Mijn hersenspinsels en gedachtekronkels

Living in exile in their own land; contemporary Native American artists

http://onglobalandlocalart.wordpress.com/2011/12/07/living-in-exile-in-their-own-land-contemporary-native-american-artists/

English version of my original Dutch article on Contemporary Native American art, published in ‘Decorum’, journal of the department of Art History, University of Leiden, March 1997, issue 1+2 (also published on this blog, see HERE).

              

This article was my first real publication and also my first small research in the field of  ‘contemporary art from outside the western world’. In that time the Leiden University was the only university in the Netherlands which started to explore this unknown field within the disciplinary of art history, today an important part of the subject  ‘World Art Sudies’.

Since this project in the nineties I never lost my interest in this particular issue in studying contemporary art and world culture, which finally lead to my research to contemporary art of the Arab world in the diaspora, especially Iraq. But this was my first published article on this subject.

Jimmie Durham, Pocahontas’ underwear, mixed media, 1985

Contemporary Native American Art

‘I did not know then how much was ended. When I look back now from this high hill of my old age, I can still see the butchered women and children lying heaped and scattered all along the crooked gulch as plain as when I saw them with eyes young. And I can see that something else died there in the bloody mud, and was buried in the blizzard. A people’s dream died there. It was a beautiful dream . . . . the nation’s hope has broken and scattered. There is no centre any longer, and the sacred tree is dead’. [1]

Black Elk

‘While the entire world is in an identity crisis, the New Indian still knows who he is’ [2]

Fritz Scholder

These quotations, the first of the Lakota Black Elk on the massacre of Wounded Knee in 1890 and the second by artist Fritz Scholder (Luseno) from the early seventies, show the North American Indians in this century have experienced turbulent changes. After the various Indian nations and tribes were subdued and banned to reservations, it was thought that America’s original inhabitants would disappear very soon. Nearly a century later, despite the social and economic problems, the Native Americans found a defined identity in a totally changed world.
Also artistic the Native Americans manifest themselves in various ways. In the reservations, which are relatively isolated from the rest of American society, a revival can be observed of the traditional arts. This applies especially to the peoples in the south-western United States (Navaho, Pueblo, Hopi) and for the peoples of the Canadian west coast (Haida, Tlingit, Kwakiutl). Elsewhere in North America there is also a revival of various tribal traditions.
These artistic expressions are not limited to nostalgia. Many of these artists are experimenting with new materials and shapes to give the traditional imagery a contemporary face. The most famous artists who work in this way are the ‘sand painter’ Joe Ben Jr. (Navaho) and the goldsmith and sculptor Bill Reid (Haida).

345773885_6_b1zN[1]

Joe Ben Jr., The Four Arrow-people, sand and pigment on earth (http://www.tribalexpressions.com/painting/ben.htm)

In this context I will discuss the more recent emerged artistic expressions. Beside artists of Native American origin who work in the tradition of their own cultural heritage, since the fifties a new phenomenon emerged, called ‘pan-indianism’, a movement that was close related with the increasing political and emancipatory struggle of the original inhabitants of America. This new activism was mainly originated by Native Americans living outside the reservations, and mostly had received university education.
Although the first and for a while  the only Indian with a university education, the famous Indian affairs commissioner Donehogawa or Ely Parker, lived in the nineteenth century, the Native Americans in general are still an underclass minority in American society. This new activism was mainly originated by Native Americans living outside the reservations, most by Native Americans citizens living in the cities. From the fifties however, there were more Indians who followed an academic education.
They were mainly representatives of this group who reconsidered their own identity. Also there were several political organizations established as ‘The National Congress of American Indians’ and militant movements like the ‘American Indian Movement’ (AIM) and ‘Red Power’ and organized political actions which sometimes took the attention of the world press, like the occupations of Alcatraz (1969) and Wounded Knee (1973, see this documentary by Roelof Kiers for the Dutch television of that time, Dutch and English spoken). In both cases these were intertribal actions, organized by AIM.
These activities can’t be understood out of context of the general protest movement of the sixties. The rise of the emancipation movement of Native Americans took place at the same time as the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam demonstrations. However, the most important Native American writer of that time, Vine Deloria Jr. (Lakota), president of the ‘National Congress of American Indians’ during the seventies and author of We talk, you listen, God is Red and Custer died for Your Sins, stipulates the differences with the Afro-American emancipation movement. Although he clearly expresses his sympathy for the Civil Rights Movement, in Custer died for your Sins (the title refers to the U.S. General Custer in 1876 with the Seventh Cavalry Regiment of the U.S. Army was massacred by the Lakota, the Western or Teton Sioux , led by Sitting Bull at the Little Bighorn) that the Native Americans strive for other goals than e.g. the Afro-Americans. In his view the main aim of the natives is not to integrate into American society, because Western culture is imposed on them involuntarily. In his manifesto Vine Deloria Jr. pleas as much as possible autonomy for the indigenous population, for self determination, land and particularly the maintenance of their own cultural heritage. In this regard he particularly criticizes the romantic attitude of some Westerners to the ‘noble savage’. He rejects a fashionable interest in Indian mysticism in the western world, in his opinion it is outright theft of ideas, from one hypocrisy after first massive genocide was committed on the Native Americans. [3] These ideas are also in line with that of Pam Colorado (Oneida), professor at the University of Toronto: ‘In the end non Indians will have complete power to define what is and what is not Indian, even for Indians … When this happens, the last vestiges of Indian Society and Indian rights will disappear. Non Indians will then ‘own’ our heritage and ideas as thoroughly as they now claim to own our land and resources’.[4]

345773727_6_uZUo[1]

Bill Reid (Haida), The Raven and the First Men, cedar wood, 1980 (Vancouver, British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology)

The New Indians

It was in the context of renewed Indian activism ‘Pan-Indianism’ emerged as an artistic movement. It was not a movement relying on a particular cultural or tribal tradition. The first ‘Pan-Indian art’ of the New Indians, as these artists called themselves, was particularly protest art, inspired by Pop Art. Using irony these artists challenged the discourse of the dominant American culture.
The most famous representative of this movement was the late Fritz Scholder (1937-2005). Scholder was a teacher at the Indian Art Institute in Santa Fe (Arizona) from 1964 to 1969, an institute which taught both traditional Native American art and Western art. His Pop Art-like works Scholder explains in an ironical way and expose abuses while he denounce Western stereotypes.

 

345774715_5_WrSB[1]

Fritz Scholder, Super Indian 2# (with Ice-cone), acryl on canvas, 1971

A typical work is Super Indian # 2 (with Ice-cone). In this work Scholder shows a stereotype image of an Indian from the Great Plains with an ice-cone. This paradoxical work could be interpreted in two ways: whether it is about the traditional Indian who became a part of today’s consumers culture and thus has become a kind of brand , or it is about the Indian self-conscious, which, while retaining traditions are able to maintain in today’s society. With these kind of works Scholder ‘tries to rewrite American history’. [5]

T.C. Cannon, Andrew Myrick, oil on canvas, 1974

Another striking example of the engaged art of the New Indians is a work of Tommy Cannon (Caddo / Kiowa), entitled Andrew Myrick. This work refers to a notorious event in Native American history during the war of the Eastern or Santee Dakota in Minesota in 1862. As the easternmost group of the Dakota / Sioux nation, in contrary to the western branch where the great and more than twenty years struggle had yet to begin, the Santees were already incorporated in U.S. reserves and were dependent on food supplies from the U.S. government. Because the distribution was in the hands of corrupt merchants the Santees received almost nothing of the Government’s supplies. This was the reason for Chief Little Crow to complain. In response one of the merchants Andrew Myrick answered: ‘If they’re hungry, let them eat grass’. This incident was the immediate cause of the great revolt in Minesota. Myrick was one of the first people who were killed. When the Santees slain him they filled his mouth full of grass and they mocked him with the words ‘Myrick is eating grass himself’. [6]
The work of Wayne Eagleboy (Onondaga), We-the people is a clear example of the style of the New Indians. The title refers to the text of the U.S. Constitution. We see the American flag, but instead of the stars we see with a barbed wire behind the faces of America’s original inhabitants. An effective metaphor for the outsider in his own country, a theme that often plays a role in the contemporary art of the Native Americans.

Wayne Eagleboy, We-the people, acryl and barbed wire on buffalo skin, 1971

Exiles in their own land

Beside the New Indians, other artists emerged who reflect on their Native origin. In this context, we need to pay some attention to the writer N. Scott Momoday (Kiowa). This writer and professor of English literature at Stanford University (California) is one of the most influential theorists in the field of modern Native American culture in the United States. Although he is not a descendant of one of the various peoples of the Pueblo Indians (the Kiowa of the Great Plains were nomadic, although they are linguistically related to e.g. the Tewa, who have lived in Pueblos), he spent a part of his life in Jemez Pueblo, an ancient holy site that plays an important role in his work. This is reflected strongly in his novels, like House Made of Dawn (Pulitzer Prize 1969). The central theme of his work is ‘living in exile in your own country’. He argues the Native Americans, despite the domination, still have a spiritual connection to the land of their ancestors. Restricted in their freedom by political, bureaucratic and economic factors, it is hard for the Indians to continue their relationship with a particular location in freedom. [7]
According to Vine Deloria Jr. is this the central issue of the ‘Fourth World Nations’, a concept which he defines as follows: ‘The Fourth World are all aboriginal and native peoples Whose lands fall within national boundaries and techno-bureaucratic administrations of countries of the First, Second or Third Worlds. As such, they are peoples without their own countries or, people who are usually in the minority, and without the power to direct the course of their collective lives’. [8]
Several contemporary artists of Native American origin are concerned with this issue. Frequently these artists were born in reservations, but educated in the cities. The artists dicussed here have returned to their origins which they investigate from a new perspective. The relationship between people, history and land is a major issue for them. The artist George Longfish (Seneca / Tuscarora) introduced the term ‘land base’. Longfish: ‘… the interwoven aspects of place, history, culture, physiology, and their people a sense of themselves and their spirituality and how the characteristics of the place are all part of the fabric. When rituals are integrated into the setting through the use of materials and specific places and when religion includes one walks upon the earth- that is land-base’. [9]
Longfish considers the Navaho art of sand painting as an example of ‘land base’ because ‘sand as an artistic medium is a microcosm of the surrounding desert’ [10], a form of art, religion and place in one.

1000113330_5_k9fW_1[1]

George Longfish, You can’t rollerskate in a Buffalo-herd, even if you have all the Medicine, acryl on canvas, 1979 (Lippard, p.110)

In his work You can’t skate in a Buffalo Herd You, even if you have all the medicine is the ‘land base’ element is very evident. In this abstract work the central circle and the motive of the four corners dominate the composition. Pictographic characters refer to landscapes and footprints. The circular shape and the characters resemble the type of shield that was formerly used by the nomadic tribes of the Great Plains. The appearance of the four directions is a very typical element of the Navaho sand painting, as applied by Joe Ben Jr., a traditional working Navaho artist, who in 1989 exhibited at the famous exhibition of Jean Hubert Martin Magiciens de la Terre, in the Centre Pompidou in Paris. [11]
You can’t rollerskate … could be a typical work might call pan-Indian, because elements are included of two different Indian cultures (those of the Great Plains nomads and those of the Navahos in the canyon areas of Arizona). These elements are not a part of the tradition of Longfish’ own origin; the Seneca and Tuscarora were sedentary farming peoples of the U.S. east coast. Longfish uses the circle motive, because he ‘was interested in the circle philosophy of the Native Americans. This title was chosen to put some ‘lightness into a serious painting’. [12]
In the context of this circle philosophy the following quote of the Lakota poet / mystic Black Elk of the early twentieth century is very relevant. Black Elk: ‘In almost everything the Idian does you find the circle motive, because the Power of the World always works in circles and everything tries to be round … The flowering tree was the living centre of the circle and the circle of the four winds made him grow … The sky is round and I’ve heard the earth is round like a sphere just like the stars. The wind turns around when it is at the very most. Birds build round nests because their belief is equal to ours. The sun rises and sets in an arch. The moon does the same and they both are round’.[13]

Jaune Quick To See Smith, Osage Orange, oil on canvas, 1985 (Lippard, p. 20). See also this dissertation Beyond Sweetgrass; the life and work of Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, by Joni L. Murphy, University of Kansas, 2008.

An artist who deals with a same kind of theme is Jaune Quick to See Smith (Salish). In her abstract work she is influenced by both the Native American pictographic tradition as the ‘classic modern masters’ like Klee, Gris, Picasso and Miró. Quick to See Smith’s use of color is inspired by the desert of New Mexico, where she lives. This is not the area where her ancestors came from (the original habitat of the Salish lay in the north-western states of Idaho and the State of Washington), but she also considers herself as a pan-Indian artist. She participates regularly in the so-called powwows, a twentieth century intertribal ritual, in which many elements of different tribes and cultures from across North America brought together in an eclectic way.
Quick to See Smith calls her more or less abstract work ‘narrative landscapes’, where ‘the epic element is visible only to one who is able to live in the barren, empty landscape itself’. Quick to See Smith: ‘When we talk, we talk in the past, and future present. When I paint I do the same. When you grow up in this environment, live is not romantic … Thus living language and are not embellished but simple and direct. I feel that in my paintings as well … I paint in a stream of consciousness so that pictographs on the rocks behind me muddling together with shapes of rocks I find in the yard, but all made over into my own expression. It’s not copying what’s there, it’s writing about it’.[14]
The work shown here, Osage Orange, is a clear example of such a ‘narrative landscape’. Between the abstract lines and color fields pictographic characters are all visible, pointing to recognizable figures, like humans, horses, snakes, a moose, astrological constellations and a canoe. The work as a whole represents a combination of natural forces and historical events, an imprint of space and time, according to the landbase philosophy always connected. The title refers to a small tree which branches were once used to make bows. When the first settlers came to the Osage Oranges were used as markers for barbed wire. ‘So this little  shrub played two very different roles in two different cultures’, sais Quick to See Smith. [15] So even this apparent non-political work can’t be understood out of context of the current situation of the Native Americans.

Jimmie Durham, We have made progress, mixed media, 1991

Jimmie Durham

‘Don’t worry, I’m a good Indian. I’m from the West, love nature, and have a special, intimate connection with the environment. I can speak with my animal cousins, and believe it or not I’m appropriately spiritual (even smoke the pipe). I hope I am authentic enough to have been worth of your time, and yet educated enough that you feel your conversation has been intelligent. I’ve been careful not to reveal to much, understanding consumers is a product in your society, you can buy some for the price of a magazine … I feel fairly sure that I could address the entire world if only I had a place to stand . You (White Americans) made everything your turf. In every field, on every issue, the ground has already been covered’. [16]

With these somewhat cynical words Jimmie Durham begins his essay The Ground has already been covered, in ‘Artforum’, summer 1988. This article describes the overall occupancy of the original Indian land by the white dominant culture, both materially and spiritually. The land has been splintered in unities with defined but artificial borders and in almost everything the occupation is noticeable, even considering ideas and language. In a certain way the concept of Durham fits in the notion of ‘exile in their own country’ of Scott O Momoday and Vine Deloria Jr. The tone is rather sarcastic and laced with cynical irony, a major strategy of the artist.
Jimmie Durham (Arkansas 1940) is a Cherokee, one of the nations which in 1834 were expelled from their original habitat (approximately the current Georgia) and past the infamous ‘Trail of Tears’ to the ‘Indian Territory’, the current State of Oklahoma, more than one thousand kilometers to the west. In the words of Durham the Cherokee are ‘a nation of losers’, a notion that plays an important role in the work of this artist. [17]
Jimmie Durham began his career as a political activist in AIM until the movement was unbound in the early eighties. From that moment he focussed on his art, which indeed always involves commitment. Durham: ‘It would be impossible, and I think immoral, to attempt to discuss American Indian Art sensibly without making central political realities’. [18]
After a time, having lived in New York ( ‘the only place in the United States for an Indian somewhat liveable’), in 1989 Durham moved into Mexico, as ‘in the U.S. the homeland of the Cherokee has buried where for us it is not allowed to stay’. After his Mexican period, Durham left the American continent and lived successively in Japan, Belgium, Ireland. and finally Germany (Berlin) [19]

345773273_6_5oBy[1]

Jimmie Durham, Selfportrait, mixed media, 1986

Key issues in Durham’s work are identity and origin, language, the ‘subjective and ideologically loaded history’ (compare with Fritz Scholder), the stereotypes non-Indians have on Indians and the postmodern notion that almost everything has been said or written ( See ‘The Ground has already been covered’). In his statements Durham is often very outspoken and provocative. By example he considers the vast oeuvre of Picasso as a ‘form of environmental pollution’. The ‘vast profusion of images doesn’t contribute to communicate great ideas’, states Durham. [20]
In his art he confronts the audience with their own stereotypes and prejudices by holding a mirror. In ‘The Ground has already been covered’ he projects all prejudices, stereotypes and romantic falsifications that non-Indians have on Indians to himself. Durham confronts the reader with all manner of ironic ambiguity to unmask certain fixed ideas and refute them. Durham doesn’t have much hope on improvement. In a double interview, together with the Cuban artist Ricardo Brey on the eve of the Documenta IX in Kassel, he calls himself an ‘anti-optimist’. He explains that this is not the same as a pessimist, the difference is between a nuance he only knows the Cherokee language. The bottom line is the phrase ‘probably not’ could mean a ‘maybe’, the hope of a ‘nation of losers’. Durham calls this his main philosophy: ‘Our life is in an intolerable way absurd. Everything is so banal, so absurd, that you aim to grin at it. I am not doomster, but I tend to say probably not’. [21]
Durham work consists of installations, ready-mades and text, in which he show many possible ambiguities and paradoxes. He considers his ready-mades as one of the most ‘Native American elements’ in his work. Since the first confrontation with the Europeans the Native Americans were masters to let their new goods undergo a ‘Duchamp-like metamorphosis’. Cooking pots, beads and blankets were so transformed they were immediately identifiable as ‘Indian objects’.

Jimmie Durham, Karankawa, mixed media, 1983 (Lippard, p. 217)

Karankawa (1983) is a clear example of Durham’s ready-made objects. The processed skull was from a person belonged to the Karankawa, an extinct indigenous people, which Durham found at the beach of Texas. By putting the skull on a socle this person regains some of his dignity. Durham added the eyes, one outward (by a shell) and the other inward (through an empty candle holder).
An other work in which he uses the motive of the outward and inward eye is Self Portrait from 1986. It is one of his most macabre objects. We can see the template of a human body covered with scars and wounds and filled with texts, surmounted by a mask. With this work Durham might give the appearance that he introduces himself to the viewer. Among the texts are some excerpts from his essay The ground has already been covered, but are mixed with other text fragments. Irony and self-mockery are again a part of his strategies.
In the autumn of 1995 Durham exhibited in the Netherlands for the first time, with his installation The Center Of The World, in Museum ‘De Vleeshal’ in Middelburg. In the huge space Durham made a few subtle changes. First was a network of steel cables along the walls, which were laced as small objects, bones, walnuts and iron scrap. In the corner stood a chair showing a phone. On a small monitor in a different corner was a performance video display, which showed how Durham in the middle of a field was trying to install another phone. While he was doing this, there was a persistent ringing. At one point from outside of the image of the monitor someone threw with a stone the handset of the phone. But the sound of the ringing continued.
Somewhere on the wall was stuck a little note with the following message: ‘Please understand that, in spite of all appearances I am not your enemy. It is my duty to find the truth and I will. I hope it will cause as little trouble as possible’. [22]
Added to this installation Durham wrote a small booklet with poems, short stories, anecdotes and individual claims. The texts were written in the Cherokee [23], English, Japanese and French, the languages spoken in the various places where the artist had lived. These texts were more confusing than enlightening. For example: ‘Grandmother Spider said: “When I die bury me with my face to the East”. The Spring after, tobacco grew where her vagina was. That is the reason we smoke tobacco’. This seems another example of how Durham confronts the viewer (especially the viewer who is seeking for exotic and mystical truths of a ‘spiritual Indian’) by saddling him with semi-profound wisdom, as he did In his essay The ground has already been covered.
In the foreword of the booklet it seems Durham unveils some of his intentions. The main theme of this installations are perhaps surprising and illogical associative ‘connections’. Durham: ‘If you follow one line it seems logical, if you follow a second it could still be true, but with the third everything falls apart’.
The booklet ends with the poem ‘The Center Of The World’. Here Durham cuts the word ‘invisibilite’ in different smaller units and adds new elements, so that more new ‘connections’ are created, such as ‘business’ and ‘visibilité’. Finally, he suggests that the concept ‘The Center of the World’ was not chosen randomly for this location, because in Middelburg the telescope was invented (by Zacharias Jansen and Johannes Lipperhey in 1608), an instrument that has achieved again ‘new connections’.
In this installation he spectator is the ‘Center of the World’. All around him are logical and non-logical ‘connections’ and it is up to the spectator whether he uses these lines to come to interact. Durham doesn’t make it easy and frequently gives the signal ‘wrong connection’ (almost literally, see the telephones). In my view the ringing phone on the monitor view represents Durham futile attempts to make contact, as he tries in The Ground has already been covered in ‘Artforum’ ( ‘I could address the entire world if only I had a place to stand’). Although all options are open this again fits in Durham philosophy ‘probably not’.

 

An impression of Durham’s installation The Center of the World, which was also exhibited at ‘De Vleeshal’  in Middelburg (The Netherlands), 1995 (http://vleeshal.nl/en/tentoonstellingen/jimmie-durham-the-center-of-the-world)

Jimmie Durham, The Center of the World, at ‘De Vleeshal’ (detail)

Jimmie Durham, The Center of the World, at ‘De Vleeshal’ (detail)

Position and place

The first thing that strikes after discussing these artists is the enormous diversity. Now this fact is not as spectacular as the traditionally Native America was a great patchwork of very different peoples, languages and cultures. It is striking, when initially expected that decimated the Indian population at the beginning of the twentieth century would soon disappear, since the sixties a great revival can be observed from various political and cultural events, not necessarily exclusively belonging  to a specific tribal or cultural tradition.
Remains for us to see if the categories which Susan Vogel has developed for classification of contemporary African art, also applicable to the contemporary art of Native America (this was a part of the original assignment in 1996, FS, see also http://www.susan-vogel.com/publications.html). At first sight maybe a little bit. In the traditional reserves is sometimes referred to ‘Traditional Art’ or ‘Functional Art’. Furthermore you can find many examples of ‘Extinct Art’ (eg tourist ‘totem poles’ in Vancouver, fixed ‘sand paintings’ of the Navaho or other ‘traditional objects’, mainly commercial artefacts for the tourist markets).
Yet I believe there is a danger in applying these types of African art on the contemporary art of the Native Americans. The situation of America’s original inhabitants is completely different than those of black Africa. Africa consists largely of former colonial countries, which are now the third world. The Indians of North America belong to the ‘Fourth World’, indigenous peoples are now dominated by imported culture, in this case within the boundaries of a First World country. This fact is, as previously shown, often essential on their contemporary art. To quote Jimmie Durham again: ‘It would be impossible, and I think immoral, to attempt to discuss American Indian Art sensibly without making central political realities’. Although the Fourth World issues in some areas of black Africa will play a role, perhaps as in southern Africa, where a very small minority of Bushmen is dominated by White Africans, Asians, Bantus and Zulus, is generally an African problem other than those of the North American Indians.
However, the history and current status of the Indians in Canada and the United States (often a minority and exiles in their own country) is an essential element for a decent understanding and interpretation of the contemporary Native American art and culture .

Floris Schreve

.

References

[1] Dee Brown, Bury my heart at Wounded Knee, New York, 1970, (Dutch edition, Begraaf mijn hart bij de bocht van de rivier, Hollandia, Baarn, 1973, p. 381)

[2] Axel Schultze, Indianische Malerei des Nord Amerikas 1830-1970, Stuttgart, 1973, p. 75

[3] Lucy Lippard, Mixed Blessings; New art in multicultural America, New York, 1990, p. 117

[4] Lippard, p. 117

[5] Schultze, p. 75.

[6] Brown, p. 44, 48

[7] See about this history http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/Indian.html[

[8] Lippard, p. 109

[10] Lippard, p. 109

[11] Jean Hubert Martin, Magiciens de la Terre, Musee Nationale d’ Art Moderne Centre Pompidou, Parijs, 1989, p. 92-93

[12] Lippard p. 109

[13] Ton Lemaire, Wij zijn een deel van de Aarde, Utrecht, 1988, p. 22

[14] Lippard, p. 119

[15] Lippard, p. 14

[16] Jimmie Durham, The ground has already been covered, in ‘Artforum’, summer 1988, New York, p. 101.

[17] Domenic van den Boogaard, Let Geerling, Outsiderart betekent uitsluiting; een gesprek tussen Ricardo Brey en Jimmie Durham, ‘Metropolis M’, nr. 4, Utrecht (The Netherlands) 1992, p. 24.

[18] Lippard, p. 204

[19] Hans Hartog Jager, Durham verstrikt bezoekers in netwerk van draad en botten, NRC Handelsblad (The Netherlands), 20-5-1995.

[20] van den Boogaard, Geerling , p. 24.

[21] idem, p. 25

[22] Jimmie Durham, The Center of the World, Middelburg, 1995, see http://vleeshal.nl/en/publicaties/jimmie-durham-document-3 .

[23] Although most of the Native American cultures of North America were non alphabethic (perhaps the Delaware, or Leni Lenape of the Eastern US Coast were an exeption) the Cherokee developed after the European invasion an alphabet of their own. This alphabet was developed by Sequoya (1760-1843), who used the phonetic European system by developing his own characters. The alphabet of Sequoya is still used by the Cherokee (see http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/535250/Sequoyah)

Moderne kunst van Indiaans Noord Amerika

English version: ‘Living in exile in their own land; Contemporary Native American Artists’ click  here 

Jimmie Durham, ‘Pocahontas’ underwear’, mixed media, 1985

In 1996 volgde ik met een klein groepje medestudenten aan de vakgroep kunstgeschiedenis van de Universiteit Leiden de projectgroep ‘Kunst in de multiculturele samenleving’ onder leiding van Dr. Willemijn Stokvis. Hoewel er binnen de kunstgeschiedenis als discipline al iets daarvoor steeds meer aandacht was ontstaan voor moderne en hedendaagse kunst buiten de westerse wereld (dus Europa en na de Tweede Wereldoorlog de Verenigde Staten) stond dit mondiale perspectief, binnen Nederland althans, nog sterk in de kinderschoenen. Er waren een paar musea voor volkenkunde die hier soms aandacht aan besteedden en in Amsterdam was net de Gate Foundation opgericht. Vanuit de universiteit waren wij echt de eersten.
Het werd een buitengewoon spannende projectgroep, waarbij iedereen echt alles zelf moest ontdekken. Na een voordracht van Els van Plas (oprichtster en toenmalige directeur van de Gate Foundation, tegenwoordig directeur van het Prins Claus Fonds) besloot zo’n beetje iedere deelnemer om een verschillend cultuurgebied in de wereld ter hand te nemen om een eerste verkenning te doen wat daar op artistiek gebied gedurende de twintigste eeuw zoal had plaatsgevonden. Het was natuurlijk een eerste kennismaking. Aan bod kwamen China, India, de Afrikaanse landen Nigeria, Zuid Afrika en Senegal, Aboriginal Australië en ik wilde iets doen met Indiaans Noord Amerika. Omdat het gebied dat wij onderzochten nog zo onontgonnen was besloten wij als methodische leidraad de publicatie Africa Explores, 20th Century African Art, New York, 1991, van Susan Vogel te nemen. Vandaar dat ik aan het eind van mijn artikel op haar indeling terugkom, die ik overigens niet geheel toepasbaar (logisch) vond voor mijn specifieke onderzoeksgebied, al bood het wel de gelegenheid om nog eens duidelijk uit te leggen wat het verschil is tussen de ‘derde wereld’ (voormalig gekoloniseerde landen) en de ‘vierde wereld’ (inheemse volkeren die nog steeds ‘gekoloniseerd’ zijn) .
Zonder dat we het van tevoren konden weten kwam er een mooi en rijk geschakeerd geheel uit. De opbrengst was zo onverwacht interessant dat het tijdschrift van de vakgroep kunstgeschiedenis, ‘Decorum’ ons vroeg om een thema nummer te maken. In 1997 verscheen het nummer ‘Wereldkunst’ dat al snel uitverkocht raakte en nu nergens meer te krijgen is, al hebben veel bibliotheken toen een exemplaar aangeschaft (het onderwerp bleek opeens waanzinnig hot en onze projectgroep van zeven deelnemers, olv Willemijn Stokvis, kwam zelfs boven de horizon van Rick van Ploeg, staatssecretaris van OCW in Paars II, die vijf jaar later nog een keer naar dit nummer van Decorum heeft verwezen).
Zelf heb ik dit onderwerp nooit meer los kunnen laten. De onderzoeksvraag van hoe de twintigste en inmiddels eenentwintigste eeuwse kunst zich ontwikkelde en ontwikkelt in niet-westerse gebieden heeft mij sinds die tijd sterk beziggehouden. Twee jaar na deze projectgroep heb ik stage gelopen bij het Prins Claus Fonds voor Cultuur en Ontwikkeling en daar ben ik op het idee gekomen om onderzoek te doen naar de hedendaagse kunst van de Arabische wereld.

              
Mijn artikel voor het tijdschrift Decorum was verder mijn eerste echte publicatie. Nu dit nummer nergens meer te krijgen is denk ik dat het wel aardig is als het jaren later op mijn blog verschijnt, met hier en daar een kleine update of herformulering en wat extra beeldmateriaal, al heb ik de oorspronkelijke tekst grotendeels intact gelaten. Bij deze mijn oude verhaal over de moderne en hedendaagse kunst van Indiaans Noord Amerika (voornamelijk de Verenigde Staten), met een sterke focus op het werk van de kunstenaar Jimmie Durham.

Hieronder ‘Man zoekt tuin’, een portret van Jimmie Durham in het VPRO programma RAM, uitgezonden op 26-10-2003 http://www.vpro.nl/programma/ram/afleveringen/14595478/items/14595726/

Jimmie Durham, ‘We have made progress’, mixed media, 1991

MODERNE KUNST VAN INDIAANS NOORD AMERIKA (English version here)
(verschenen in ‘Decorum’ (thema-nummer ‘Wereldkunst’), Tijdschrift voor kunst en cultuur, jaargang XV, nummer 1+2, maart 1997)

‘Ik wist toen nog niet aan hoeveel een einde was gekomen. Als ik nu terugkijk vanaf deze hoge heuvel van mijn ouderdom, kan ik de neergemaaide vrouwen en kinderen, die daar opeengehoopt verspreid langs het bochtige ravijn lagen, nog even duidelijk zien als toen ik hen zag met de ogen die nog jong waren. En ik kan zien dat er nog meer stierf daar, in de met bloed doordrenkte moddersneeuw en begraven werd in de sneeuwstorm. De droom van een volk stierf daar. Het was een prachtige droom. De band van de Natie is uiteen gevallen. Er is geen middelpunt meer en de gewijde boom is dood‘[i]

Black Elk

‘Terwijl de hele wereld zich in een identiteitscrisis bevindt, weet de Nieuwe Indiaan nog altijd wie hij is’[ii]

Fritz Scholder

Beide citaten, het eerste van de Lakota Black Elk over het bloedbad van Wounded Knee uit 1890 en het tweede van kunstenaar Fritz Scholder (Luseno) uit begin jaren zeventig, laten zien dat de Noord-Amerikaanse Indianen in deze eeuw een opmerkelijke ontwikkeling hebben doorgemaakt. Nadat alle verschillende indiaanse volkeren en stammen waren onderworpen en weggestopt in reservaten, dacht men dat Amerika’s oorspronkelijke bewoners spoedig zouden verdwijnen. Bijna een eeuw later blijkt dat de Indianen ondanks de grote sociale en economische problemen, een duidelijke identiteit hebben gevonden in een totaal veranderde wereld.
Ook op artistiek gebied manifesteren de Indianen zich op diverse wijze. Zo valt er in de reservaten die relatief geïsoleerd zijn van de rest van de Amerikaanse maatschappij, een grote opleving waar te nemen van de traditionele kunsten. Dit geldt vooral voor de volkeren in het zuid-westen van de Verenigde Staten (Navaho, Pueblo, Hopi) en voor de volkeren van de Canadese westkust (Haida, Tlingit, Kwakiutl). Elders in Noord Amerika is er eveneens een opleving van diverse tribale tradities.
Deze kunstuitingen beperken zich overigens niet tot nostalgie. Veel van deze kunstenaars experimenteren met nieuwe materialen en vormen om de traditionele beeldtaal een eigentijds gezicht te geven. De bekendste kunstenaars die op deze wijze te werk gaan zijn zijn de ‘zandschilder’ Joe Ben jr. (Navaho) en de beeldhouwer en edelsmid Bill Reid (Haida).

345773885_6_b1zN[1]

Joe Ben Jr., The Four Arrow-people, zand en pigment op een aarden vloer (http://www.tribalexpressions.com/painting/ben.htm)

In dit verband zullen de meer recent opgekomen kunstuitingen centraal staan. Naast kunstenaars van Indiaanse afkomst die vanuit de traditionele kunst werken, is er een vanaf de jaren vijftig een nieuw verschijnsel opgekomen, het zogenaamde ‘pan-indianisme’, een stroming die nau w verbonden is met de toenemende politieke en emancipatoire strijd van de oorspronkelijke bewoners van Amerika. Dit nieuwe activisme vond vooral zijn oorsprong bij Indianen die buiten de reservaten leven en een veelal universitaire opleiding hadden genoten.
Hoewel de eerste en lange tijd de enige indiaan met een universitaire opleiding, de beroemde commissaris voor Indiaanse aangelegenheden Donehogawa of Ely Parker, in de negentiende eeuw leefde, vormen de indianen nog steeds een onderklasse in de Amerikaanse samenleving. Vanaf de jaren vijftig zijn er echter steeds meer indianen die een academische opleiding hebben gevolgd.
Het zijn vooral representanten van deze groep die zich gaan herbezinnen op de eigen identiteit. Ook werden er verschillende politieke organisaties opgericht, zoals ‘The National Congress of American Indians’ en militante bewegingen als de ‘American Indian Movement’ (AIM) en ‘Red Power’. Ook worden er politieke acties georganiseerd die soms de wereldpers haalden, zoals de bezettingen van Alcatraz (1969) en Wounded Knee (1973, zie deze reportage van Roelof Kiers voor de VPRO). In beide gevallen ging het om stamoverschrijdende acties, georganiseerd door AIM.
Deze activiteiten zijn wellicht niet los te zien van de algemene protsestbeweging van de jaren zestig. De opkomst van de belangenorganisaties van de oorspronkelijke Amerikanen vond op hetzelfde moment plaats als die van de Civil Rights Movement en de Vietnam demonstraties. Toch neemt de belangrijkste Indiaanse auteur uit die tijd, Vine Deloria jr. (Lakota), in de jaren zeventig voorzitter van het ‘National Congress of American Indians’ en auteur van onder andere We talk, you listen, God is red en Custer died for your sins , juist afstand van de belangenorganisaties van bijvoorbeeld de zwarte Amerikanen. Hoewel hij duidelijk zijn sympathie uitspreekt voor de Civil Rights Movement, stelt hij in Custer died for your sins (de titel verwijst naar de Amerikaanse generaal Custer die in 1876 met het zevende cavalerie regiment van het Amerikaanse leger werd afgeslacht door de Lakota, de Westelijke Sioux, onder leiding van Sitting Bull bij de Little Bighorn) dat de Indianen andere doelen nastreven dan bijvoorbeeld de zwarte Amerikanen. De Indianen zijn er volgens hem niet op uit om te integreren in de Amerikaanse maatschappij, omdat de westerse cultuur hen onvrijwillig is opgelegd. In zijn manifest eist Vine Deloria jr. zoveel mogelijk autonomie voor de Indiaanse bevolking op, inzake zelfbestuur, landbezit en vooral het behoud van het eigen culturele erfgoed. Wat dat betreft hekelt hij vooral de romantische houding van bepaalde westerlingen naar de ‘nobele wilde’. Van een modieuze belangstelling voor Indiaanse mystiek vanuit de westerse wereld moet hij weinig hebben; naar zijn mening gaat het ronduit om ideeëndiefstal, vanuit een hypocriete houding nadat er eerst massaal genocide op de Indianen is gepleegd. [iii] Deze ideeën sluiten ook aan bij die van Pam Colorado (Oneida en hoogleraar aan de Universiteit van Toronto): ‘In the end non Indians will have complete power to define what is and what is not Indian, even for Indians… When this happens, the last vestiges of Indian Society and Indian rights will disappear. Non Indians wil then ‘own’ our heritage and ideas as thouroughtly as they now claim to own our land and resources’[iv]

345773727_6_uZUo[1]

Bill Reid (Haida), The Raven and the First Men, ceder hout, 1980 (Vancouver, British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology)

De protestkunst van de New indians

Het was tegen de achtergrond van het hernieuwde Indiaanse activisme dat het ‘Pan-Indianisme’ opkwam, als artistieke beweging. Het gaat hier niet om kunst die zich baseert op een bepaalde culturele of tribale traditie. De eerste Pan-Indiaanse kunstenaars of New Indians zoals zij zichzelf noemen, maakten vooral protestkunst, geïnspireerd door de Pop Art. Vaak gewapend met een dosis cynische humor stelden zij een aantal sociale misstanden aan de kaak.
De bekendste vertegenwoordiger van deze richting is de eerder aangehaalde Fritz Scholder. Scholder was van 1964 tot 1969 docent aan het Indian Art Institute in Santa Fe (Arizona), een kunstacademie waar gedoceerd wordt in zowel traditionele Indiaanse kunst als westerse kunst. In zijn Pop Art-achtige werken legt Scholder op een cynische manier misstanden bloot en stelt hij tegelijkertijd westerse stereotype denkbeelden aan de kaak.

345774715_5_WrSB[1]

Fritz Scholder, Super Indian 2# (with Ice-cone), acryl op doek, 1971

Een typerend werk is Super Indian #2 (with Ice-cone). In dit werk laat Scholder een ‘prototype prairie Indiaan’ zien met een ijslollie. Dit humoristische en paradoxale werk is op twee manieren te interpreteren: of het gaat hier om de traditionele Indiaan die een onderdeel is geworden van de consumptiemaatschappij en daarmee verworden is tot een soort merk, of het gaat hier om de zelfbewuste indiaan, die met behoud van tradities zich weet te handhaven in de huidige samenleving. Met dit soort werken wil Scholder de ‘Amerikaanse geschiedenis herschrijven’.[v]

T.C. Cannon, Andrew Myrick, olieverf op doek, 1974

Een ander zeer treffend voorbeeld van de geëngageerde kunst van de New Indians is een werk van Tommy Cannon (Caddo/Kiowa), getiteld Andrew Myrrick. Dit werk verwijst naar een beruchte anekdote ten tijde van de oorlog van de Oostelijke Dakota of Santee Sioux in Minesota uit 1862. De Santees waren, als de meest oostelijke groep van het Dakota/Sioux volk, itt tot de westelijke tak waar de grote en meer dan twintig jaar durende strijd nog moest beginnen, al geruime tijd ingelijfd in Amerikaanse reservaten en waren afhankelijk van voedselleveranties van de Amerikaanse regering. Doordat de distributie in handen was van corrupte kooplieden kregen de Santees bijna niets. Dat was de reden voor stamhoofd Little Crow om te gaan klagen. Als reactie hierop antwoordde een van de kooplieden, Andrew Myrick: ‘Wat mij betreft, laat ze gras eten als ze honger hebben, of hun uitwerpselen’. Deze uitspraak vormde de directe aanleiding voor de grote opstand in Minesota. Myrick was een van de eersten die omkwam. Toen de Santees hem gedood hadden stopten zij zijn mond vol gras en bespotten hem met de woorden ‘Myrick eet nu zelf gras’.[vi]Ook het werk van Wayne Eagleboy (Onondaga), We- the people is een duidelijk voorbeeld van de stijl van de New Indians. De titel verwijst naar de tekst van de Amerikaanse grondwet. Wij zien hier de Amerikaanse vlag, maar in plaats van de stars zien we een prikkeldraadversperring met daarachter de gezichten van Amerika’s oorspronkelijke bewoners. Een duidelijke metafoor voor het buitenstaander zijn in eigen land, een gegeven dat vaker een rol speelt in de hedendaagse kunst van de oorspronkelijke Amerikanen.

Wayne Eagleboy, We-the people, acryl en prikkeldraad op bizonhuid, 1971

Ballingen in eigen land

Naast de New Indians zijn er andere kunstenaars opgekomen die refelcteren op hun Indiaanse afkomst. In dit verband moet de schrijver N. Scott Momoday (Kiowa) genoemd worden. Deze schrijver en hoogleraar Engelse literatuur aan de Stanford University (Californië) is een van de meest invloedrijke theoretici op het gebied van de moderne Indiaanse cultuur in de Verenigde Staten. Hoewel hij zelf geen nazaat is van een van de verschillende volkeren van de Pueblo Indianen (de Kiowa waren prairie nomaden, al zijn zij wel taalkundig verwant aan bijv. de Tewa, die wel in Pueblo’s leefden), heeft hij een deel van zijn leven gewoond in Jemez Pueblo, een oude heilige plaats die een belangrijke rol speelt in zijn werk. Dit uit zich sterk in zijn romans, als House made of Dawn, waarmee hij in 1969 de Pulitzer Prize won. De centrale thematiek van zijn werk is ‘ballingschap in eigen land’. Hij stelt dat de Indianen ondanks de Amerikaanse overheersing, nog altijd een spirituele verbinding hebben met het land van hun voorouders. Beperkt in hun vrijheid, door politieke, bureaucratische en economische factoren, wordt het de indianen moeilijk gemaakt om in vrijheid hun relatie met een bepaalde plaats voort te zetten.[vii]
Volgens Vine Deloria jr. is dit de centrale problematiek van de ‘Vierde Wereldvolkeren’, een begrip dat hij als volgt definieert: ‘The Fourth World are all aboriginal and native peoples whose lands fall within national boundaries and techno-bureaucratic administrations of countries of the First, Second or Third Worlds. As such, they are peoples without countries of their own, people who are usually in the minority, and without the power to direct the course of their collective lives’.[viii]
Verschillende hedendaagse kunstenaars van Indiaanse afkomst houden zich bezig met deze problematiek. Veelal zijn deze kunstenaars in reservaten geboren, maar hebben in de stedelijke gebieden hun opleiding gevolgd. De hier te bespreken kunstenaars zijn weer teruggekeerd om vanuit hun nieuwe perspectief hun wortels te onderzoeken. De relatie tussen volk, geschiedenis en land is voor hen een belangrijk thema. De kunstenaar George Longfish (Seneca/Tuscarora) introduceerde voor deze thematiek de term ‘landbase’. Longfish: ‘…the interwoven aspects of place, history, culture, physiology, a people and their sense of themselves and their spirituallity and how the characteristics of the place are all part of the fabric. When rituals are integrated into the setting through the use of materials and specific places and when religion includes the earth upon one walks-that is landbase’.[ix]
Zo ziet Longfish bijvoorbeeld de Navaho zandschilderkunst als een duidelijk voorbeeld van landbase omdat ‘zand als artistiek medium een microkosmos is van de omringende woestijn’[x], een vorm waarin kunst, religie en plaats een geheel zijn geworden.

1000113330_5_k9fW_1[1]

George Longfish, You can’t rollerskate in a Buffalo-herd, even if you have all the Medicine, acryl op doek, 1979 (Lippard, p.110)

In zijn werk You can’tskate in a Buffalo Herd, even if you have all the Medicine is het ‘landbase’ element zeer duidelijk aanwezig. In dit abstracte werk vallen de centrale cirkel en de weergave van de vier windstreken op. Ook zijn er pictografische tekens te zien, verwijzend naar berglanschappen en voetsporen. De cirkelvorm en de tekens doen sterk denken aan het type schild dat vroeger wer gebruikt door de nomadische stammen van de Great Plains. De weergave van de vier windstreken is zeer kenmerkend voor de zandschilderkunst van de Navaho’s , zoals die wordt toegepast door Joe Ben jr., een traditioneel werkende Navaho kunstenaar, die in 1989 exposeerde op de beroemd geworden tentoonstelling van Jean Hubert Martin Magiciens de la Terre, in het Centre Pompidou te Parijs.[xi]
You can’t rollerskate… zou je een typisch pan-Indiaans werk kunnen noemen, omdat er elementen zijn opgenomen uit twee totaal verschillende Indiaanse culturen (die van de Great Plains nomaden en die van de Navaho’s uit de canyongebieden van Arizona). Deze hebben overigens weer weinig te maken met Longfish eigen afkomst; de Seneca en de Tuscarora waren weer sedentaire landbouwvolkeren van de Amerikaanse oostkust.. Longfish gebruikt hier het cirkelmotief, omdat hij ‘geïnteresseerd was in de cirkelfilosofie van de oorspronkelijke Amerikanen’. De titel werd gekozen om wat ‘lichtvoetigheid te brengen in een serieus schilderij’. [xii]
In het verband met deze cirkelfilosofie is het misschien verhelderend om de woorden van de Lakota dichter/mysticus Black Elk aan te halen, begin van de twintigste eeuw. Black Elk: ‘In alles wat de Indiaan doet vindt U de cirkelvorm terug, want de Kracht van de Wereld werkt altijd in cirkels en alles tracht rond te zijn…De bloeiende boom was het levende middelpunt van de kring en de cirkel van de vier windstreken deed hem gedijen…De hemel is rond en ik heb gehoord dat ook de aarde rond is als een bal en de sterren eveneens. De wind draait rond als hij op zijn allersterkst is. Vogels bouwen ronde nesten omdat hun geloof gelijk is aan het onze. De zon komt op en gaat onder in een boog. De maan doet hetzelfde en beide zijn rond’.[xiii] Een aardig detail is overigens dat het nu ook duidelijk wordt waarom indianen uit sommige gebieden (dit geldt vooral voor de nomadische prairievolkeren en niet voor de sedentaire landbouwers) er een probleem mee hadden om, net als de blanke kolonisators, in vierkanten en rechthoekige huizen te gaan wonen. Hier zijn vele voorbeelden van bekend.

Jaune Quick To See Smith, Osage Orange, olieverf op doek, 1985 (Lippard, p. 20). See also this dissertation Beyond Sweetgrass; the life and work of Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, by Joni L. Murphy, University of Kansas, 2008.

Een kunstenares die zich bezig houdt met een zelfde soort thematiek is Jaune Quick to See Smith (Salish). In haar abstracte werk is zij zowel beïnvloedt door de Indiaanse pictografische schilderstijl als door de ‘klassieke moderne meesters’ als Klee, Gris, Picasso en Miró. Quick to See Smith’s kleurgebruik is geïnspireerd op de woestijn van New Mexico, waar zij nu woont. Dit is niet het gebied waar haar voorouders vandaan kwamen (het oorspronkelijke leefgebied van de Salish lag in de noordwestelijke staten Idaho en de State of Washington), maar zij ziet zichzelf eveneens als een pan-Indiaanse kunstenares. Regelmatig neemt zij dan ook deel aan de zogenaamde powwows, een twintigste eeuws intertribaal ritueel, waarin allerlei elementen van verschillende stammen en culturen uit heel Noord Amerika op een eclectische manier zijn samengevoegd. Dit laat overigens zien hoe betrekkelijk recent veel rituelen van de huidige Native Americans zijn. ‘Invented identity’ zou Edward Said het noemen, of een ‘invented tradition’, naar de notie van de Britse historici Eric Hobsbawm en Terence Ranger.
Quick to See Smith noemt haar min of meer abstracte werk ‘narratieve landschappen’, waarin het verhaal alleen zichtbaar is voor ‘degene die in staat is het leven in het kale, lege landschap zelf waar te nemen’. Qick to See Smith: ‘When we talk, we talk in the past, pesent and future. When I paint I do the same. When you grow up in this environment, life is not romantic…Thus language and living are not embellished but simple and direct. I feel that in my paintings as well…I paint in a stream of conciousness so that pictographs on the rocks behind me muddle together with shapes of rocks I find in the yard, but all made over into my own expression. It’s not copying what’s there, it’s writing about it.’[xiv]
Het hier getoonde werk Osage Orange is een duidelijk voorbeeld van zo’n ‘narratief landschap’. Tussen de abstracte lijnen en kleurvlakken zijn allerlei pictografische tekens zichtbaar, verwijzend naar herkenbare figuren, zoals mensen, paarden, slangen, een eland, hemellichamen en een kano. Het geheel is een combinatie van natuurkrachten en de historische gebeurtenissen, die in de landbase filosofie altijd hun stempel drukken op het totaal. De titel verwijst naar een bepaalde kleine boomsoort waarvan het hout vroeger werd gebruikt om bogen te maken. Toen de eerste kolonisten kwamen werden de Osage Oranges gebruikt om als paaltjes voor prikkeldraadversperringen. ‘Dus dit kleine bosje vervulde twee verschillende functies in twee verschillende culturen’, aldus Quick to See Smith. [xv] Dus ook dit ogenschijnlijke a-politieke werk is niet los te zien van de politieke situatie waarin Amerika’s oorspronkelijke bewoners zich nu bevinden.

Jimmie Durham

‘Don’t worry-I’m a good Indian. I’m from the West, love nature, and have a special, intimate connection with the environment. I can speak with my animal cousins, and believe it or not I’m appropriately spiritual (even smoke the pipe). I hope I am authentic enough to have been worth of your time, and yet educated enough that you feel your conversation has been intelligent. I ‘ve been careful not to reveal to much; understanding is a consumers product in your society; you can buy some for the price of a magazine… I feel fairly sure that I could address the entire world if only I had a place to stand. You (White Americans) made everything your turf. In every field, on every issue, the ground has already been covered’.[xvi]

Met deze enigszins cynische woorden begint Jimmie Durham zijn essay ‘The Ground has already been covered’, in Artforum, zomer 1988. Het stuk beschrijft verder de totale bezetting van het oorspronkelijke Indiaanse land door de blanke dominante cultuur, zowel materieel als geestelijk. Het land is doortrokken met afgebakende grenzen en aan alles is de bezetting te merken, zelfs wat betreft de ideeën en in de taal. Hierbij sluit Durham zich aan bij de notie van ballinschap in eigen land van Scott Momoday en Deloria jr. De toon is echter tamelijk sarcastisch en doorspekt met zwarte humor, een belangrijk strijdmiddel van deze kunstenaar.
Jimmie Durham (Arkansaw 1940) is een Cherokee, een volk dat in 1934 is verdreven uit het oorspronkelijke leefgebied (ong. in het huidige Georgia) en langs het beruchte ‘Spoor der Tranen’ is gedeporteerd naar het ‘Indian Territory’, het huidige Oklahoma, meer dan duizend kilometer naar het westen. De Cherokee zijn, in de woorden van Durham ‘een volk van verliezers’, een gegeven dat een belangrijke rol speelt in het werk van deze kunstenaar.[xvii]
Jimmie Durham begon zijn carrière als politiek activist in AIM, totdat deze beweging begin jaren tachtig werd opgeheven. Vanaf dat moment heeft hij zich uitsluitend beziggehouden met kunst, waarin overigens altijd sprake is van engagement. Durham: ‘It would be impossible, and I think immoral, to attempt to discuss American Indian art sensibly without making polical realities central’. [xviii]
Na een tijd in New York te hebben gewoond (‘de enige plaats in de Verenigde Staten die voor een indiaan enigszins leefbaar is’), verhuisde Durham in 1989 naar Mexico, omdat in de VS het thuisland van de Cherokee ligt begraven waar het ons niet is toegestaan om te verblijven’. Na zijn Mexicaanse periode heeft Durham het Amerikaanse continent verlaten en woonde hij achtereenvolgens in Japan, België en Ierland.[xix]

345773273_6_5oBy[1]

Jimmie Durham, Selfportrait, mixed media, 1986

Belangrijke thema’s in Durhams werk zijn identiteit en afkomst, taal, de ‘subjectieve en ideologisch beladen geschiedenis’ (vergelijk met Fritz Scholder), het stereotiepe beeld dat niet-Indianen van Indianen hebben en het postmoderne idee dat bijna alles al gezegd en geschreven is (zie ‘The Ground has already been covered’). Vooral wat betreft het laatste schuwt hij pittige uitspraken niet. Zo ziet hij het enorme oeuvre van Picasso als een ‘vorm van millieuvervuiling’. De enorme overdaad aan beelden komt de uit te dragen ideeën niet ten goede, vindt Durham. [xx]
In zijn kunst wil hij de toeschouwer confronteren met zijn eigen vooringenomenheden en vooroordelen door hem als het ware een spiegel voor te houden. Niet voor niets betrekt hij in ‘The Ground has already been covered’ alle vooroordelen, stereotiepen en romantische falsificaties die niet-Indianen veelal over Indianen hebben op zichzelf. Op deze wijze confronteert Durham de lezer op ironische wijze met allerlei dubbelzinnigheden om bepaalde vastgeroeste ideeën bloot te leggen en ze te ontzenuwen. Veel hoop op verbetering heeft Durham niet. In een gesprek met de Cubaanse kunstenaar Ricardo Brey, aan de vooravond van de Documenta IX te Kassel, noemt hij zichzelf een ‘anti-optimist’. Hij legt uit dat dit niet hetzelfde is als een pessimist; het verschil hiertussen is een nuance die hij alleen uit de taal van de Cherokee kent. Het komt er op neer dat de uitdrukking ‘waarschijnlijk niet’ een ‘misschien wel’ impliceert; de hoop van een ‘volk van verliezers’. Durham noemt dit zijn levensfilosofie: ‘Ons leven is op een absurde manier niet te tolereren. Alles is zo onnozel, zo absurd, dat je erom moet grinniken. Ik ben gen doemdenker, maar ik neig ertoe te zeggen probably not‘.[xxi]
Durhams werk bestaat uit installaties, ready-mades en tekst, waarin hij zoveel mogelijk dubbelzinnigheden en paradoxen laat zien. Het gebruik ban ready-mades ziet hij als een van de meest ‘Indiaanse elementen’ in zijn werk. Al vanaf de eerste confrontatie met de Europeanen wisten de Indianen de door ruilhandel verkregen goederen een ‘Duchamps-achtige’ metamorfose te laten ondergaan. Kookpotten, kralen en dekens werden zo getransformeerd dat ze direct te identificeren waren als ‘Indiaanse objecten’. Museum Boymans van Beunigen heeft hier met de tentoonstelling ‘One man’s trash is another man’s treasure’ in de winter van 1996 aandacht aan besteed.

345776752_5_MpJv[1]

Jimmie Durham, Karankawa, mixed media, 1983 (Lippard, p. 217)

Het hier getoonde werk Karankawa uit 1983, is een goed voorbeeld van Durham’s ready-made objecten. De in dit object verwerkte schedel is afkomstig van een Karankawa, een uitgestorven indianenvolk, die Durham op het strand van Texas heeft gevonden. Door de schedel op een sokkel te zetten krijgt deze gestorven indiaan zijn waardigheid weer terug. Opvallend zijn de door Durham toegevoegde ogen, een naar buiten gericht (door een schelp) en de ander naar binnen (door een lege kaarsenhouder).
Eeen ander werk waar het naar buiten en naar binnen gekeerde oog terugkeert is Selfportrait uit 1986. Het is een van zijn meest macabere objecten. Wij zien hier het sjabloon van een menselijk lichaam, bezaaid met littekens en wonden en volgeschreven met teksten, met daarboven een masker. Durham wekt met dit verwarring zaaiende werk de schijn op dat hij zich introduceert bij de toeschouwer. Onder de teksten bevinden zich ook enkele fragmenten van zijn essay The ground has already been covered, maar zijn vermengd met andere tekstflarden. Ironie en zelfspot ontbreken hier niet.
In het najaar van 1995 exposeerde Durham voor het eerst in Nederland met zijn installatie The Center of the World, in de Vleeshal in Middelburg. Durham bracht in de grote ruimte minimale veranderingen aan. Als eerste viel een netwerk van staalkabels langs de muren op, waaraan kleine voorwerpen waren geregen zoals, botten, walnoten en ijzerafval. In de hoek stond een kruk met daarop een telefoon. De telefoon kwam weer terug in een video, vertoond op een kleine monitor in een andere hoek. Hier werd een videoperformance getoond, waar te zien was hoe Durham midden in een weiland een telefoon probeerde te installeren. Terwijl hij hiermee bezig was, klonk er een aanhoudend gerinkel. Op een gegeven moment wordt er van buiten het beeld met een steen de hoorn van de haak gegooid. Het geluid van het gerinkel bleef.
Ergens op de muur was een klein briefje geplakt met de volgende boodschap: ‘Please understand that, in spite of all appearances I am not your ennemy. It is my duty to find the truth and I will. I hope it will cause as little trouble as possible’.[xxii]
Bij deze installatie schreef Durham een klein tekstenboekje met gedichten, korte verhalen, losse beweringen en anekdotes. De teksten zijn geschreven in het Cherokee[xxiii], Engels, Japans en Frans; de talen die gesproken worden op de diverse plaatsen waar de kunstenaar heeft gewoond. De teksten werken eerder verwarrend dan verhelderend; zo staat er bijvoorbeeld: ‘Grandmother Spider said: “When I die bury me with my face to the East”. The Spring after, tobacco grew where her vagina was. That is the reason we smoke tobacco’. Dit lijkt me weer een voorbeeld hoe Durham de toeschouwer pest (en dan vooral de toeschouwer die op zoek is naar exotische en diepe mystieke waarheden van een pure en wijze indiaan) door hem op te zadelen met semi-diepzinnige wijsheden, zoals hij dat ook deed in zijn essay The ground has already been covered.
In het voorwoord van het tekstenboekje ligt Durham een tipje van de sluier op. Het belangrijkste thema van deze bevreemdende installatie zijn wellicht associatieve en onlogische ‘verbindingen’. Durham: ‘Als je een lijn volgt lijkt het logisch, als je een tweede volgt klopt het nog steeds, maar bij een derde begrijp je het niet meer’.
De tekstenbundel eindigt met het gedicht ‘The Center of the world’. Hier haalt Durham het woord invisibilité uit elkaar, zodat er weer nieuwe ‘verbindingen’ ontstaan, zoals visite en visibilité. Tot slot suggereert hij dat zijn thema voor een plaats als Middelburg niet willekeurig gekozen is, waar de telescoop is uitgevonden (door Zacharias Jansen en Johannes Lipperhey, in 1608), een instrument dat weer ‘nieuwe verbindingen’ tot stand heeft gebracht.
De toeschouwer is in deze installatie het ‘Centrum van de Wereld’. Om hem heen bevinden zich logische en niet-logische ‘verbindingen’ het is aan hem of hij gebruik maakt van deze lijntjes om tot interactie te komen. Durham maakt het hem niet gemakkelijk en geeft regelmatig het signaal ‘verkeerd verbonden’ af. Mijns inziens representeert de rinkelende telefoon op de monitor Durhams vergeefse pogingen om contact te leggen, zoals hij dat ook probeert in The Ground has already been covered in ‘Artforum’ (‘I could address the entire world if only I had a place to stand’). Hoewel alle mogelijkheden openliggen past dit weer duidelijk in Durhams levensfilosofie ‘probably not’.

Jimmie Durham, The Center of the World, at ‘De Vleeshal’ (detail)

Jimmie Durham, The Center of the World, at ‘De Vleeshal’ (detail)

Slot

Het eerste dat opvalt na het bespreken van deze kunstenaars is de enorme diversiteit. Nu is dit feit op zich niet zo opzienbarend omdat van oudsher Indiaans Amerika een grote lappendeken was van totaal verschillende volkeren, talen en culturen. Wel is het opvallend, nadat men in eerste instantie verwachtte dat de gedecimeerde Indiaanse bevolking aan het begin van de twintigste eeuw spoedig zou verdwijnen, er sinds de jaren zestig een grote opleving is waar te nemen van allerlei politieke en culturele manifestaties, zonder noodzakelijkerwijs gebonden te zijn aan een een specifieke tribale of culturele traditie. In die zin kent het ook een sterk ‘neo’element.
Rest ons nog te kijken of de categoriën, die Susan Vogel ter indeling van de hedendaagse Afrikaanse kunst heeft ontwikkeld, ook toepasbaar zijn voor de hedendaagse kunst van Indiaans Amerika. Op het eerste gezicht misschien enigszins. In de traditionele reservaten is er soms sprake van Traditional Art en New Functional Art. Verder zijn er natuurlijk legio voorbeelden van Extinct Art (bijv. toeristische totempalen in Vancouver, gefixeerde ‘zandschilderijen’ van de Navaho of kralensouverniers van de hedendaagse Lakota).
Toch schuilt er naar mijn mening een gevaar in het toepassen van deze categorieën voor Afrikaanse kunst toe te passen op die van de Native Americans. De situatie van Amerika’s oorspronkelijke bewoners is een totaal andere dan die van zwart Afrika. Afrika bestaat grotendeels uit oud-koloniale landen, die nu tot de derde wereld behoren. De Indianen van Noord Amerika behoren tot de zogenaamde ‘Vierde Wereld’, oorspronkelijke bewoners die nu worden gedomineerd door een geïmporteerde cultuur, in dit geval binnen de grenzen van een ‘Eerste Wereldland’. Dit gegeven is, zoals eerder aangetoond, veelal essentieel voor de thematiek van hun hedendaagse kunst. Hoewel de Vierde Wereld problematiek in sommige gebieden van zwart Afrika wel een rol zal spelen, zoals misschien in zuidelijk Afrika, waar een zeer kleine minderheid van Bosjesmannen wordt gedomineerd door Blanke Afrikaners, Aziaten, Bantoengs en Zulu’s, is in het algemeen de Afrikaanse problematiek een andere dan die van de Noord Amerikaanse Indianen.
Hoe dan ook, de geschiedenis en de huidige positie van de Indianen in Canada en de Verenigde Staten (een minderheid en vaak een balling in eigen land) is een wezenlijk aspect om tot een juist begrip en interpretatie te komen van de hedendaagse Indiaanse kunst en cultuur.

Floris Schreve

English version: ‘Living in exile in your own land; Contemporary Native American Artists’ click  here 

Click here for a larger version

Jimmie Durham, Dead Deer, 1986. At the moment this work is exhibited in Het Stedelijk Museum Bureau in Amsterdam. Exhibition ‘In Between Things’, from 12 June – 8 August 2010, Stedelijk Museum Bureau, Rozenstraat 59, Amsterdam (see http://www.smba.nl/en/exhibitions/)

——————————————————————————–
[i]Dee Brown, Begraaf mijn hart bij de bocht van de rivier, New York, 1970, p. 381.]

[ii]Axel Schultze, Indianische malerei des Nord Amerikas 1830-1970, Stuttgart, 1973, p. 75.]

[iii]Lucy Lippard, Mixed Blessings; New art in multicultural America, New York, 1990, p. 117.]

[iv] Lippard (op. cit.) p. 117

[v] Schultze (op. Cit.), zie noot 2.

[vi] Brown (op .cit.) p. 44, 48

[vii] Zie over deze geschiedenis (zoals die van de beruchte Indian Removal Act uit 1830) de informatieve website http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/Indian.html[

viii] Lippard, op cit., p. 109

[ix] ibidem

[x] Lippard (op. Cit.), p. 109

[xi] Catalogus Magiciens de la Terre, Musee Nationale dÁrt Moderne Centre Pompidou, Parijs, 1989, p. 92-93

[xii] Lippard (op. Cit., zie noot 10)

[xiii] Ton Lemaire, Wij zijn een deel van de Aarde, Utrecht, 1988, p. 22

[xiv] Lippard (op. Cit.) p. 119.

[xv] Lippard, (op .cit.) zie noot 14

[xvi] Jimmie Durham, The ground has already been covered, in ‘Artforum’, summer 1988, New York, p. 101.

[xvii] Domenic van den Boogaard, Let Geerling, ‘Outsiderart betekent uitsluiting; een gesprek tussen Ricardo Brey en Jimmie Durham, ‘Metropolis M’, nr. 4, Utrecht 1992, p. 24.

[xviii] Lippard (op cit.) p. 204

[xix] Hans Hartog Jager, Durham verstrikt bezoekers in netwerk van draad en botten, NRC Handelsblad, 20-5-1995.

[xx] Metropolis M (op. Cit.), zie noot 17, p. 24.

[xxi] Ibidem, p. 25

[xxii] Jimmie Durham, The Center of the World, Middelburg, 1995.

[xxiii] Hoewel de Noord Amerikaanse Indianenculturen grotendeels schriftloos waren (op de Delaware uit het oosten van de VS na, die een alfabet ontwikkelden en een heilig boek , de Walam Olum kenden) ontwikkelden de Cherokee na de komst van de Europeanen een eigen alfabet. De bedenker was een zekere Sequoya (1760-1843, waar later een woudreuzensoort in de redwoods van Californië is genoemd, heeft overigens niets te maken met de persoon Sequoya) die zich had laten inspireren door de Europese nieuwkomers. Het alfabet van Sequoya wordt nog steeds door de Cherokee gebruikt (zie http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/535250/Sequoyah).

%d bloggers liken dit: