem niet dat hij dit doet, maar hoe hij dit thema heeft verwerkt. Centraal staan voor hem de oude inscripties en sporen op muren, als tekens van menselijk leven en beschaving. Hierin doet hij enigszins denken aan zijn leermeester Shakir Hassan Al Sa’aid (zie voorbeeld), hoewel hun uitgangspunten heel verschillend zijn. Verwees Al Sa’aid vooral naar het Islamitische erfgoed, Alsaedy tracht met zijn werken een organische verbinding met het verleden

 

Qassim Alsaedy, Rythms in Blue, olieverf op doek, 1997

 

aan te gaan. Voor hem bestaat de relatie met het verleden uit een cyclisch proces, waarmee hij in permanente interactie staat. De oude Mesopotamische culturen waren immers gebouwd van klei. Deze klei is vergaan tot stof en verwaaid met de wind. Het is de stof die je inademt, of die in de rivier terecht komt, om weer opnieuw in klei te veranderen. Alsaedy: “It is on your clothes and in your breath, in your blood and in your memory”.
Alsaedy is ook buitengewoon gefascineerd geraakt door de prehistorische rotsschilderingen van de oude Sahara culturen. Hij kwam hiermee in aanraking toen hij in Libië woonde. Hele generaties krasten daar hun ‘boodschappen’ op de rotsmuren, laag over laag. Alsaedy vergelijkt dit met zijn eigen werkproces. Ook hij ‘krast’ zijn abstracte tekens in de dikke olieverflagen van zijn schilderijen (afb. 67 en 68 ). Zijn tekenschrift is iets dat hij al van jongs af aan heeft meegekregen. Naast het feit dat hij veel tijd heeft doorgebracht tussen de ruïnes van Babylon, communiceerde hij op een soort ‘schriftelijke’ manier veel met zijn moeder. Zij was immers analfabeet, maar ontwikkelde een soort eigen ‘spijkerschrift’ om zich te uiten. Nu Alsaedy in ballingschap leeft zijn zijn doeken ook een soort boodschappen aan haar. Alsaedy in een kort statement over zijn werk: “Ik probeer boodschappen te schilderen aan mijn geliefde maar verwonde vaderland, de verloren vlinders uit mijn jeugd, aan mijn moeder die een slechte relatie heeft met het alfabet en aan Babylon dat ik zo verschrikkelijk mis”.
Het afgebeelde Rythms in Blue uit 1997 (ab. 69) is hier een goed voorbeeld van. Van dichtbij bekeken is het werk een wirwar van krassen en tekens, met hier en daar een vage vlek. Bij een beschouwing van iets meer afstand wordt de structuur van het schilderij zichtbaar.
Opvallend is de dominante piramidevorm, een verbeelding van de Dom van Utrecht. Alsaedy schilderde dit werk immers in zijn hoge flat in Bilthoven, van waar hij een panoramisch uitzicht heeft op Utrecht. Tegelijkertijd schijnen er andere vormen door de vele verflagen. Twee lichte vlekken suggereren twee koepels. Het zijn Alsaedy’s herinneringen aan Bagdad. Kijkend naar Utrecht en denkend aan Bagdad, dit gegeven heeft hij met dit abstracte werk tot uitdrukking gebracht.

 

 Qassim Alsaedy, Rhythms in White, assemblage van dobbelstenen, 1999

 

Qassim Alsaedy, Rhythms, spijkers op hout, 1998

 

Op dit moment houdt Alsaedy zich bezig met een interessant tekeningenproject. Met pen en penseel brengt hij met inkt zijn tekeningen aan op doorschijnend papier. Door al deze papieren op elkaar te leggen ontstaat er weer een nieuw geheel van lagen van beelden, tekens, schaduwen en herinneringen. Op termijn hoopt hij deze reeks in boekvorm te kunnen uitgeven (zie hier inmiddels drie voorbeelden, of onderstaande afbeelding, FS 2009).
Internationaal exposeerde Alsaedy in Syrië, Tunesië, de Verenigde Arabische Emiraten (de Sharjah Biënnales van 1997 en 2001), België, Duitsland, Frankrijk en Zweden. Qassim Alsaedy woont nog altijd in Bilthoven. Sinds twee jaar heeft hij zijn atelier in De Bilt. Binnen Nederland participeerde hij in de tentoonstelling Versluierde Taal in Rijswijk in 1999 en aan de groepsexpositie van Irakese kunstenaars in Den Haag in 2000. Daarnaast heeft hij een aantal keren geëxposeerd in Hilversum en Utrecht.

 

Qasim Alsaedy/Brigitte Reuter (zie http://www.utrechtseaarde.nl/reuter_alsaedy.html), Garden Stones, keramiek, 2003

 

Tot zover de oorspronkelijke tekst uit mijn scriptie. Toen ik Qassim in 2000 leerde kennen was hij in Nederland nog nauwelijks bekend. Dat is inmiddels veranderd. Vanaf 2001/2002 begon zijn werk in de Utrechtse kunstwereld steeds meer op te vallen. Uiteindelijk kwam hij ook in het vizier van Frank Welckenhuysen, gerenommeerd kunstexpert en galerie-houder (hij is ook bekend van het televisieprogramma ‘Tussen kunst en kitsch’, waarin hij voornamelijk als expert van negentiende en twintigste eeuwse kunst optreedt). Inmiddels is Qassim een van zijn vaste kunstenaars en exposeert regelmatig in zijn galerie in het oude centrum van Utrecht (zie link). Vanuit die positie heeft Qassim zijn vleugels steeds verder uitgeslagen en exposeert hij in binnen en buitenland. In Nederland was zijn belangrijkste hoogtepunt tot nu toe een grote solo-expositie in het Flehite Museum in Amersfoort in 2006. Deze werd geopend door de nieuw aangetreden ambassadeur van Irak, ZE dhr. Siamand Banna (vanzelfsprekend de nieuwe vertegenwoordiger van het ‘post-Saddam’ Irak in Nederland). Qassim geldt nu als een van de bekendste Iraakse kunstenaars in Nederland en wordt in steeds meer publicaties gezien als een kwalitatief hoogstaande en zeer uitgesproken voorbeeld van een Nederlandse kunstenaar met een migranten achtergrond. Ook in internationaal verband valt zijn naam steeds vaker als een belangrijke representant van de Iraakse eigentijdse kunst. In die zin is er voor hem zelf een heleboel veranderd sinds ik hem leerde kennen en bovenstaande tekst schreef.

        

           

                 

Enkele details uit Alsaedy’s tekeningenboekjes uit 2001 (zie hier voor meer)

 

Qassim Alsaedy, Saltwall, olieverf op doek, 2005

 

 
Qassim Alsaedy, uit de serie Faces of Baghdad, assemblage van metaal en lege patroonhulzen op paneel, 2005 (geëxposeerd op de Biënnale van Florence van 2005)
 
 
 
  
Qassim Alsaedy, uit ‘Last Summer in Baghdad’, assemblage van kleurpotloden op paneel, 2003

 

 
     

Qassim Alsaedy, Who said no?, installatie Flehite Museum Amersfoort, 2006

 

 

Qassim Alsaedy, Baghdad of pain & hope, installatie Flehite Museum Amersfoort, 2006

 

Qassim Alsaedy (ism Brigitte Reuter), Oasis Stones, keramiek, Flehite Museum, 2006

enkele impressies uit Qassims atelier (maart 2011)

 

Zie ook op dit blog mijn interview met Qassim Alsaedy, waar ook links zijn opgenomen naar andere sites en artikelen en ook televisie uitzendingen over deze kunstenaar. Ook is op dit blog een groot artikel opgenomen van Lien Heyting, oorspronkelijk verschenen in het Cultureel Supplement van NRC Handelsblad, aan de vooravond van de Amerikaanse aanval op Irak. Voor dit arkel interviewde zij Qassim, de Iraakse kunstenaar Nedim Kufi en mijzelf (nav een lezing een paar weken daarvoor). Over de geschiedenis van de moderne kunst van Irak en de Iraakse diaspora (waaronder ook aandacht voor Qassim), zie het artikel dat ik schreef voor het tijdschrift ‘Zemzem, over het Midden Oosten, Noord Afrika en Islam’, maar ook op dit blog verschenen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rachid Ben Ali

Een kunstenaar die plotseling is doorgebroken in de gevestigde Nederlandse kunstcircuits is de uit Marokko afkomstige schilder Rachid Ben Ali. Zo was hij te zien in het Groninger Museum en exposeerde hij in New York. In het najaar 2000 kocht het Stedelijk Museum twee doeken van hem, waarvan er een te zien was in het Stedelijk Paleis, de tentoonstelling die werd samengesteld door koningin Beatrix (2000-2001). In 2001 had hij een grote solo-expositie in het Wereldmuseum, te Rotterdam.
Als kind onderging hij een ooroperatie die van beslissende betekenis was voor zijn verdere levensloop; Ben Ali werd immers doofstom geboren. In Nederland volgde hij kortstondig enkele opleidingen. Nadat hij voor een korte tijd studeerde aan de modeacademie van Antwerpen en de kunstacademie van Arnhem, vestigde hij zich als kunstenaar in Amsterdam.

 

 Rachid Ben Ali, Zonder titel, gemengde technieken op doek, 2000

 

Ben Ali werkt in een stijl die het midden houdt tussen figuratie en abstractie, hoewel er een ontwikkeling valt waar te nemen dat zijn werken in de loop van zijn korte werkzame periode als kunstenaar steeds abstracter zijn geworden. Ben Ali begint aan een abstracte ondergrond.Hierin gaat hij zeer emotioneel te werk. Vaak smeert hij de verf letterlijk met zijn

 

Rachid Ben Ali, Zonder titel, gemengde technieken op doek, 1999

 

handen op het doek. Later brengt hij figuren aan. Ook maakt hij veel gebruik van teksten, zowel in het Nederlands, het Engels of het Arabisch (zie bijv. afb. 81, 82, 83 en 84). Volgens de kunstcriticus Wim van der Beek moeten deze teksten vooral worden begrepen als beeldelementen. Het zijn een soort ‘richtingaanwijzers’ in het totaalbeeld. Toch is het mij opgevallen dat hij vaak teksten gebruikt die hem direct raken. Ben Ali put hiervoor direct uit alles wat hij dagelijks tegenkomt en hem emotioneel raakt. Het gaat hier niet om de literaire waarde, het zijn elementen die versterken wat hij op dat moment te zeggen heeft. Zijn werk heeft namelijk een sterk narratief karakter; ieder werk heeft zijn eigen verhaal.
Met zijn hevig geëmotioneerde werken, bestaande uit schilderijen, tekeningen en collages, wil Rachid Ben Ali de wereld doorgronden zoals hij die waarneemt. Zijn werk is altijd een reactie op zijn omgeving. Hierbij spelen zowel de eigen waarneming als de bijbehorende emoties en onderbewuste associaties een belangrijke rol. Dit gebeurt op een compromisloze wijze, zonder vals effectbejag of maniërisme. “In mijn werk kan ik niet liegen. Alleen als je volslagen eerlijk bent kun je deuren openen die anders gesloten blijven”.
In eerste instantie speelde zijn homoseksualiteit een belangrijke rol in zijn werk. Zijn doeken werden vaak overheerst door figuren, waarvan de genitaliën zeer expliciet werden weergegeven. Een duidelijk voorbeeld hiervan is een werk uit 1999 (afb. 80). In de korte tijd daarna verbrede hij zijn thematiek en richtte hij zich meer op de actualiteit. Belangrijk is voor hem het persoonlijke verhaal.

 

 Rachid Ben Ali, zonder titel, gemengde technieken op doek, 2001

 

Ben Ali’s werk gaat nooit over grote politieke thema’s, althans niet op een directe manier. Zijn interesse gaat meer uit naar het persoonlijke en het individuele. Toch komen de belangrijke politieke vragen van deze tijd vaak op een indirecte manier aan de orde. De dood van Palestijnse kinderen (afb. 83), een bewerkte foto van een illegale vluchteling, of de geboorte van een misvormd kind dat op zal groeien in een wereld zonder mogelijkheden om zich in het bestaan te redden, het zijn allemaal kwesties die veel te maken hebben met de wereld waarin wij nu leven. Rachid Ben Ali uit zijn engagement echter op een menselijke schaal en toont zijn betrokkenheid vooral met de menselijke gebeurtenissen van de geschiedenis.

Ben Ali’s Marokkaanse afkomst speelt wel degelijk een rol in zijn werk, zij het niet in formele zin. Het gaat hem niet om stilistische verwijzingen naar de Arabische cultuur. “Ik wil
schilderen wat er in de hoofden van al die vaders zit. Het is onzinnig om alles wat uit Marokko komt te associëren met exotische kleuren. Ook daar is net zo veel zwart en wit te vinden in het innerlijk van de mensen als hier”.
De ‘Vader’ is een belangrijk thema in het werk van Rachid Ben Ali. Het gaat hem hierbij niet om een specifiek persoon als wel om een universeel symbool, van de gedesoriënteerde migrant. Collages van oude landkaarten, waarover gezichten zijn geschilderd en bewerkt met glasverf, brengen dit gegeven tot uitdrukking (zie afb. 110). De landkaarten van lang geleden verwijzen naar een wereld die er niet meer is. De figuren op deze werken lijken soms op dolende zielen die, losgerukt van alles wat hen dierbaar is, in een onzekere realiteit wanhopig op zoek zijn hun eigen weg te vinden. De ‘Vader’ wiens grootste wens het is om terug te keren, bevindt zich, gebonden door de omstandigheden, in een onmogelijke positie.
Het gegeven van ontworteling is echter slechts een gedeelte van zijn thematiek. Door een permanent proces van waarneming en introspectie vindt hij in zijn werk mogelijke antwoorden op de vraag wat zijn plaats is in het hier en nu. Bewust van zijn eigen achtergrond weet hij zich staande te houden in de chaos van het heden, waar hij vaak aanloopt tegen een omgeving van geestelijke leegheid of totale fragmentatie en verwarring.

 

 Rachid Ben Ali, zonder titel, acryl op doek, 2001

 

“Het verleden is een land waaruit wij allen zijn geëmigreerd”, stelt Salman Rushdie in zijn essay Imaginary Homelands. Rachid Ben Ali visualiseert dit thema op een indringende manier. Hij toont ons dat wij eigenlijk allen migranten zijn in een snel veranderende wereld, waarin begrippen als plaats, herkomst en identiteit steeds meer inwisselbaar zijn geworden.
Ontworteling versus identiteit, het zijn de twee polen waartussen Rachid Ben Ali zich beweegt. Een totale remigratie is een onmogelijkheid, een totale desoriëntatie evenmin. De weg hiertussen is een welhaast schizofrene zoektocht, maar het levert ook beelden op die van een grote zeggingskracht getuigen.
Het werk van Ben Ali lijkt enigszins op dat van Jean Michel Basquiat, waar hij ook al een aantal keren mee is vergeleken. Ook hij was een migrant, die in het grote New York zichzelf moest zien te redden en deze strijd omzette in een zeer originele beeldtaal. Toch gaat deze vergelijking wat mij betreft niet geheel op. Het werk van Rachid Ben Ali is in psychologisch opzicht complexer en is thematisch in een veel sterkere mate meerduidig. Met zijn werken raakt hij een universele problematiek van ontwrichting. Tegelijkertijd zijn zijn voor velerlei uitleg vatbare doeken reflecties op de verschillende achtergronden van zijn culturele bagage en persoonlijke geschiedenis.

 

    

de bovenstaande drie tekeningen/collages maakte Rachid Ben Ali in het najaar 2001, direct na de aanslagen van 11 september

 

Rachid Ben Ali, Bloothed, installatie, het Domein, Sittard, 2002

 

   

Drie detailfoto’s van Ben Ali’s installatie Bloothed.

 

idem
 
  
Rachid Ben Ali, Zonder titel, acryl op doek, 2007 (bron)

Zie voor het recente werk en achtergrondinformatie de site van Witzenhausen Gallery (Amsterdam/New York): http://www.witzenhausengallery.nl/artist.php?idxArtist=185

Verder is er over Rachid Ben Ali  veel terug te vinden op internet, vooral veel gediscussieer over het mogelijk controversiële karakter van zijn recentere werk. Wie verder wil lezen kan het beste gewoon zijn naam googlen. Dit artikel is zeker een goede introductie op zijn meer recente ontwikkelingen, waarin bovendien weer een heleboel links zijn opgenomen. Dat Ben Ali met zijn werk veel losmaakt (wat mij betreft alleen maar ten goede, zowel naar de Nederlandse kant als de Marokkaanse kant), blijkt wel uit de verschillende discussies op internet, zoals hier. Overigens heeft ook het werk van Achnaton Nassar een keer tot een (onterechte) controverse geleid, waarin ikzelf mij genoodzaakt voelde om ook mijn zegje te doen, dat weer leidde tot een aardige botsing met dhr. Klaas Wilting, de toenmalige woordvoerder van de politie Amsterdam/Amstelland. Een surrealistische discussie op de radio vond plaats tussen dhr. Wilting en Prof. Dr. P.S. van Koningsveld, hoogleraar islamologie aan de Universiteit Leiden, die het Wilting niet gemakkelijk maakte. Een weerslag deze kwestie is nog te vinden in dit artikel uit Trouw. Mijn eigen verslag van de gebeurtissen heb ik in mijn scriptie verwerkt. Dat fragment is hier te lezen

Over meer materiaal gelieerd aan mijn scriptie heb ik een keer een appart item gemaakt, met links naar andere artikelen, radio en televisie uitzendingen. Daar komen ook een paar andere markante kunstenaars aan bod (zoals Ziad Haider en Aras Kareem uit Irak en Nour Eddine Jarram uit Marokko). Zie daarvoor dit eerdere blogartikel.

Floris Schreve

 فلوريس سحرافا
online adverteren www.m4n.nl

123tijdschrift.nl

invisible hit counter

NLEnergie

%d bloggers liken dit: